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  1.  2
    Constitutionalism at the Nexus of Life and Law.Krishanu Saha, Sheila Jasanoff & J. Benjamin Hurlbut - 2020 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 45 (6):979-1000.
    This essay introduces a collection of articles gathered under the theme of “law, science, and constitutions of life.” Together, they explore how revolutions in notions of what biological life is are eliciting correspondingly revolutionary imaginations of how life should be governed. The central theoretical contribution of the collection is to further elaborate the concept of bioconstitutionalism, which draws attention to especially consequential forms of coproduction at the law–life nexus. This introduction offers a theoretical discussion of bioconstitutionalism. It explores the constitutional (...)
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  2.  44
    Limits of Responsibility: Genome Editing, Asilomar, and the Politics of Deliberation.J. Benjamin Hurlbut - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (5):11-14.
    On April 3, 2015, a group of prominent biologists and ethicists called for a worldwide moratorium on human genetic engineering in which the genetic modifications would be passed on to future generations. Describing themselves as “interested stakeholders,” the group held a retreat in Napa, California, in January to “initiate an informed discussion” of CRISPR/Cas9 genome engineering technology, which could enable high-precision insertion, deletion, and recoding of genes in human eggs, sperm, and embryos. The group declared that the advent of a (...)
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  3.  2
    Bioconstitutional Imaginaries and the Comparative Politics of Genetic Self-Knowledge.Sheila Jasanoff, Luca Marelli, Ingrid Metzler & J. Benjamin Hurlbut - 2020 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 45 (6):1087-1118.
    Genetic testing has become a vehicle through which basic constitutional relationships between citizens and the state are revisited, reaffirmed, or rearticulated. The interplay between the is of genetic knowledge and the ought of government unfolds in the context of diverse imaginaries of the forms of human well-being, freedom, and flourishing that states have a duty to support. This article examines how the United Kingdom, Germany, and the United States governed testing for Alzheimer’s disease, and how they diverged in defining potential (...)
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  4.  7
    Imperatives of Governance: Human Genome Editing and the Problem of Progress.J. Benjamin Hurlbut - forthcoming - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine.
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  5.  9
    Imperatives of Governance: Human Genome Editing and the Problem of Progress.J. Benjamin Hurlbut - 2020 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 63 (1):177-194.
    The ability to make direct genetic changes to the DNA of future children poses profound challenges for governance: should it be done? For what purposes and subject to what limitations? And, no less importantly, who should decide? As a resolution pending in the US Senate rightly states, the prospect of editing the germline "touches on all of humanity". Given this, how should we as a human community guide and govern this emerging technology?The question of how human genome editing should be (...)
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  6.  1
    A Science That Knows No Country: Pandemic Preparedness, Global Risk, Sovereign Science.J. Benjamin Hurlbut - 2017 - Big Data and Society 4 (2).
    This paper examines political norms and relationships associated with governance of pandemic risk. Through a pair of linked controversies over scientific access to H5N1 flu virus and genomic data, it examining the duties, obligations, and allocations of authority articulated around the imperative for globally free-flowing information and around the corollary imperative for a science that is set free to produce such information. It argues that scientific regimes are laying claim to a kind of sovereignty, particularly in moments where scientific experts (...)
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  7.  7
    The Experts Are Not Enough.J. Benjamin Hurlbut - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (3):43-44.
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  8.  1
    Promising Waste: Biobanking, Embryo Research, and Infrastructures of Ethical Efficiency.J. Benjamin Hurlbut - 2015 - Monash Bioethics Review 33 (4):301-324.
    Biobanks are custodial institutions that enhance the utility and value of biological materials by collecting and curating them. Their custodial functions tend to include ethical oversight and governance. This paper explores how biobanks increase the value of biological materials by standardizing routines of governance in order to engender “ethical efficiency.” Focusing in particular upon banking of human embryos for research, the article offers an historical account of how human embryos came to be “waste” available for use by researchers in the (...)
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