Results for 'J. Don Reeves'

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  1.  34
    Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW]Steven I. Miller, Frank A. Stone, William K. Medlin, Clinton Collins, W. Robert Morford, Marc Belth, John T. Abrahamson, Albert W. Vogel, J. Don Reeves, Richard D. Heyman, K. Armitage, Stewart E. Fraser, Edward R. Beauchamp, Clark C. Gill, Edward J. Nemeth, Gordon C. Ruscoe, Charles H. Lyons, Douglas N. Jackson, Bemman N. Phillips, Melvin L. Silberman, Charles E. Pascal, Richard E. Ripple, Harold Cook, Morris L. Bigge, Irene Athey, Sandra Gadell, John Gadell, Daniel S. Parkinson, Nyal D. Royse & Isaac Brown - 1972 - Educational Studies 3 (1):1-28.
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  2.  13
    Book Reviews Section 1.John Ohlinger, David Conrad, Frederick S. Buchanan, Jack Christensen, Jeffrey Herold, J. Don Reeves, Everett D. Lantz, Ursula Springer, Hardgrave Jr, Noel F. Mcginn, Malcolm B. Campbell, R. J. Woodin, Norman Lederer, Jerry B. Burnell & Rodney Skager - 1973 - Educational Studies 4 (2):65-75.
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  3.  12
    Body and Mind in Western Thought.J. D. Uytman & Joan Wynn Reeves - 1961 - Philosophical Quarterly 11 (42):93.
  4.  12
    Individual Differences in the Ease of Imagining the Faces of Others.J. Don Read & Richard H. Peterson - 1975 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 5 (4):347-349.
  5.  4
    Taking the Historical-Social Dimension Seriously: A Reply to Bandini et al.: E. Bandini, J. S. Reeves, W. D. Snyder, C. Tennie: Clarifying Misconceptions of the Zone of Latent Solutions Hypothesis: A Response to Haidle and Schlaudt.Miriam Noël Haidle & Oliver Schlaudt - 2021 - Biological Theory 16 (2):83-89.
    In our recent article, "Where Does Cumulative Culture Begin? A Plea for a Sociologically Informed Perspective" we commented on a fundamental notion in current approaches to cultural evolution, the “zones of latent solutions”, and proposed a modification of it, namely a social and dynamic interpretation of the latent solutions which were originally introduced within an individualistic framework and as static, genetically fixed entities. This modification seemed, and still seems, relevant to us and, in particular, more adequate for coping with the (...)
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  6.  77
    XIV. Don't Worry, Feel Guilty*: J. David Velleman.J. David Velleman - 2003 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 52:235-248.
    One can feel guilty without thinking that one actually is guilty of moral wrongdoing. For example, one can feel guilty about eating an ice cream or skipping aerobics, even if one doesn't take a moralistic view of self-indulgence. And one can feel guilty about things that aren't one's doing at all, as in the case of survivor's guilt about being spared some catastrophe suffered by others. Guilt without perceived wrongdoing may of course be irrational, but I think it is sometimes (...)
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  7.  53
    Ethical Cognition of Business Students Individually and in Groups.Mohammad J. Abdolmohammadi, David R. L. Gabhart & M. Francis Reeves - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (16):1717-1725.
    This study provides evidence regarding the level of ethical cognition of business students at the entry to college as compared to a national norm. It also provides comparative evidence on the effects of group versus individual ethical cognition upon completion of a business ethics course. The Principled Score (P-score) from the Defining Issues Test (DIT) was used to measure the ethical cognition of a total sample of 301 business students (273 entering students plus 28 students in a business ethics course). (...)
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  8.  77
    Toward a Formal Analysis of Deceptive Signaling.Don Fallis & Peter J. Lewis - 2019 - Synthese (6):2279-2303.
    Deception has long been an important topic in philosophy. However, the traditional analysis of the concept, which requires that a deceiver intentionally cause her victim to have a false belief, rules out the possibility of much deception in the animal kingdom. Cognitively unsophisticated species, such as fireflies and butterflies, have simply evolved to mislead potential predators and/or prey. To capture such cases of “functional deception,” several researchers Machiavellian intelligence II, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 112–143, 1997; Searcy and Nowicki, The (...)
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  9.  47
    The Trouble with Overconfidence.Don A. Moore & Paul J. Healy - 2008 - Psychological Review 115 (2):502-517.
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  10.  21
    Effects of Education and Intervention on Business Students' Ethical Cognition: A Cross Sectional and Longitudinal Study.Mohammad J. Abdolmohammadi & M. Francis Reeves - 2000 - Teaching Business Ethics 4 (3):269-284.
  11.  77
    The Brier Rule Is Not a Good Measure of Epistemic Utility.Don Fallis & Peter J. Lewis - 2016 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (3):576-590.
    Measures of epistemic utility are used by formal epistemologists to make determinations of epistemic betterness among cognitive states. The Brier rule is the most popular choice among formal epistemologists for such a measure. In this paper, however, we show that the Brier rule is sometimes seriously wrong about whether one cognitive state is epistemically better than another. In particular, there are cases where an agent gets evidence that definitively eliminates a false hypothesis, but where the Brier rule says that things (...)
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  12. We Don't Need a Microscope to Explore the Chimpanzee's Mind.Daniel J. Povinelli & Jennifer Vonk - 2004 - Mind and Language 19 (1):1-28.
    The question of whether chimpanzees, like humans, reason about unobservable mental states remains highly controversial. On one account, chimpanzees are seen as possessing a psychological system for social cognition that represents and reasons about behaviors alone. A competing account allows that the chimpanzee's social cognition system additionally construes the behaviors it represents in terms of mental states. Because the range of behaviors that each of the two systems can generate is not currently known, and because the latter system depends upon (...)
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  13. We Don't Need a Microscope to Explore the Chimpanzee's Mind.Daniel J. Povinelli & Jennifer Vonk - 2006 - In Susan L. Hurley & Matthew Nudds (eds.), Rational Animals? Oxford University Press. pp. 1-28.
  14.  20
    Disiecta Membra E. Courtney (ed.): The Fragmentary Latin Poets . Pp. xxv + 504. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993. Cased, £55. ISBN: 0-19-814775-9. J. Blänsdorf (ed.): Fragmenta Poetarum Latinorum epicorum et lyricorum praeter Ennium et Lucilium (post W. Morel novis curis adhibitis edidit Carolus Buechner, editionem tertiam auctam curavit J. B.) (Bibliotheca Scriptorum Graecorum et Romanorum Teubneriana). Pp. xxvi + 494. Stuttgart and Leipzig: B. G. Teubner, 1995. Cased, DM 195. ISBN: 3-8154-1371-. [REVIEW]M. D. Reeve - 1999 - The Classical Review 49 (01):42-.
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  15.  34
    Critical Social Theory Approach to Disclosure of Genomic Incidental Findings.J. L. Bevan, J. N. Senn-Reeves, B. R. Inventor, S. M. Greiner, K. M. Mayer, M. T. Rivard & R. J. Hamilton - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (6):819-828.
    Technology has expanded genomic research and the complexity of extracted gene-related information. Health-related genomic incidental findings pose new dilemmas for nurse researchers regarding the ethical application of disclosure to participants. Consequently, informed consent specific to incidental findings is recommended. Critical Social Theory is used as a guide in recognition of the changing meaning of informed consent and to serve as a framework to inform nursing of the ethical application of disclosure consent in genomic nursing research practices.
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  16.  13
    Does Group Reasoning Improve Ethical Reasoning?Mohammad J. Abdolmohammadi & M. Francis Reeves - 2003 - Business and Society Review 108 (1):127-137.
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  17.  13
    Spinoza.Don Garrett & R. J. Delahunty - 1987 - Philosophical Review 96 (4):610.
  18.  23
    Wolf Prolegomena to Homer, 1795. Trans, with Introd. And Notes by A. Grafton, G. W. Most, and J. E. G. Zetzcl. Princeton: University Press, 1985. Pp. Xiv + 265. £30.20. [REVIEW]M. D. Reeve, F. A. Wolf, A. Grafton, G. W. Most & J. E. G. Zetzel - 1988 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 108:219-221.
  19.  26
    Dialogic Authority.J. Cunliffe & A. Reeve - 1999 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 19 (3):453-466.
    This paper discusses the compatibility of authority and autonomy. It makes a distinction between 'deference authority', and 'dialogic authority', which is proposed as an understanding of authority with three advantages over undifferentiated accounts. First, 'dialogic authority' is better able to reconcile autonomy with authority. Secondly, it provides conceptual space for accountability, space diminished or excluded by deference authority. Thirdly, it captures the experience of authority-subjects attempting to preserve autonomy.
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  20. Why Ethical Consumers Don’T Walk Their Talk: Towards a Framework for Understanding the Gap Between the Ethical Purchase Intentions and Actual Buying Behaviour of Ethically Minded Consumers.Michal J. Carrington, Benjamin A. Neville & Gregory J. Whitwell - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (1):139-158.
    Despite their ethical intentions, ethically minded consumers rarely purchase ethical products (Auger and Devinney: 2007, Journal of Business Ethics 76, 361-383). This intentions-behaviour gap is important to researchers and industry, yet poorly understood (Belk et al.: 2005, Consumption, Markets and Culture 8(3), 275-289). In order to push the understanding of ethical consumption forward, we draw on what is known about the intention— behaviour gap from the social psychology and consumer behaviour literatures and apply these insights to ethical consumerism. We bring (...)
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  21.  10
    Why Don’T You Go to Bed on Time? A Daily Diary Study on the Relationships Between Chronotype, Self-Control Resources and the Phenomenon of Bedtime Procrastination.Jana Kühnel, Christine J. Syrek & Anne Dreher - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  22. J. S. Mill on What We Don't Know About Women: G. W. Smith.G. W. Smith - 2000 - Utilitas 12 (1):41-61.
    Mill's feminism has been attacked as being logically incoherent. The general verdict has been that Mill can easily be defended from the charge. However, both sides in the debate have ignored the fact that his feminism is part of a broader theory of liberal empiricism. Placing The Subjection of Women in this context re–opens the question of its logical credentials and reveals a basic weakness in Millian feminism.
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  23. Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics: An Empirical Investigation of the Concept of Lying.Adam J. Arico & Don Fallis - 2013 - Philosophical Psychology 26 (6):790 - 816.
    There are many philosophical questions surrounding the notion of lying. Is it ever morally acceptable to lie? Can we acquire knowledge from people who might be lying to us? More fundamental, however, is the question of what, exactly, constitutes the concept of lying. According to one traditional definition, lying requires intending to deceive (Augustine. (1952). Lying (M. Muldowney, Trans.). In R. Deferrari (Ed.), Treatises on various subjects (pp. 53?120). New York, NY: Catholic University of America). More recently, Thomas Carson (2006. (...)
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  24.  6
    Papa Don’t Preach?Dax J. Kellie, Barnaby J. W. Dixson & Robert C. Brooks - 2020 - Human Nature 31 (3):222-248.
    The suppression of sexuality is culturally widespread, and women’s sexual promiscuity, activity, and enjoyment are almost always judged and punished more harshly than men’s. It remains disputed, however, to what end people suppress sexuality, and who benefits from the suppression of female sexuality. Different theories predict that women in general, men in general, women’s intimate partners, or parents benefit most. Here we use the lies women and men tell—or imagine telling—about their sexual histories as an indirect measure of who is (...)
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  25.  47
    Protoalgebraic Logics.W. J. Blok & Don Pigozzi - 1986 - Studia Logica 45 (4):337 - 369.
    There exist important deductive systems, such as the non-normal modal logics, that are not proper subjects of classical algebraic logic in the sense that their metatheory cannot be reduced to the equational metatheory of any particular class of algebras. Nevertheless, most of these systems are amenable to the methods of universal algebra when applied to the matrix models of the system. In the present paper we consider a wide class of deductive systems of this kind called protoalgebraic logics. These include (...)
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  26. Correspondance Anglaise.Alexis de Tocqueville, J. P. Mayer, Gustave Rudler, Hugh Brogan & Henry Reeve - 1954
     
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  27.  28
    310 Name Index Cockburn, Claud 68 Collins, S. 208, 210 Comaroff, J. 272.Auguste Comte, J. Daniel, Basil Davidson, Merryl Wyn Davies, W. D. Davies, David De Silva, P. A. Deiros, K. N. O. Dharmadasa, C. G. Diehl & E. Don-Yehiya - 1995 - In Wendy James (ed.), The Pursuit of Certainty: Religious and Cultural Formulations. Routledge.
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  28.  7
    Lancastrian Englishmen. A. C. Reeves.J. Lander - 1983 - Speculum 58 (2):524-525.
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  29. Don’T Forget Forgetting: The Social Epistemic Importance of How We Forget.Daniel J. Singer, Aaron Bramson, Patrick Grim, Bennett Holman, Karen Kovaka, Jiin Jung & William Berger - 2019 - Synthese 198 (6):5373-5394.
    We motivate a picture of social epistemology that sees forgetting as subject to epistemic evaluation. Using computer simulations of a simple agent-based model, we show that how agents forget can have as large an impact on group epistemic outcomes as how they share information. But, how we forget, unlike how we form beliefs, isn’t typically taken to be the sort of thing that can be epistemically rational or justified. We consider what we take to be the most promising argument for (...)
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  30.  14
    Shao Yong's Numerological-Cosmological System.Don J. Wyatt - 2010 - In John Makeham (ed.), Dao Companion to Neo-Confucian Philosophy. Springer. pp. 17--37.
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  31.  24
    Review: Don Davis Roberts, The Existential Graphs and Natural Deduction. [REVIEW]J. Jay Zeman - 1970 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 35 (2):320-321.
  32.  6
    Reasonable and Rational: Renewed Loci for Rhetorical Justice.Don J. Kraemer - 2016 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 49 (2):173-195.
    Normative philosophy believes that argumentation concerning values is rational because there is a deeper value to which all are committed. Citing Ronald Dworkin’s 1977’s Taking Rights Seriously, Will Kymlicka suggests that this “ultimate value” is equality. Having a standard enables rationality because it enables competing theories to show “that one of the theories does a better job living up to the standard that they all recognize”. The measure for whether an argument weighs as much as it claims is how well (...)
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  33. Don Ihde and Hugh J. Silverman, Eds., Descriptions Reviewed By.Peter Smale - 1986 - Philosophy in Review 6 (8):381-383.
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  34.  1
    Learning Reward Frequency Over Reward Probability: A Tale of Two Learning Rules.Hilary J. Don, A. Ross Otto, Astin C. Cornwall, Tyler Davis & Darrell A. Worthy - 2019 - Cognition 193:104042.
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  35. Don't Count Me In' : Derrida's Refraining.J. Hillis Miller - 2007 - In Simon Wortham & Allison Weiner (eds.), Encountering Derrida: Legacies and Futures of Deconstruction. Continuum.
     
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  36.  8
    The Ministrel and the Don.Jhon Baptist Reeves - 1927 - New Blackfriars 8 (82):47-52.
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  37.  6
    Dancers onKnifePoints: ConfucianLives andAfterlives inChina'sCautionaryTradition ofReform.Don J. Wyatt - 2010 - Intellectual History Review 16 (1):155-164.
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  38.  55
    Don’T Forget Forgetting: The Social Epistemic Importance of How We Forget.Daniel J. Singer, Aaron Bramson, Patrick Grim, Bennett Holman, Karen Kovaka, Jiin Jung & William J. Berger - 2019 - Synthese 198 (6):5373-5394.
    We motivate a picture of social epistemology that sees forgetting as subject to epistemic evaluation. Using computer simulations of a simple agent-based model, we show that how agents forget can have as large an impact on group epistemic outcomes as how they share information. But, how we forget, unlike how we form beliefs, isn’t typically taken to be the sort of thing that can be epistemically rational or justified. We consider what we take to be the most promising argument for (...)
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  39.  12
    The Reasonable and the Sensible: Toward a Rhetorical Theory of Justice.Don J. Kraemer - 2013 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 46 (2):207-230.
    Rhetoric, like any other practice, is always to be used to serve the ends of justice, and for that alone.People will be responsible for the needs of others only when they are responsive to the feelings of need, anxiety, and desire in real other people who work in real material conditions. This direct response will take place only when people are fully responsive to, and fully responsible for, their own feelings. This responsibility for individual feeling, for full complexity and depth (...)
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  40.  19
    Animal Deception and the Content of Signals.Don Fallis & Peter J. Lewis - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 87:114-124.
    In cases of animal mimicry, the receiver of the signal learns the truth that he is either dealing with the real thing or with a mimic. Thus, despite being a prototypical example of animal deception, mimicry does not seem to qualify as deception on the traditional definition, since the receiver is not actually misled. We offer a new account of propositional content in sender-receiver games that explains how the receiver is misled by mimicry. We show that previous accounts of deception, (...)
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  41. New Books. [REVIEW]J. Gosling, Alan R. White, John Arthur Passmore, William Kneale, Don Locke, C. K. Grant, Thomas McPherson, Peter Nidditch, Martha Kneale, A. C. Ewing & W. F. Hicken - 1965 - Mind 74 (293):126-153.
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  42.  59
    International Trade and Health Policy: Implications of the GATS for US Healthcare Reform.Patricia J. Arnold & Terrie C. Reeves - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 63 (4):313-332.
    This paper examines the implications of the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), the World Trade Organization’s agreement governing trade in health-related services, for health policy and healthcare reform in the United States. The paper describes the nature and scope of US obligations under the GATS, the ways in which the trade agreement intersects with domestic health policy, and the institutional factors that mediate trade-offs between health and trade policy. The analysis suggests that the GATS provisions on market access, (...)
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  43.  52
    Adolescents Care but Don’T Feel Responsible for Farm Animal Welfare.Siobhan M. Abeyesinghe, Jen Jamieson, Lucy Asher, David Allen, Matthew O. Parker, Christopher M. Wathes & Michael J. Reiss - 2015 - Society and Animals 23 (3):269-297.
  44. I Don't Think So: Pinker on the Mentalese Monopoly.David J. Cole - 1999 - Philosophical Psychology 12 (3):283-295.
    Stephen Pinker sets out over a dozen arguments in The language instinct (Morrow, New York, 1994) for his widely shared view that natural language is inadequate as a medium for thought. Thus he argues we must suppose that the primary medium of thought and inference is an innate propositional representation system, mentalese. I reply to the various arguments and so defend the view that some thought essentially involves natural language. I argue mentalese doesn't solve any of the problems Pinker cites (...)
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  45.  2
    Don't Make a Problem of Anything: Discussions with J. Krishnamurti.Jiddu Krishnamurti - 2007 - Krishnamurti Foundation India.
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  46. Don't Make a Problem of Anything: Discussions with J. Krishnamurti.Jiddu Krishnamurti - 2007 - Krishnamurti Foundation India.
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  47. Acknowledgment of External Reviewers.Zoubeida Dagher, Charles J. Linder, Barbara J. Reeves, Maria Cecilia Gramajo, Dick Gunstone, Gregory J. Kelly, HsingChi A. Wang, Hugh Lacey, Robin H. Millar & Hans E. Fischer - 2004 - Science & Education 13:153-154.
  48.  29
    Wild Bodies Don't Need to Perceive, Detect, Capture, or Create Meaning: They ARE Meaning.J. Scott Jordan, Vincent T. Cialdella, Alex Dayer, Matthew D. Langley & Zachery Stillman - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
  49. Don’T Stop Believing (Hold Onto That Warm Fuzzy Feeling).Edward J. R. Elliott & Jessica Isserow - 2021 - Ethics 132 (1):4-37.
    If beliefs are a map by which we steer, then, ceteris paribus, we should want a more accurate map. However, the world could be structured so as to punish learning with respect to certain topics—by learning new information, one’s situation could be worse than it otherwise would have been. We investigate whether the world is structured so as to punish learning specifically about moral nihilism. We ask, if an ordinary person had the option to learn the truth about moral nihilism, (...)
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  50.  54
    Don’T Worry, Be Stoic: Ancient Wisdom for Troubled Times, by Peter J. Vernezze. [REVIEW]William O. Stephens - 2007 - Ancient Philosophy 27 (2):452-456.
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