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  1.  32
    Stephanie Quinn : Why Vergil? A Collection of Interpretations. Pp. Xxiii + 451. Wauconda, IL: Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, Inc., 2000. Paper $40. ISBN: 0-86516-418-5. [REVIEW]J. S. C. Eidinow - 2001 - The Classical Review 51 (2):398-399.
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  2.  21
    A Note on Horace, Epistles 1.2.26 and 2.2.75.J. S. C. Eidinow - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (2):566-568.
    Scholars have long seen that Horace's treatment of Homer in this Epistle demands to be read in the tradition of moral allegory in which Ulysses becomes the type of the ‘man of virtue’ : on such a reading, Circe becomes an allegory of foolish passion ‘to which Ulysses’ companions give in through their stultitia, and because of which they lose their reason and become no better than animals. Antisthenes, from whose writings such an allegorising approach probably developed, was regarded as (...)
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  3.  19
    William S. Anderson : Why Horace? A Collection of Interpretations. Pp. Xv + 255. Wauconda, IL: Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, Inc., 1999. Paper, $40. ISBN: 0-86516-434-7. [REVIEW]J. S. C. Eidinow - 2001 - The Classical Review 51 (2):399-399.
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  4. A Note on Ovid Ars Amatoria 1.117-19.J. S. C. Eidinow - 1993 - American Journal of Philology 114 (3):413-417.
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  5. Review: Reading Vergil's Aeneid. An Interpretive Guide. [REVIEW]J. S. C. Eidinow - 2002 - The Classical Review 52 (1):60-61.
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  6.  12
    V. G. Kiernan: Horace: Poetics and Politics. Pp. Ix + 204. Basingstoke and London: Macmillan, 1999. Cased, £30. ISBN: 0-333-75471-9. [REVIEW]J. S. C. Eidinow - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (2):601-602.
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  7.  31
    A Guide to the Aeneid C. Perkell (Ed.): Reading Vergil's Aeneid. An Interpretive Guide . Pp. VII + 353. Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press, 1999. Paper. Isbn: 0-8061-3139-X. [REVIEW]J. S. C. Eidinow - 2002 - The Classical Review 52 (01):60-.
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  8.  17
    A FIGURE IN A LANDSCAPE R. Jenkyns: Virgil's Experience. Nature and History: Times, Names and Places . Pp. Xiii + 712. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1998. Cased, £50. ISBN: 0-19-814033-. [REVIEW]J. S. C. Eidinow - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (02):440-.
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  9.  21
    Horace's Epistle to Torquatus (Ep. 1.5).J. S. C. Eidinow - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (01):191-.
    Horace addresses Torquatus again in Carm. 4.7. There the poet distinguishes three cardinal qualities: Torquatus's genus, his facundia, and hispietas. Since Horace distinguishes them they were no doubt qualities on which Torquatus prided himself, but they are, in any case, the key by which Torquatus slips into Horace's lyric. I suggest that we can use the same key to open up the Epistle, and that by taking up these qualities we have ready access to the wit of the poem, carefully (...)
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  10.  20
    V. G. Kiernan: Horace: Poetics and Politics . Pp. Ix + 204. Basingstoke and London: Macmillan, 1999. Cased, £30. ISBN: 0-333-75471-. [REVIEW]J. S. C. Eidinow - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (02):601-.
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  11.  17
    A Note on Horace, Epistles 1.2.26 and 2.2.75.J. S. C. Eidinow - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (02):566-.
    Scholars have long seen that Horace's treatment of Homer in this Epistle demands to be read in the tradition of moral allegory in which Ulysses becomes the type of the ‘man of virtue’ : on such a reading, Circe becomes an allegory of foolish passion ‘to which Ulysses’ companions give in through their stultitia, and because of which they lose their reason and become no better than animals. Antisthenes, from whose writings such an allegorising approach probably developed, was regarded as (...)
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  12.  15
    Dido, Aeneas, and Iulus: Heirship and Obligation in Aeneid 4.J. S. C. Eidinow - 2003 - Classical Quarterly 53 (1):260-267.
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  13.  3
    ‘Purpureo Bibet Ore Nectar’: A Reconsideration.J. S. C. Eidinow - 2000 - Classical Quarterly 50 (2):463-471.
    ‘To attempt to say anything new about Horace may seem absurd.’ To attempt to say anything new about the Roman Odes may seem still more absurd; my purpose, nevertheless, is to reconsider the lines ofCarm. 3.3 set out above, and to reinterpret an argument begun by the editor of the Delphin Horace in which the authority of Bentley is against me. My question is: what does Horace mean the reader to understand by describing Augustus as drinking nectar ‘purpureo ore’?
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  14.  1
    ‘Purpureo Bibet Ore Nectar’: A Reconsideration.J. S. C. Eidinow - 2000 - Classical Quarterly 50 (02):463-.
    ‘To attempt to say anything new about Horace may seem absurd.’ To attempt to say anything new about the Roman Odes may seem still more absurd; my purpose, nevertheless, is to reconsider the lines of Carm. 3.3 set out above, and to reinterpret an argument begun by the editor of the Delphin Horace in which the authority of Bentley is against me. My question is: what does Horace mean the reader to understand by describing Augustus as drinking nectar ‘purpureo ore’?
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