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John Dillon [188]John M. Dillon [36]J. Dillon [11]J. M. Dillon [5]
James Dillon [3]J. T. Dillon [3]J. J. Dillon [2]Jim T. Dillon [2]

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James Dillon
University of Manchester
  1. .John Dillon - 1989 - Cambridge University Press.
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  2.  43
    The Heirs of Plato: A Study of the Old Academy.John M. Dillon - 2003 - Oxford, GB: Clarendon Press.
    The Heirs of Plato is the first full study of the various directions in philosophy taken by Plato's followers in the first seventy years after his death in 347 BC - the period generally known as 'The Old Academy', unjustly neglected by historians of philosophy. Lucid and accessible, John Dillon's book provides an introductory chapter on the school itself, and a summary of Plato's philosophical heritage, before looking at each of the school heads and other chief characters, exploring both what (...)
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  3.  40
    The heirs of Plato: a study of the Old Academy, 347-274 B.C.John M. Dillon - 2003 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    The Heirs of Plato is the first book exclusively devoted to an in-depth study of the various directions in philosophy taken by Plato's followers in the first seventy years or so following his death in 347 BC--the period generally known as 'The Old Academy'. Speusippus, Xenocrates, and Polemon, the three successive heads of the Academy in this period, though personally devoted to the memory of Plato, were independent philosophers in their own right, and felt free to develop his heritage in (...)
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  4.  77
    Alcinous: The Handbook of Platonism.John Dillon (ed.) - 1993 - New York: Clarendon Press.
    John Dillon presents an English translation of Alcinous' Handbook of Platonism, accompanied by an introduction and a philosophical commentary which explain the ideas in the work and show their intellectual and historical context. The Handbook purports to be an introduction to the doctrines of Plato, but in fact gives us an excellent survey of Platonist thought in the second century AD.
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  5. The Heirs of Plato. A Study of the Old Academy.John Dillon - 2005 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 67 (3):568-570.
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  6. Iamblichi Chalcidensis In Platonis Dialogos Commentariorum fragmenta.John M. Dillon - 1973 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 35 (3):633-634.
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  7.  76
    Iamblichi Chalcidensis in Platonis dialogos commentariorum fragmenta.John M. Dillon - 1973 - Leiden,: Brill. Edited by Iamblichus.
    The fragments of Iamblichus' commentaries on Plato's dialogues (Sophist, Phaedo, Phaedrus and Timaeus). Greek text with English translation and notes.
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  8.  11
    Proclus' Commentary on Plato's Parmenides.Glenn R. Morrow & John M. Dillon (eds.) - 1992 - Princeton University Press.
    This is the first English translation of Proclus' commentary on Plato's Parmenides. Glenn Morrow's death occurred while he was less than halfway through the translation, which was completed by John Dillon. A major work of the great Neoplatonist philosopher, the commentary is an intellectual tour de force that greatly influenced later medieval and Renaissance thought. As the notes and introductory summaries explain, it comprises a full account of Proclus' own metaphysical system, disguised, as is so much Neoplatonic philosophy, in the (...)
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  9. Alcinous: The Handbook of Platonism.John Dillon - 1999 - Mind 108 (431):575-579.
    John Dillon presents an English translation of Alcinous' Handbook of Platonism, accompanied by an introduction and a philosophical commentary which explain the ideas in the work and show their intellectual and historical context. The Handbook purports to be an introduction to the doctrines of Plato, but in fact gives us an excellent survey of Platonist thought in the second century AD.
     
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  10.  54
    The middle platonists: a study of platonism, 80 B.C. to A.D. 220.John M. Dillon - 1977 - London: Duckworth.
    'Middle Platonists' is a work that focuses on the period of intellectual activity which flourished from the time of the "dogmatist" Antiochus Aschalon (ca. 80 BC) to Ammonius Saccas (ca. 220 AD), the mysterious "teacher" of the great Plotinus.
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  11.  41
    Damascius on the Ineffable.John Dillon - 1996 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 78 (2):120-129.
  12.  6
    How does the soul direct the body, after all? Traces of a dispute on mind-body relations in the Old Academy.John Dillon - 2009 - In Dorothea Frede & Burkhard Reis (eds.), Body and Soul in Ancient Philosophy. De Gruyter. pp. 349-358.
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  13.  6
    Alcinous: The Handbook of Platonism.John Dillon (ed.) - 1995 - Clarendon Press.
    John Dillon presents an English translation of Alcinous' Handbook of Platonism, accompanied by an introduction and a philosophical commentary which explain the ideas in the work and show their intellectual and historical context. The Handbook purports to be an introduction to the doctrines of Plato, but in fact gives us an excellent survey of Platonist thought in the second century AD.
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  14. Tampering with the Timaeus: Ideological Emendations in Plato, with Special Reference to the Timaeus.John Dillon - 1989 - American Journal of Philology 110 (1):50-72.
  15. The Greek Sophists.John M. Dillon & Tania Gergel (eds.) - 2003 - New York: Penguin Books.
    The Sophists, who rose to prominence in democratic Athens during the mid-fifth century b.c., understood the art of rhetoric and the importance of being able to transform effective reasoning into persuasive public speaking. Their inquiries-into the gods, the origins of religion, and whether virtue can be taught-influenced the next generation of classical philosophers and formed the foundations of the European prose style and formal oratory. In this new translation each chapter is organized around the work of one character, including Gorgias, (...)
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  16. The personal is the political.Jacqui Dillon - 2011 - In Joanna Moncrieff, Mark Rapley & Jacqui Dillon (eds.), De-Medicalizing Misery: Psychiatry, Psychology and the Human Condition. Palgrave-Macmillan.
     
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  17.  21
    De-medicalizing misery: psychiatry, psychology and the human condition.Mark Rapley, Joanna Moncrieff & Jacqui Dillon (eds.) - 2011 - New York, NY: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: -- Notes on Contributors -- Preface; R.Dallos -- Carving Nature at its Joints? DSM and the Medicalization of Everyday Life; M.Rapley, J.Moncrieff&J.Dillon -- Dualisms and the Myth of Mental Illness; P.Thomas&P.Bracken -- Making the World Go Away, and How Psychology and Psychiatry Benefit; M.Boyle -- Cultural Diversity and Racism: An Historical Perspective; S.Fernando -- The Social Context of Paranoia; D.J.Harper -- From 'Bad Character' to BPD: The Medicalization of 'Personality Disorder'; J.Bourne -- Medicalizing Masculinity; S.Timimi -- (...)
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  18.  10
    Platonic Theories of Prayer.John M. Dillon & Andrei Timotin (eds.) - 2015 - Boston: Brill.
    is a collection of ten essays on the topic of prayer in the later Platonic tradition. Composed by a panel of distinguished scholars, they offer a comprehensive view of the various roles and levels of prayer characteristic of this period.
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  19.  11
    A Platonist Ars Amatoria.John Dillon - 1994 - Classical Quarterly 44 (2):387-392.
    The concept of an ‘art of love’ has been popularised for all time by the naughty masterpiece of Ovid. A good deal of critical attention has been devoted to this work in recent times, including some to his possible sources, but under this latter rubric attention has chiefly been directed rather to his parody of more serious types of handbook, such as an ars medica, an ars grammatica, or an ars rhetorica, than to the possibility of his having predecessors in (...)
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  20.  17
    Iamblichus of Chalcis.John Dillon - 1987 - In Wolfgang Haase (ed.), Philosophie, Wissenschaften, Technik. Philosophie. De Gruyter. pp. 862-910.
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  21.  25
    Speusippus in Iamblichus.John Dillon - 1984 - Phronesis 29 (3):325-332.
  22. The ideas as thoughts of God.John Dillon & Daniel J. Tolan - 2020 - In Alexander J. B. Hampton & John Peter Kenney (eds.), Christian Platonism: A History. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  23.  13
    The New Cambridge Companion to Plotinus, edited by Lloyd P. Gerson & James Wilberding.John Dillon - forthcoming - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition:1-4.
  24.  5
    The Roots of Platonism : The Origins and Chief Features of a Philosophical Tradition.John M. Dillon - 2018 - New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
    How does a school of thought, in the area of philosophy, or indeed of religion, from roots that may be initially open-ended and largely informal, come to take on the features that later mark it out as distinctive, and even exclusive? That is the theme which is explored in this book in respect of the philosophical movement known as Platonism, stemming as it does from the essentially open-ended and informal atmosphere of Plato's Academy. John Dillon focuses on a number of (...)
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  25.  16
    A Platonist Ars Amatoria.John Dillon - 1994 - Classical Quarterly 44 (02):387-.
    The concept of an ‘art of love’ has been popularised for all time by the naughty masterpiece of Ovid. A good deal of critical attention has been devoted to this work in recent times, including some to his possible sources, but under this latter rubric attention has chiefly been directed rather to his parody of more serious types of handbook, such as an ars medica, an ars grammatica, or an ars rhetorica, than to the possibility of his having predecessors in (...)
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  26.  25
    Iamblichus and the Origin of the Doctrine of Henads.John M. Dillon - 1972 - Phronesis 17 (2):102-106.
  27. Image, Symbol and Analogy: Three Basic Concepts of Neoplatonic Allegorical Exegesis.John Dillon - 1976 - In R. Baine Harris (ed.), The Significance of Neoplatonism. State University of New York Press. pp. 247--262.
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  28.  17
    Porphyrius: Sententiae ad intelligibilia ducentes.John Dillon & E. Lamberz - 1976 - American Journal of Philology 97 (4):421.
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  29.  15
    The Middle Platonists. A Study of Platonism, 80 B.C. to A.D.Georg Luck & John Dillon - 1980 - American Journal of Philology 101 (3):374.
  30.  11
    Neoplatonic Philosophy: Introductory Readings.Lloyd Gerson & John M. Dillon - 2004 - Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Press.
    The most comprehensive collection of Neoplatonic writings available in English, this volume provides translations of the central texts of four major figures of the Neoplatonic tradition: Plotinus, Porphyry, Iamblichus, and Proclus. The general Introduction gives an overview of the period and takes a brief but revealing look at the history of ancient philosophy from the viewpoint of the Neoplatonists. Historical background--essential for understanding these powerful, difficult, and sometimes obscure thinkers--is provided in extensive footnotes, which also include cross-references to other works (...)
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  31.  89
    Apuleius and the Metamorphoses of Platonism, written by Claudio Moreschini.John M. Dillon - 2018 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 12 (2):190-192.
  32.  9
    Iamblichus de Anima: Text, Translation, and Commentary.John F. Finamore & John M. Dillon - 2002 - Atlanta, Ga.: Brill. Edited by John F. Finamore & John M. Dillon.
    Iamblichus , successor to Plotinus and Porphyry, brought a new religiosity to Neoplatonism. This edition of the fragments of Iamblichus' major work on the soul, De Anima, is accompanied by the first English translation of the work and a commentary.
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  33.  14
    Iamblichus, De mysteriis. Iamblichus, Emma C. Clarke, John M. Dillon & Jackson P. Hershbell - 2004 - Boston: Brill. Edited by Emma C. Clarke, John M. Dillon & Jackson P. Hershbell.
    On the text and translation of the De mysteriis -- Iamblichus the man -- The De mysteriis : a defence of theurgy, and an answer to Porphyry's letter to Anebo -- Iamblichus's knowledge of Egyptian religion and mythology -- The nature and contents of De mysteriis -- Iamblichus, De mysteriis : text and translation.
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  34.  20
    Paideia Platonikê: Does the later platonist programme of education retain any validity today?John Dillon - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):597-604.
    During the Middle Platonic period, from the second-century CE on, and in a more elaborately structured way from the time of Iamblichus on, the Platonist Schools of later antiquity took their students through a fixed sequence of Platonic dialogues, beginning with the Alcibiades I, concerned as it was with the theme of self-knowledge, and ending—at least in the later period—with the Timaeus and Parmenides, representing the two ‘pinnacles’ of Platonic philosophy, concerned with the physical and intelligible realms, respectively. There seems (...)
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  35.  24
    Humanism vs. competency: Traditional and contemporary models of education.Marie-Élise Zovko & John Dillon - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):554-564.
  36.  29
    Plato's Philebus: selected papers from the Eighth Symposium Platonicum.John M. Dillon & Luc Brisson (eds.) - 2010 - Sankt Augustin: Academia.
  37. Iamblichus and henads again.John Dillon - 1993 - In H. J. Blumenthal & Gillian Clark (eds.), The Divine Iamblichus: Philosopher and Man of Gods. Bristol Classical Press.
     
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  38. The Timaeus in the Old Academy.John Dillon - 2003 - In Gretchen J. Reydams-Schils (ed.), Plato's Timaeus as Cultural Icon. University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 80-94.
  39. Paideia Platonikê: Does the later Platonist programme of education retain any validity today?John Dillon - 2017 - Schole 11 (2):321-332.
    The question I wish to address on this occasion is whether the Platonic course of study retains any validity in the modern world. I shall argue that some version of it indeed might, though by no means for everybody. A course of education, after all, which begins with the rules for rational thought and argumentation, then turns to the question of the true nature of the self, followed by a consideration of the nature of ethics, politics, physics and metaphysics, should (...)
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  40.  19
    The Question of "Eclecticism": Studies in Later Greek Philosophy.John M. Dillon & A. A. Long (eds.) - 1988 - University of California Press.
    This collection of essays is addressed to the growing number of philosophers, classicists, and intellectual historians who are interested in the development of Greek thought after Aristotle. In nine original studies, the authors explore the meaning and history of "eclecticism" in the context of ancient philosophy. The book casts fresh light on the methodology of such central figures as Cicero, Philo, Plutarch, Sextus Empiricus, and Ptolemy, and also illuminates many of the conceptual issues discussed most creatively in this period.
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  41.  5
    Comments on John Moore's Paper.John Dillon - 1973 - In J. M. E. Maravcsik (ed.), Patterns in Plato's Thought. Dordrecht: Reidel. pp. 72--77.
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  42.  20
    Damascius on Procession and Return.John Dillon & D. Winston - 1997 - In John J. Cleary (ed.), The Perennial Tradition of Neoplatonism. Leuven University Press.
  43.  46
    Logos and Trinity: Patterns of Platonist Influence on Early Christianity.John Dillon - 1989 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lecture Series 25:1-13.
    I think it would be generally agreed that the two surest ways of getting into serious trouble in Christian circles in the first three or four centuries of the Church's existence were to engage in speculation either on the nature of Christ the Son and his relation to his Father, or on the mutual relations of the members of the Trinity. While passions have cooled somewhat in the intervening centuries, these are still now subjects which a Classical scholar must approach (...)
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  44.  46
    Salomon Ibn Gabirol’s Doctrine of Intelligible Matter.John Dillon - 1989 - Irish Philosophical Journal 6 (1):59-81.
  45. The Effect of Questions in Education and Other Enterprises.J. T. Dillon - 1982 - Journal of Curriculum Studies 14 (2):127--152.
     
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  46.  9
    Time and Cosmology in Plato and the Platonic Tradition. Edited by Daniel Vasquez and Alberto Ross.John Dillon - 2023 - Ancient Philosophy 43 (2):555-557.
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  47. Logos and Trinity: Patterns of Platonist Influence on Early Christianity IN The Philosophy in Christianity.John Dillon - 1989 - In . Cambridge University Press.
    A study of the influence of Platonism on two central areas of Early Christian doctrine, the relation of God the Son to the Father, and the mutual relations of the persons of the Trinity. In the former case, logos-theory and the figure of the demiurge are important; the latter, particularly Porphyry’s theory of the relation between Being, Life and Mind.
     
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  48. On Aristotle Metaphysics 1.W. E. Dooley, Dexippus & J. Dillon - 1992 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 54 (3):540-542.
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  49. Iamblichus and the foundations of late platonism.Eugene Afonasin, John M. Dillon & John Finamore (eds.) - 2012 - Boston: Brill.
    Drawing on recent scholarship and delving systematically into Iamblichean texts, these ten papers establish Iamblichus as the great innovator of Neoplatonic philosophy who broadened its appeal for future generations of philosophers.
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  50.  5
    Philo of Alexandria, On the life of Abraham: introduction, translation, and commentary.Ellen Birnbaum & John M. Dillon (eds.) - 2020 - Boston: Brill.
    On the Life of Abraham displays Philo's philosophical, exegetical, and literary genius at its best. Philo begins by introducing the biblical figures Enos, Enoch, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob as unwritten laws. Then, interweaving literal, ethical, and allegorical interpretations, Philo presents the life and achievements of Abraham, founder of the Jewish nation, in the form of a Greco-Roman bios, or biography. Ellen Birnbaum and John Dillon explain why and how this work is important within the context of Philo's own oeuvre, (...)
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