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Joseph T. Clark [79]John Clark [34]John A. Clark [20]John P. Clark [16]
J. F. M. Clark [13]J. Clark [12]John R. Clark [9]John Maurice Clark [9]

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  1. To see or not to see: The need for attention to perceive changes in scenes.Ronald A. Rensink, J. Kevin O'Regan & James J. Clark - 1997 - Psychological Science 8:368-373.
    When looking at a scene, observers feel that they see its entire structure in great detail and can immediately notice any changes in it. However, when brief blank fields are placed between alternating displays of an original and a modified scene, a striking failure of perception is induced: identification of changes becomes extremely difficult, even when changes are large and made repeatedly. Identification is much faster when a verbal cue is provided, showing that poor visibility is not the cause of (...)
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  2. The Astonishing Hypothesis.Francis Crick & J. Clark - 1994 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 1 (1):10-16.
    [opening paragraph] -- Clark: The `astonishing hypothesis' which you put forward in your book, and which you obviously feel is very controversial, is that `You, your joys and sorrows, your memories and ambitions, your sense of personal identity and free will are, in fact, no more than the behaviour of a vast assembly of nerve cells. As Lewis Carroll's Alice might have phrased it: `You're nothing but a pack of neurons'.' But it seems to me that this is not so (...)
     
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  3.  30
    Aristotle's Syllogistic from the Standpoint of Modern Formal Logic.Joseph T. Clark & Jan Lukasiewicz - 1952 - Philosophical Review 61 (4):575.
  4. Picture changes during blinks: Looking without seeing and seeing without looking.J. Kevin O'Regan, H. Deubel, James J. Clark & Ronald A. Rensink - 2000 - Visual Cognition 7:191-211.
    Observers inspected normal, high quality color displays of everyday visual scenes while their eye movements were recorded. A large display change occurred each time an eye blink occurred. Display changes could either involve "Central Interest" or "Marginal Interest" locations, as determined from descriptions obtained from independent judges in a prior pilot experiment. Visual salience, as determined by luminance, color, and position of the Central and Marginal interest changes were equalized. -/- The results obtained were very similar to those obtained in (...)
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  5.  70
    Change blindness as a result of mudsplashes.Kevin J. O'Regan, Ronald A. Rensink & James J. Clark - 1999 - Nature 398 (6722):34-34.
    Change-blindness occurs when large changes are missed under natural viewing conditions because they occur simultaneously with a brief visual disruption, perhaps caused by an eye movement, a flicker, a blink, or a camera cut in a film sequence. We have found that this can occur even when the disruption does not cover or obscure the changes. When a few small, high-contrast shapes are briefly spattered over a picture, like mudsplashes on a car windscreen, large changes can be made simultaneously in (...)
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  6. Relations of homology between higher cognitive emotions and basic emotions.Jason A. Clark - 2010 - Biology and Philosophy 25 (1):75-94.
    In the last 10 years, several authors including Griffiths and Matthen have employed classificatory principles from biology to argue for a radical revision in the way that we individuate psychological traits. Arguing that the fundamental basis for classification of traits in biology is that of ‘homology’ (similarity due to common descent) rather than ‘analogy’, or ‘shared function’, and that psychological traits are a special case of biological traits, they maintain that psychological categories should be individuated primarily by relations of homology (...)
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  7. On the failure to detect changes in scenes across brief interruptions.Ronald A. Rensink, Kevin J. O'Regan & James J. Clark - 2000 - Visual Cognition 7 (1/2/3):127-145.
    When brief blank fields are placed between alternating displays of an original and a modified scene, a striking failure of perception is induced: the changes become extremely difficult to notice, even when they are large, presented repeatedly, and the observer expects them to occur (Rensink, O'Regan, & Clark, 1997). To determine the mechanisms behind this induced "change blindness", four experiments examine its dependence on initial preview and on the nature of the interruptions used. Results support the proposal that representations at (...)
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  8.  22
    The sustainability of ideals, values and the nursing mandate: evidence from a longitudinal qualitative study.Jill Maben, Sue Latter & Jill Macleod Clark - 2007 - Nursing Inquiry 14 (2):99-113.
    This article reports on research that examines newly qualified UK nurses’ experiences of implementing their ideals and values in contemporary nursing practice. Findings are presented from questionnaire and interview data from a longitudinal interpretive study of nurses’ trajectories over time. On qualification nurses emerged with a coherent and strong set of espoused ideals around delivering high quality, patient‐centred, holistic and evidence‐based care. These were consistent with the current UK nursing mandate and had been transmitted and reinforced throughout their ‘prequalification’ programmes. (...)
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  9.  18
    The power to convene: making sense of the power of food movement organizations in governance processes in the Global North.Jill K. Clark, Kristen Lowitt, Charles Z. Levkoe & Peter Andrée - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):175-191.
    Dominant food systems, based on industrial methods and corporate control, are in a state of flux. To enable the transition towards more sustainable and just food systems, food movements are claiming new roles in governance. These movements, and the initiatives they spearhead, are associated with a range of labels (e.g., food sovereignty, food justice, and community food security) and use a variety of strategies to enact change. In this paper, we use the concept of relational fields to conduct a post-hoc (...)
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  10.  42
    Social Control of Business.John Maurice Clark - 1926 - International Journal of Ethics 37 (1):101-102.
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  11. Research on advertising ethics: Past, present, and future.M. R. Hyman, R. Tansey & J. W. Clark - 1994 - Journal of Advertising 23:5--15.
     
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  12.  55
    Approaches to child labour in the supply chain.Diana Winstanley, Joanna Clark & Helena Leeson - 2002 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 11 (3):210–223.
    This paper examines the difficulties of dealing with child labour in the supply chain. It begins by identifying a number of the factors which make global supply chains so difficult to manage. It goes on to outline a framework of different approaches that can be taken to managing the supply chain with relation to child labour, moving from national and international regulation, through to the role of NGOs and the companies themselves. Focusing on an ‘engagement’ strategy for dealing with child (...)
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  13.  63
    Socrates, the primary question, and the unity of virtue.Justin C. Clark - 2015 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 45 (4):445-470.
    For Socrates, the virtues are a kind of knowledge, and the virtues form a unity. Sometimes, Socrates suggests that the virtues are all ‘one and the same’ thing. Other times, he suggests they are ‘parts of a single whole.’ I argue that the ‘what is x?’ question is sophisticated, it gives rise to two distinct kinds of investigations into virtue, a conceptual investigation into the ousia and a psychological investigation into the dunamis, Plato recognized the difference between definitional accounts of (...)
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  14.  52
    Philosophy, Neuroscience and Education.John Clark - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (1):36-46.
    This short note takes two quotations from Snooks’ recent editorial on neuroeducation and teases out some further details on the philosophy of neuroscience and neurophilosophy along with consideration of the implications of both for philosophy of education.
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  15.  23
    Approaches to child labour in the supply chain.Diana Winstanley, Joanna Clark & Helena Leeson - 2002 - Business Ethics: A European Review 11 (3):210-223.
    This paper examines the difficulties of dealing with child labour in the supply chain. It begins by identifying a number of the factors which make global supply chains so difficult to manage. It goes on to outline a framework of different approaches that can be taken to managing the supply chain with relation to child labour, moving from national and international regulation, through to the role of NGOs and the companies themselves. Focusing on an ‘engagement’ strategy for dealing with child (...)
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  16.  38
    Trust, risk perception, and intention to use autonomous vehicles: an interdisciplinary bibliometric review.Mohammad Naiseh, Jediah Clark, Tugra Akarsu, Yaniv Hanoch, Mario Brito, Mike Wald, Thomas Webster & Paurav Shukla - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-21.
    Autonomous vehicles (AV) offer promising benefits to society in terms of safety, environmental impact and increased mobility. However, acute challenges persist with any novel technology, inlcuding the perceived risks and trust underlying public acceptance. While research examining the current state of AV public perceptions and future challenges related to both societal and individual barriers to trust and risk perceptions is emerging, it is highly fragmented across disciplines. To address this research gap, by using the Web of Science database, our study (...)
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  17.  17
    Philosophical Dialogues: Arne Naess and the Progress of Philosophy.Peder Anker, Per Ariansen, Alfred J. Ayer, Murray Bookchin, Baird Callicott, John Clark, Bill Devall, Fons Elders, Paul Feyerabend, Warwick Fox, William C. French, Harold Glasser, Ramachandra Guha, Patsy Hallen, Stephan Harding, Andrew Mclaughlin, Ivar Mysterud, Arne Naess, Bryan Norton, Val Plumwood, Peter Reed, Kirkpatrick Sale, Ariel Salleh, Karen Warren, Richard A. Watson, Jon Wetlesen & Michael E. Zimmerman (eds.) - 1999 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The volume documents, and makes an original contribution to, an astonishing period in twentieth-century philosophy—the progress of Arne Naess's ecophilosophy from its inception to the present. It includes Naess's most crucial polemics with leading thinkers, drawn from sources as diverse as scholarly articles, correspondence, TV interviews and unpublished exchanges. The book testifies to the skeptical and self-correcting aspects of Naess's vision, which has deepened and broadened to include third world and feminist perspectives. Philosophical Dialogues is an essential addition to the (...)
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  18.  54
    Hubristic and Authentic Pride as Serial Homologues: The Same but Different.Jason A. Clark - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (4):397-398.
    Tracy, Shariff, and Cheng (2010) propose that human pride has two facets (hubristic pride [HP] and authentic pride [AP]) which, despite their similarities, diverge in important ways, including their evolutionary histories and functions. Put simplistically, AP emerged from HP. While AP and HP are thus homologous, HP continues to exist in humans, alongside AP. This is problematic on the most common interpretation of homology, in which an ancestral trait transforms into a derived trait, but does not remain present independently. I (...)
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  19. The Strength of Knowledge in Plato’s Protagoras.Justin Clark - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):237-255.
  20.  47
    Does Philosophy of Education Have a Future?John A. Clark - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (9):863-869.
    The apparently simple question, ‘Does philosophy of education have a future?’, is without a simple answer. Like so many other questions, it all depends on what we mean, and in this case, what we mean by the expression ‘philosophy of education’. I shall look at it in all of three ways: as a social institution, as an academic activity and as an intellectual pursuit. By doing so, it will become evident that consideration of each of them in turn will give (...)
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  21.  85
    The Role of Disgust in Norms, and of Norms in Disgust Research: Why Liberals Shouldn’t be Morally Disgusted by Moral Disgust.Jason A. Clark & Daniel M. T. Fessler - 2015 - Topoi 34 (2):483-498.
    Recently, many critics have argued that disgust is a morally harmful emotion, and that it should play no role in our moral and legal reasoning. Here we defend disgust as a morally beneficial moral capacity. We believe that a variety of liberal norms have been inappropriately imported into both moral psychology and ethical studies of disgust: disgust has been associated with conservative authors, values, value systems, and modes of moral reasoning that are seen as inferior to the values and moral (...)
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  22.  14
    The Metaphysical Foundations of Modern Science.Willis W. Harman & Jane Clark (eds.) - 1994 - Ions.
  23. .Jessica Homan Clark - 2014
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  24.  20
    Event boards as tools for holistic AI.Peter Gärdenfors, Mary-Anne Williams, Benjamin Johnston, Richard Billingsley, Jonathan Vitale, Pavlos Peppas & Jesse Clark - unknown
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  25.  73
    Eudaimonistic Virtue Ethics and Self-Effacement.Justin C. Clark - 2016 - Journal of Value Inquiry 50 (3):507-524.
  26.  64
    On taoism and politics.John P. Clark - 1983 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 10 (1):65-87.
  27.  24
    ‘Surprise Me!’ The (im)possibilities of agency and creativity within the standards framework of history education.Jennifer Clark & Adele Nye - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (6).
    In the current culture of regulation in higher education and, in turn, the history discipline, it is timely to problematize discipline standards in relation to student agency and creativity. This article argues that through the inclusion of a critical orientation and engaged pedagogy, historians have the opportunity to bring a more agentic dimension to the disciplinary conversation. Discipline standards privilege that arrogant historical moment in the higher education sector when certain skills development and knowledge creation becomes a hegemonic discourse. As (...)
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  28.  19
    History from the Ground Up: Bugs, Political Economy, and God in Kirby and Spence’s Introduction to Entomology.J. Clark - 2006 - Isis 97:28-55.
    William Kirby and William Spence’s Introduction to Entomology is generally recognized as one of the founding texts of entomological science in English. This essay examines the ideological allegiances of the coauthors of the Introduction. In particular, it analyzes the ideological implications of their divergent opinions on animal instinct. Different vocational pursuits shaped each man’s natural history. Spence, a political economist, pursued fact‐based science that was shorn of references to religion. Kirby, a Tory High Churchman, placed revelation at the very heart (...)
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  29.  14
    History from the Ground Up.J. F. M. Clark - 2006 - Isis 97 (1):28-55.
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  30.  49
    Integrating basic and higher-cognitive emotions within a common evolutionary framework: Lessons from the transformation of primate dominance into human pride.Jason Clark - 2013 - Philosophical Psychology 26 (3):437-460.
    Many argue that higher-cognitive emotions such as pride arose de novo in humans, and thus fall outside of the scope of the kinds of evolutionary explanations offered for ?basic emotions,? like fear. This approach fractures the general category of ?emotion? into two deeply distinct kinds of emotion. However, an increasing number of emotion researchers are converging on the conclusion that higher-cognitive emotions are evolutionarily rooted in simpler emotional responses found in primates. I argue that pride fits this pattern, and then (...)
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  31.  14
    Ethical argument for establishing good manufacturing practice for phage therapy in the UK.Mehrunisha Suleman, Jason R. Clark, Susan Bull & Joshua D. Jones - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) poses an increasing threat to patient care and population health and there is a growing need for novel therapies to tackle AMR. Bacteriophage (phage) therapy is a re-emerging antimicrobial strategy with the potential to transform how bacterial infections are treated in patients and populations. Currently, in the UK, phages can be used as unlicensed medicinal products on a ‘named-patient’ basis. We make an ethical case for why it is crucially important for the UK to invest in Good (...)
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  32.  23
    Scaling-up regional fruit and vegetable distribution: potential for adaptive change in the food system.Jill K. Clark & Shoshanah M. Inwood - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (3):503-519.
    As demand for locally grown food increases there have been calls to ‘scale-up’ local food production to regionally distribute food and to sell into more mainstream grocery and retail venues where consumers are already shopping. Growing research and practice focusing on how to improve, expand and conceptualize regional distribution systems includes strategies such as value chain development using the Agriculture of the Middle framework. When the Ohio Food Policy Advisory Council asked how they could scale-up the distribution of Ohio fresh (...)
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  33.  16
    ‘the Ants Were Duly Visited’: making sense of John Lubbock, scientific naturalism and the senses of social insects.J. F. M. Clark - 1997 - British Journal for the History of Science 30 (2):151-176.
    Much ink has been spilt in consideration of the once pervasive reliance on military metaphors to depict the relationships between science and religion in the nineteenth century. This has resulted in historically sensitive treatments of secularization; and the realization that the relationship between science and religion was not a bloody war between intellectual nation states, but a protracted divorce of former partners. Moreover, historians of science have been encouraged to throw off the yoke of the internalism–externalism debate, and to explore (...)
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  34.  22
    Comment: From the Armchair to the Toilet: McGinn’s Evolutionary Tale of Disgust.Jason A. Clark - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (3):217-218.
    Strohminger criticizes McGinn for his lack of attention to recent scientific findings, and for ignoring common sense. This commentary deepens both of these criticisms via an exploration of McGinn’s account of the evolution of disgust.
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  35.  6
    Pierre Gassendi and the Physics of Galileo.Joseph Clark - 1963 - Isis 54:352-370.
  36. Social ecology: A philosophy of dialectical naturalism.John Clark - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy.
  37.  96
    A social ecology.John P. Clark - unknown
    community reflecting on itself, uncovering its history, exploring its present predicament, and contemplating its future. [2] One aspect of this awakening is a process of philosophical reflection. As a philosophical approach, a social ecology investigates the ontological, epistemological, ethical and political dimensions of the relationship between the social and the ecological, and seeks the practical wisdom that results from such reflection. It seeks to give us, as beings situated in the course of real human and natural history, guidance in facing (...)
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  38.  15
    Philosophy and Geography I: Space, Place, and Environmental Ethics.Andrew Light, Jonathan M. Smith, Annie L. Booth, Robert Burch, John Clark, Anthony M. Clayton, Matthew Gandy, Eric Katz, Roger King, Roger Paden, Clive L. Spash, Eliza Steelwater, Zev Trachtenberg & James L. Wescoat (eds.) - 1996 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The inaugural collection in an exciting new exchange between philosophers and geographers, this volume provides interdisciplinary approaches to the environment as space, place, and idea. Never before have philosophers and geographers approached each other's subjects in such a strong spirit of mutual understanding. The result is a concrete exploration of the human-nature relationship that embraces strong normative approaches to environmental problems.
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  39.  8
    Navigating parental requests: considering the relational potential standard in paediatric end-of-life care in the paediatric intensive care unit.Jenny Kingsley, Jonna Clark, Mithya Lewis-Newby, Denise Marie Dudzinski & Douglas Diekema - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Families and clinicians approaching a child’s death in the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) frequently encounter questions surrounding medical decision-making at the end of life (EOL), including defining what is in the child’s best interest, finding an optimal balance of benefit over harm, and sometimes addressing potential futility and moral distress. The best interest standard (BIS) is often marshalled by clinicians to help navigate these dilemmas and focuses on a clinician’s primary ethical duty to the paediatric patient. This approach does (...)
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  40.  26
    Philosophy of Education in Today’s World and Tomorrow’s: A View from ‘Down Under’.John Clark - 2006 - Paideusis: Journal of the Canadian Philosophy of Education Society 15 (1):21-30.
    In considering philosophy of education now and in the future, this paper explores the issue from an Australasian perspective. While philosophy of education in this part of the world has strong international links there is an absence of indigenous influences. A number of philosophical strands have developed including naturalism and postmodernism which have informed thinking about education policy and practice. The institutional side of philosophy of education has witnessed both the promotion of philosophers to professorial positions and the slow decline (...)
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  41.  58
    Socratic inquiry and the “What‐is‐F?” question.Justin C. Clark - 2018 - European Journal of Philosophy 26 (4):1324-1342.
    In raising the “What-is-F?” question, commentators disagree about whether Socrates is asking a conceptual question or a causal question. I argue that the contexts surrounding Socrates' two most prominent examples of adequate answers confirm that the “What-is-F?” question is a conceptual question in both the Meno and Euthyphro, but a causal question in the Laches and Protagoras. The “What-is-F?” question is multifunctional. Plato's Socrates consistently employs two separate vocabularies in connection with these two types of questions. By outlining their vocabularies, (...)
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  42.  22
    Parental Refusals of Blood Transfusions from COVID-19 Vaccinated Donors for Children Needing Cardiac Surgery.Daniel H. Kim, Emily Berkman, Jonna D. Clark, Nabiha H. Saifee, Douglas S. Diekema & Mithya Lewis-Newby - forthcoming - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics.
    There is a growing trend of refusal of blood transfusions from COVID-19 vaccinated donors. We highlight three cases where parents have refused blood transfusions from COVID-19 vaccinated donors on behalf of their children in the setting of congenital cardiac surgery. These families have also requested accommodations such as explicit identification of blood from COVID-19 vaccinated donors, directed donation from a COVID19 unvaccinated family member, or use of a non-standard blood supplier. We address the ethical challenges posed by these issues. We (...)
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  43.  39
    Explaining learning: From analysis to paralysis to hippocampus.John Clark - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (5):667–687.
    This paper seeks to explain learning by examining five theories of learning—conceptual analysis, behavioural, constructivist, computational and connectionist. The first two are found wanting and rejected. Piaget's constructivist theory offers a general explanatory framework but fails to provide an adequate account of the empirical mechanisms of learning. Two theories from cognitive science offering rival explanations of learning are finally considered; it is argued that the brain is not like a computer so the computational model is rejected in favour of a (...)
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  44. Marx’s Inorganic Body.John P. Clark - 1989 - Environmental Ethics 11 (3):243-258.
    Attempts to find an authentically ecological outlook in Marx’s philosophy of nature are ultimately unsuccessful. Although Marx does at times point the way toward a truly ecological dialectic, he does not himself follow that way. Instead, he proposes a problematic of technological liberation and mastery of nature that preserves many of the dualisms of that tradition of domination with which he ostensibly wishes to break.
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  45.  29
    Winch on learning.John Clark - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (1):58-67.
    Those in education committed to folk psychology reject the advances of neuroscience as the way to explain learning. Winch is one of the most determined defenders of folk psychology. Yet his account of folk psychology is weak and his rejection of neuroscience is deeply flawed. This article sets out Winch’s Wittgensteinian theory of learning then proceeds to critically examine a number of issues, including the folk psychology/cognitive science dualism, problems with folk psychology, the advantages of cognitive science and why folk (...)
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  46. Examining the Hayek-Friedman hypothesis on economic and political freedom.R. A. Lawson & J. R. Clark - 2010 - Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization 74:230–239.
  47.  28
    “Lockeian liberalism” and “classical republicanism”: the formation, function and failure of the categories.J. C. D. Clark - 2023 - Intellectual History Review 33 (1):11-31.
    The contest between “Lockeian liberalism” and “classical republicanism” as explanatory frameworks for the intellectual history of the American Revolution, and therefore of the present-day United States, has been one of the longest running and most distinguished in recent U.S. historiography. It also has major implications for the history of political thought in the North Atlantic Anglophone world more widely. Yet this debate was merely suspended when it was held to have ended in an ill-defined compromise. Although some U.S. historians expressed (...)
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  48.  36
    Probabilistic Motor Sequence Yields Greater Offline and Less Online Learning than Fixed Sequence.Yue Du, Shikha Prashad, Ilana Schoenbrun & Jane E. Clark - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  49.  12
    Killing the Enviropigs.Jonathan L. Clark - 2015 - Journal of Animal Ethics 5 (1):20-30,.
    In spring 2012, after losing the main source of funding for its Enviropig project, the University of Guelph killed its last remaining Enviropigs. Or, as a university spokesperson put it, the pigs were "humanely euthanized." Through an engagement with this particular case, I examine the ethical implications of using the term euthanasia to describe the killing of perfectly healthy animals who were bred for research but are no longer needed for this purpose. Given the ethical shortcut that terms like euthanasia (...)
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  50.  73
    Social justice, education and schooling: Some philosophical issues.John A. Clark - 2006 - British Journal of Educational Studies 54 (3):272-287.
    Social justice is a key concept in current education policy and practice. It is, however, a problematic one in its application to schooling. This paper begins with a critique of the account of social justice offered by Gewirtz followed by an alternative philosophical notion based on the perfect world argument and the just society where equality is to the fore. This leads on to an exploration of what it is to be an educated citizen, consideration of the just school and (...)
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