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Jeremy Snyder [39]Joel Snyder [11]James G. Snyder [10]Jeremy C. Snyder [6]
James Snyder [5]James V. Snyder [5]Jane Mcintosh Snyder [4]Jon R. Snyder [3]

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  1. Exploitation and Sweatshop Labor: Perspectives and Issues.Jeremy Snyder - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (2):187-213.
    In this review, I survey theoretical accounts of exploitation in business, chiefly through the example of low wage or sweatshop labor. This labor is associated with wages that fall below a living wage standard and include long working hours. Labor of this kind is often described as self-evidently exploitative and immoral (Van Natta 1995). But for those who defend sweatshop labor as the first rung on a ladder toward greater economic development, the charge that sweatshop labor is self-evidently exploitative fails (...)
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  2. Needs Exploitation.Jeremy C. Snyder - 2008 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (4):389-405.
    Sweatshop labor is often cited as an example of the worst and most pervasive form of exploitation today, yet understanding what is meant by the charge has proven surprisingly difficult for philosophers. I develop an account of what I call “Needs Exploitation,” grounded in a specification of the duty of beneficence. In the case of sweatshop labor, I argue that employers face a duty to extend to employees a wage sufficient to meet their basic needs. This duty is limited by (...)
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  3.  64
    The End of Modernity: Nihilism and Hermeneutics in Postmodern Culture.Gianni Vattimo & Jon R. Snyder - 1988 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 47 (4):401.
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  4. Efficiency, Equity, and Price Gouging: A Response to Zwolinski.Jeremy Snyder - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (2):303-306.
    ABSTRACT:In this response, I reiterate my argument that price gouging undercuts the goal of equity in access to essential goods whereas Zwolinski emphasizes the importance of the efficient provision of essential goods above all other goals. I agree that the efficient provision of essential goods is important as I argue for the goal of equitable access to sufficient of the goods essential to living a minimally flourishing human life. However, efficiency is a means to this goal rather than the end (...)
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  5. Too Odd (Not) to Be True? A Reply to Olsson.Luc Bovens, Branden Fitelson, Stephan Hartmann & Josh Snyder - 2002 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (4):539-563.
    Corroborating Testimony, Probability and Surprise’, Erik J. Olsson ascribes to L. Jonathan Cohen the claims that if two witnesses provide us with the same information, then the less probable the information is, the more confident we may be that the information is true (C), and the stronger the information is corroborated (C*). We question whether Cohen intends anything like claims (C) and (C*). Furthermore, he discusses the concurrence of witness reports within a context of independent witnesses, whereas the witnesses in (...)
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  6.  57
    Relative Versus Absolute Standards for Everyday Risk in Adolescent HIV Prevention Trials: Expanding the Debate.Jeremy Snyder, Cari L. Miller & Glenda Gray - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):5 - 13.
    The concept of minimal risk has been used to regulate and limit participation by adolescents in clinical trials. It can be understood as setting an absolute standard of what risks are considered minimal or it can be interpreted as relative to the actual risks faced by members of the host community for the trial. While commentators have almost universally opposed a relative interpretation of the environmental risks faced by potential adolescent trial participants, we argue that the ethical concerns against the (...)
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  7. Efficiency, Equity, and Price Gouging: A Response to Zwolinski.Jeremy Snyder - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (2):303-306.
    In this response, I reiterate my argument that price gouging undercuts the goal of equity in access to essential goods whereas Zwolinski emphasizes the importance of the efficient provision of essential goods above all other goals. I agree that the efficient provision of essential goods is important as I argue for the goal of equitable access to sufficient of the goods essential to living a minimally flourishing human life. However, efficiency is a means to this goal rather than the end (...)
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  8. Photography, Vision, and Representation.Joel Snyder & Neil Walsh Allen - 1975 - Critical Inquiry 2 (1):143-169.
    Is there anything peculiarly "photographic" about photography—something which sets it apart from all other ways of making pictures? If there is, how important is it to our understanding of photographs? Are photographs so unlike other sorts of pictures as to require unique methods of interpretation and standards of evaluation? These questions may sound artificial, made up especially for the purpose of theorizing. But they have in fact been asked and answered not only by critics and photographers but by laymen. Furthermore, (...)
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  9.  8
    Exploiting hope: how the promise of new medical interventions sustains us -- and makes us vulnerable.Jeremy Snyder - 2021 - New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    We often hear stories of people in terrible and seemingly intractable situations that are preyed upon by individuals offering empty promises of help. Frequently these cases are condemned as "exploiting the hope" of another. These accusations are made in a range of contexts, including human smuggling, the beauty industry, and unproven medical interventions. This concept is meant to do heavy lifting in public discourse, identifying a specific form of unethical conduct. However, it is poorly understood what is intended to be (...)
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  10.  44
    Is Health Worker Migration a Case of Poaching?Jeremy Snyder - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (3):3-7.
    Many nations in the developing world invest scarce funding into training health workers. When these workers migrate to richer countries, particularly when this migration occurs before the source community can recoup the costs of training, the destination community realizes a net gain in resources by obtaining the workers' skills without having to pay for their training. This effect of health worker migration has frequently been condemned as 'poaching' or a case of theft. I assess the charge that the rich nations (...)
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  11.  56
    Exploitation and demeaning choices.Jeremy Snyder - 2013 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 12 (4):345-360.
    Scholarship aiming to describe the wrongness of exploitation, especially when it is voluntary and mutually beneficial, has increased greatly in recent years. In this paper, I expand the scope of this discussion by highlighting a set of additional ethical concerns associated with many cases of mutually voluntary and beneficial exploitation. Specifically, I argue that the phenomenon of persons desperately seeking out and gratefully accepting exploitative interactions raises special moral concerns. The element of voluntariness is key to understanding how and why (...)
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  12.  48
    Development of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Policy for the Care of Terminally Ill Patients Who May Become Organ Donors after Death Following the Removal of Life Support.Michael A. DeVita & James V. Snyder - 1993 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 3 (2):131-143.
    In the mid 1980s it was apparent that the need for organ donors exceeded those willing to donate. Some University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) physicians initiated discussion of possible new organ donor categories including individuals pronounced dead by traditional cardiac criteria. However, they reached no conclusion and dropped the discussion. In the late 1980s and the early 1990s, four cases arose in which dying patients or their families requested organ donation following the elective removal of mechanical ventilation. Controversy surrounding (...)
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  13.  59
    Picturing Vision.Joel Snyder - 1980 - Critical Inquiry 6 (3):499-526.
    I find it more than merely suggestive that we call many different kinds of pictures "realistic." As a category label, "realistic" is remarkably elastic. We cheerfully place into the category pictures that are made in strict accordance with the rules of linear perspective, pictures that are at slight variance with those rules but that nonetheless look perfectly "correct" , and pictures made in flagrant contravention of perspective geometry . We accept as realistic pictures that are made in strict accordance with (...)
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  14.  37
    Crowdfunding for medical care: Ethical issues in an emerging health care funding practice.Jeremy Snyder - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (6):36-42.
    Crowdfunding websites allow users to post a public appeal for funding for a range of activities, including adoption, travel, research, participation in sports, and many others. One common form of crowdfunding is for expenses related to medical care. Medical crowdfunding appeals serve as a means of addressing gaps in medical and employment insurance, both in countries without universal health insurance, like the United States, and countries with universal coverage limited to essential medical needs, like Canada. For example, as of 2012, (...)
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  15.  71
    Exploitations and their complications: The necessity of identifying the multiple forms of exploitation in pharmaceutical trials.Jeremy Snyder - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (5):251-258.
    Human subject trials of pharmaceuticals in low and middle income countries have been associated with the moral wrong of exploitation on two grounds. First, these trials may include a placebo control arm even when proven treatments for a condition are in use in other parts of the world. Second, the trial researchers or sponsors may fail to make a successful treatment developed through the trial available to either the trial participants or the host community following the trial.Many commentators have argued (...)
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  16. Decision framing in judgment aggregation.Fabrizio Cariani, Marc Pauly & Josh Snyder - 2008 - Synthese 163 (1):1 - 24.
    Judgment aggregation problems are language dependent in that they may be framed in different yet equivalent ways. We formalize this dependence via the notion of translation invariance, adopted from the philosophy of science, and we argue for the normative desirability of translation invariance. We characterize the class of translation invariant aggregation functions in the canonical judgment aggregation model, which requires collective judgments to be complete. Since there are reasonable translation invariant aggregation functions, our result can be viewed as a possibility (...)
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  17.  25
    Appealing to the crowd: ethical justifications in Canadian medical crowdfunding campaigns.Jeremy Snyder, Valorie A. Crooks, Annalise Mathers & Peter Chow-White - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (6):364-367.
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  18.  27
    Finding the music of speech: Musical knowledge influences pitch processing in speech.Christina M. Vanden Bosch der Nederlanden, Erin E. Hannon & Joel S. Snyder - 2015 - Cognition 143 (C):135-140.
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  19.  36
    Racism and sexism in medically assisted conception.Jonathan M. Berkowitz & Jack W. Snyder - 1998 - Bioethics 12 (1):25–44.
    Despite legislation and public education, racism and sexism are alive and well. Though pre‐conceptive gender selection may enhance procreative liberty, this technology presents two disturbing questions. First, does sex selection represent underlying parental sexism? Second, by performing gender selection, do medical professionals perpetuate sexism? It will be maintained that pre‐conceptive sex selection is sexist as it reflects parental anticipation of stereotypical gender based behavior. Perhaps even more incriminating, sex selection forces parents to prefer one sex over another, to place a (...)
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  20.  86
    Easy Rescues and Organ Transplantation.Jeremy Snyder - 2009 - HEC Forum 21 (1):27-53.
    Many people in desperate need of an organ will die on waiting lists for transplantation or face increased morbidity because of their wait. This circumstance is particularly troubling since many viable organs for transplantation go unused when individuals fail to participate in their local organ donation system. In this paper, I consider whether participating in organ transplantation should be considered a form of a rescue of others from the great harms caused by a shortage in transplantable organs. Specifically, I consider (...)
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  21. Perceptions of the Ethics of Medical Tourism: Comparing Patient and Academic Perspectives.J. Snyder, V. A. Crooks & R. Johnston - 2012 - Public Health Ethics 5 (1):38-46.
    Medical tourism is a practice, whereby individuals travel across national borders with the intention of receiving medical care. Medical tourists are motivated to travel abroad by a number of factors, including the affordability of care abroad, access to treatments not available at home, and wait times for care at home. In this article, we share the findings of interviews conducted with 32 Canadian medical tourists with the aim of developing a better understanding of medical tourism, the ethical issues it raises (...)
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  22.  5
    Puns and Poetry in Lucretius' De Rerum Natura.Diskin Clay & J. M. Snyder - 1982 - American Journal of Philology 103 (2):220.
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  23.  29
    How previous experience shapes perception in different sensory modalities.Joel S. Snyder, Caspar M. Schwiedrzik, A. Davi Vitela & Lucia Melloni - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  24.  94
    Beyond sun, sand, and stitches: Assigning responsibility for the Harms of medical tourism.Jeremy Snyder, Valorie Crooks, Rory Johnston & Paul Kingsbury - 2012 - Bioethics 27 (5):233-242.
    Medical tourism (MT) can be conceptualized as the intentional pursuit of non-emergency surgical interventions by patients outside their nation of residence. Despite increasing popular interest in MT, the ethical issues associated with the practice have thus far been under-examined. MT has been associated with a range of both positive and negative effects for medical tourists' home and host countries, and for the medical tourists themselves. Absent from previous explorations of MT is a clear argument of how responsibility for the harms (...)
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  25.  26
    The Concept of Artistic Volition.Erwin Panofsky, Kenneth J. Northcott & Joel Snyder - 1981 - Critical Inquiry 8 (1):17-33.
    Objections arise to the concept of artistic intention based upon the psychology of a period. Here too we experience trends or volitions which can only be explained by precisely those artistic creations which in their own turn demand an explanation on the basis of these trends and volitions. Thus "Gothic" man or the "primitive" from whose alleged existence we wish to explain a particular artistic product is in truth the hypostatized impression which has been culled from the works of art (...)
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  26.  80
    The 'patient's physician one-step removed': the evolving roles of medical tourism facilitators.J. Snyder, V. A. Crooks, K. Adams, P. Kingsbury & R. Johnston - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (9):530-534.
    Background: Medical tourism involves patients travelling internationally to receive medical services. This practice raises a range of ethical issues, including potential harms to the patient's home and destination country and risks to the patient's own health. Medical tourists often engage the services of a facilitator who may book travel and accommodation and link the patient with a hospital abroad. Facilitators have the potential to exacerbate or mitigate the ethical concerns associated with medical tourism, but their roles are poorly understood. -/- (...)
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  27.  30
    How Medical Tourism Enables Preferential Access to Care: Four Patterns from the Canadian Context.Jeremy Snyder, Rory Johnston, Valorie A. Crooks, Jeff Morgan & Krystyna Adams - 2017 - Health Care Analysis 25 (2):138-150.
    Medical tourism is the practice of traveling across international borders with the intention of accessing medical care, paid for out-of-pocket. This practice has implications for preferential access to medical care for Canadians both through inbound and outbound medical tourism. In this paper, we identify four patterns of medical tourism with implications for preferential access to care by Canadians: Inbound medical tourism to Canada’s public hospitals; Inbound medical tourism to a First Nations reserve; Canadian patients opting to go abroad for medical (...)
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  28.  11
    Disregard and Dependency.Jeremy Snyder - 2013 - Business Ethics Journal Review:82-85.
  29.  25
    History of Organ Donation by Patients with Cardiac Death.Michael A. DeVita, James V. Snyder & Ake Grenvik - 1993 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 3 (2):113-129.
    When successful solid organ transplantation was initiated almost 40 years ago, its current success rate was not anticipated. But continuous efforts were undertaken to overcome the two major obstacles to success: injury caused by interrupting nutrient supply to the organ and rejection of the implanted organ by normal host defense mechanisms. Solutions have resulted from technologic medical advances, but also from using organs from different sources. Each potential solution has raised ethical concerns and has variably resulted in societal acclaim, censure, (...)
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  30.  80
    Reflexions on "Las Meninas": Paradox Lost.Joel Snyder & Ted Cohen - 1980 - Critical Inquiry 7 (2):429-447.
    Surely [John R.] Searle must rely on a stable, formal conception of the point of view. He sets Las Meninas on a par with the antimony of the liar and the paradoxes of set theory. But nothing is an antimony or a paradox just because it seems so or just because it is confusing or difficult, even if it seems so to everyone. To deserve such a description, a thing must be, so to speak, intrinsically intractable, not merely resistant when (...)
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  31.  24
    Canadian research ethics board members’ attitudes toward benefits from clinical trials.Kori Cook, Jeremy Snyder & John Calvert - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-7.
    BackgroundWhile ethicists have for many years called for human subject trial participants and, in some cases, local community members to benefit from participation in pharmaceutical and other intervention-based therapies, little is known about how these discussions are impacting the practice of research ethics boards that grant ethical approval to many of these studies.MethodsTelephone interviews were conducted with 23 REB members from across Canada, a major funder country for human subject research internationally. All interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. After (...)
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  32.  29
    Medical Tourism and Bariatric Surgery: More Moral Challenges.Jeremy Snyder & Valorie A. Crooks - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):28-30.
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  33.  22
    Health Misinformation and the Power of Narrative Messaging in the Public Sphere.Timothy Caulfield, Alessandro R. Marcon, Blake Murdoch, Jasmine M. Brown, Sarah Tinker Perrault, Jonathan Jarry, Jeremy Snyder, Samantha J. Anthony, Stephanie Brooks, Zubin Master, Christen Rachul, Ubaka Ogbogu, Joshua Greenberg, Amy Zarzeczny & Robyn Hyde-Lay - 2019 - Canadian Journal of Bioethics / Revue canadienne de bioéthique 2 (2):52-60.
    Numerous social, economic and academic pressures can have a negative impact on representations of biomedical research. We review several of the forces playing an increasingly pernicious role in how health and science information is interpreted, shared and used, drawing discussions towards the role of narrative. In turn, we explore how aspects of narrative are used in different social contexts and communication environments, and present creative responses that may help counter the negative trends. As traditional methods of communication have in many (...)
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  34.  29
    Medical Crowdfunding for Unproven Medical Treatments: Should Gofundme Become a Gatekeeper?Jeremy Snyder & I. Glenn Cohen - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (6):32-38.
    Medical crowdfunding has raised many ethical concerns, among them that it may undermine privacy, widen health inequities, and commodify health care. One motivation for medical crowdfunding has received particular attention among ethicists. Recent studies have shown that many individuals are using crowdfunding to finance access to scientifically unsupported medical treatments. Recently, GoFundMe prohibited campaigns for antivaccination groups on the grounds that they “promote misinformation about vaccines” and for treatment at a German clinic offering unproven cancer treatments due to “the need (...)
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  35.  35
    Response to open Peer commentaries on “Is Health Worker Migration a Case of Poaching?”.Jeremy Snyder - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (3):W1 – W2.
    I would like to thank all of the respondents to my article both for their expansions on the theme of health worker migration and for their criticisms of my argument against the use of the term ’poaching’ in the context of international health worker migration. In this response, I will clarify my argument in light of the worries raised primarily by Tache and Schillinger and Ari Zivotofsky and Naomi Zivotofsky.
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  36.  25
    Procuring Organs from a Non-Heart-Beating Cadaver: A Case Report.Michael A. DeVita, Rade Vukmir, James V. Snyder & Cheryl Graziano - 1993 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 3 (4):371-385.
    Organ transplantation is an accepted therapy for major organ failure, but it depends on the availability of viable organs. Most organs transplanted in the U.S. come from either "brain-dead" or living related donors. Recently organ procurement from patients pronounced dead using cardiopulmonary criteria, so-called "non-heart-beating cadaver donors" (NHBCDs), has been reconsidered. In May 1992, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) enacted a new, complicated policy for procuring organs from NHBCDs after the elective removal of life support. Seventeen months later (...)
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  37. Predatory Pricing.Jeremy Snyder - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Hoboken, NJ: Blackwell.
  38.  26
    Ethics of task shifting in the health workforce: exploring the role of community health workers in HIV service delivery in low- and middle-income countries.Hayley Mundeva, Jeremy Snyder, David Paul Ngilangwa & Angela Kaida - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):71.
    Task shifting is increasingly used to address human resource shortages impacting HIV service delivery in low- and middle-income countries. By shifting basic tasks from higher- to lower-trained cadres, such as Community Health Workers, task shifting can reduce overhead costs, improve community outreach, and provide efficient scale-up of essential treatments like antiretroviral therapies. Although there is rich evidence outlining positive outcomes that CHWs bring into HIV programs, important questions remain over their place in service delivery. These challenges often reflect concerns over (...)
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  39.  36
    New ethical perspectives on medical tourism in the developing world.Jeremy Snyder & Valorie A. Crooks - 2012 - Developing World Bioethics 12 (1):iii-vi.
  40.  15
    Exploitation without Fairness.Jeremy Snyder - 2024 - Res Publica 30 (2):401-421.
    Contemporary accounts of the concept of exploitation can be grouped into camps that tie the wrongness of taking advantage of another person to: (1) the unfair division of benefits resulting from an interaction; (2) excessive benefits resulting from structural injustice; and (3) a failure of respect for others’ humanity. In practice, accounts of exploitation that focus on the fairness of benefits resulting from individual transactions and, to a lesser degree, unjust social and economic institutions have dominated the applied ethics literature (...)
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  41. Benjamin on Reproducibility and Aura: A Reading of "The Work of Art in the Age of its Technical Reproducibility".Joel Snyder - 1983 - Philosophical Forum 15 (1):130.
     
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  42. Res ipsa loquitur.Joel Snyder - 2004 - In Lorraine Daston & Peter Galison (eds.), Things That Talk: Object Lessons From Art and Science. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. pp. 195--221.
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  43.  41
    Reflections on Non-Heartbeating Organ Donation: How 3 Years of Experience Affected the University of Pittsburgh's Ethics Committee's Actions.Michael DeVita, James V. Snyder, Renéee C. Fox & Stuart J. Younger - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (2):285.
    In 1991, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center implemented a policy that permitted the recovery of organs from cadavers pronounced dead using standardized cardiac criteria. This policy allowed families that had made a decision to forgo life sustaining treatment to then request organ donation. This entailed taking the patient to the operating room, discontinuing therapy, and after the patient is pronounced dead, procuring organs.
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  44. Aristophanes' Agathon as Anacreon.Jane Snyder - 1974 - Hermes 102 (2):244-246.
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  45.  58
    "Las Meninas" and the Mirror of the Prince.Joel Snyder - 1985 - Critical Inquiry 11 (4):539-572.
    It is ironic that, with few exceptions, the now vast body of critical literature about Diego Velázquez’s Las Meninas fails to link knowledge to understanding—fails to relate the encyclopedic knowledge we have acquired of its numerous details to a convincing understanding of the painting as a whole. Las Meninas is imposing and monumental; yet a large portion of the literature devoted to it considers only its elements: aspects of its nominal subjects, their biographies, and their roles in the household of (...)
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  46.  48
    The Harmonia of Bow and Lyre in Heraclitus Fr. 51.Jane Mcintosh Snyder - 1984 - Phronesis 29 (1):91-95.
    (People do not understand how what is borne in different directions comes to be in agreement with itself; [for] a framework like that of the bow and the lyre turns back [on itself].).
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  47.  69
    Promoting social responsibility amongst health care users: medical tourists' perspectives on an information sheet regarding ethical concerns in medical tourism.Krystyna Adams, Jeremy Snyder, Valorie A. Crooks & Rory Johnston - 2013 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8:19.
    Medical tourists, persons that travel across international borders with the intention to access non-emergency medical care, may not be adequately informed of safety and ethical concerns related to the practice of medical tourism. Researchers indicate that the sources of information frequently used by medical tourists during their decision-making process may be biased and/or lack comprehensive information regarding individual safety and treatment outcomes, as well as potential impacts of the medical tourism industry on third parties. This paper explores the feedback from (...)
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  48.  22
    Catholic Social Teaching and Global Public Health.Joshua R. Snyder - 2022 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 19 (2):299-319.
    The novel coronavirus and its disease, COVID-19, have revealed how many health systems are ill equipped to respond to a population’s health needs. While the Catholic Church has nearly two thousand years of robust engagement in health care, it has been lacking in the realm of global public health. The Catholic Church’s health care ministries have been preoccupied with responding to illness by offering immediate relief to medical suffering. It is necessary to complement the focus on interpersonal healing by transforming (...)
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  49.  37
    Developing an informational tool for ethical engagement in medical tourism.Krystyna Adams, Jeremy Snyder, Valorie A. Crooks & Rory Johnston - 2017 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 12:4.
    BackgroundMedical tourism, the practice of persons intentionally travelling across international boundaries to access medical care, has drawn increasing attention from researchers, particularly in relation to potential ethical concerns of this practice. Researchers have expressed concern for potential negative impacts to individual safety, public health within both countries of origin for medical tourists and destination countries, and global health equity. However, these ethical concerns are not discussed within the sources of information commonly provided to medical tourists, and as such, medical tourists (...)
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  50.  34
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Relative Versus Absolute Standards for Everyday Risk in Adolescent HIV Prevention Trials: Expanding the Debate”.Jeremy Snyder, Cari L. Miller & Glenda Gray - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):W1 - W3.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page W1-W3, June 2011.
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