Results for 'Introfduction by R. F. Mcrae'

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  1. A system of logic ratiocinative and inductive. Books I-III.John Stuart Mill, J. M. Robson Editor of the Text & Introfduction by R. F. Mcrae - 1965 - In The Collected Works of John Stuart Mill. Liberty Fund.
     
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  2. A system of logic ratiocinative and inductive. Books IV-vi and appendices.John Stuart Mill, J. M. Robson Editor of the Text & Introfduction by R. F. Mcrae - 1965 - In The Collected Works of John Stuart Mill. Liberty Fund.
     
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  3.  18
    On Being Present to the Mind: A Reply.R. F. McRae - 1975 - Dialogue 14 (4):664-666.
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  4.  33
    Le Mathématisme de Descartes. Par Jean-Louis Allard. Éditions de l'Université d'Ottawa, Ottawa, 1963. 225 pages $6.00. [REVIEW]R. F. McRae - 1964 - Dialogue 3 (1):92-93.
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  5.  31
    Redefining nature: ecology, culture, and domestication.R. F. Ellen & Katsuyoshi Fukui (eds.) - 1996 - Washington, D.C.: Berg.
    - How can anthropology improve our understanding of the interrelationship between nature and culture? - What can anthropology contribute to practical debates which depend on particular definitions of nature, such as that concerning sustainable development? Humankind has evolved over several million years by living in and utilizing 'nature' and by assimilating it into 'culture'. Indeed, the technological and cultural advancement of the species has been widely acknowledged to rest upon human domination and control of nature. Yet, by the 1960s, the (...)
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  6.  42
    The shuffle Hopf algebra and noncommutative full completeness.R. F. Blute & P. J. Scott - 1998 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 63 (4):1413-1436.
    We present a full completeness theorem for the multiplicative fragment of a variant of noncommutative linear logic, Yetter's cyclic linear logic (CyLL). The semantics is obtained by interpreting proofs as dinatural transformations on a category of topological vector spaces, these transformations being equivariant under certain actions of a noncocommutative Hopf algebra called the shuffie algebra. Multiplicative sequents are assigned a vector space of such dinaturals, and we show that this space has as a basis the denotations of cut-free proofs in (...)
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  7. The Shuffle Hopf Algebra and Noncommutative Full Completeness.R. F. Blute & P. J. Scott - 1998 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 63 (4):1413-1436.
    We present a full completeness theorem for the multiplicative fragment of a variant of noncommutative linear logic, Yetter's cyclic linear logic. The semantics is obtained by interpreting proofs as dinatural transformations on a category of topological vector spaces, these transformations being equivariant under certain actions of a noncocommutative Hopf algebra called the shuffie algebra. Multiplicative sequents are assigned a vector space of such dinaturals, and we show that this space has as a basis the denotations of cut-free proofs in CyLL (...)
     
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  8.  20
    Linear Läuchli semantics.R. F. Blute & P. J. Scott - 1996 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 77 (2):101-142.
    We introduce a linear analogue of Läuchli's semantics for intuitionistic logic. In fact, our result is a strengthening of Läuchli's work to the level of proofs, rather than provability. This is obtained by considering continuous actions of the additive group of integers on a category of topological vector spaces. The semantics, based on functorial polymorphism, consists of dinatural transformations which are equivariant with respect to all such actions. Such dinatural transformations are called uniform. To any sequent in Multiplicative Linear Logic (...)
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  9.  47
    Historical Materialism.R. F. Atkinson - 1982 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lecture Series 14:57-69.
    Historical materialism I take to be the view expressed in the well-known Preface to the Critique of Political Economy (1859) and exemplified in Capital and in many other writings by Marx and by Marxists. I shall begin with a few introductory remarks, next sketch in the theory, and finally contend that, despite real attractions, it too far limits the scope of legitimate historical enquiry to be ultimately acceptable.
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  10. The Control of Parenthood. By various writers, edited by James Marchant, by F. B.R. F. Alfred Hoernle - 1920 - International Journal of Ethics 31:443.
     
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  11. Language and Reason: A Study of Habermas's Pragmatics. By Maeve Cooke.R. F. Goodman - 1998 - The European Legacy 3:147-147.
     
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  12. Plato's doctrine of freedom.R. F. Stalley - 1998 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 98 (2):145–158.
    The idea of freedom plays a key role in Plato's moral and political thought. In the Republic justice is shown to be beneficial because the just man alone is truly free. There are parallels here with modern discussions of freedom. The Laws argues that to be free a city must avoid the extremes of liberty and of authoritarianism. The legislator should rely on persuasion, not force, so that people willingly obey his laws. The underlying idea is that we are free (...)
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  13.  5
    Synchronicity: An Acausal Connecting Principle. (From Vol. 8. Of the Collected Works of C. G. Jung).R. F. C. Hull (ed.) - 2010 - Princeton University Press.
    Jung was intrigued from early in his career with coincidences, especially those surprising juxtapositions that scientific rationality could not adequately explain. He discussed these ideas with Albert Einstein before World War I, but first used the term "synchronicity" in a 1930 lecture, in reference to the unusual psychological insights generated from consulting the I Ching. A long correspondence and friendship with the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Wolfgang Pauli stimulated a final, mature statement of Jung's thinking on synchronicity, originally published in 1952 (...)
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  14. The Letters of William James. Edited by his son, Henry James, by M. Jourdain.R. F. Alfred Hoernle - 1920 - International Journal of Ethics 31:445.
     
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  15.  32
    Natural selection and neoteny.R. F. Ewer - 1960 - Acta Biotheoretica 13 (4):161-184.
    Even today, a century after the publication of the “Origin of Species”, current zoological literature often reveals an insufficient grasp of the implications of the now generally accepted view that it is natural selection that confers direction on the evolutionary process.This is, in part, due to a reaction against oversimplified teleology and against Lamarckism. In rejecting Lamarck's thesis that the activities of an animal directly affect its hereditary characters it is frequently assumed that this implies that such activities are irrelevant (...)
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  16. The problem of counterfactuals.R. F. Tredwell - 1965 - Philosophy of Science 32 (3/4):310-323.
    The "problem of counterfactuals," as proposed by Goodman and Chisholm, cannot be solved. However, a similar program, pioneered by Hiż and Mrs. Milmed, but largely neglected, can be completed and promises a satisfactory analysis of subjunctive conditionals.
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  17.  14
    An Analysis of Morals. By John Hartland-Swann. (George Allen & Unwin Ltd. 1960. Pp. 208. Price 25s.).R. F. Atkinson - 1961 - Philosophy 36 (136):82-.
  18.  27
    Facts and Obligations. By Dorothy Emmet. (Published by Dr. Williams' Trust, London, 1958. Pp. 20. Price 3s. 6d.).R. F. Atkinson - 1959 - Philosophy 34 (130):275-.
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  19.  16
    Human Freedom and Responsibility. By Frederick Vivian. (Chatto & Windus Ltd., London, 1964. Pp. 181. Price 21s.).R. F. Atkinson - 1966 - Philosophy 41 (155):90-.
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  20.  21
    Philosophical Essays. By O. K. Bouwsma. (University of Nebraska Press, 1965. Pp. 209. Price $5.00.).R. F. Holland - 1966 - Philosophy 41 (156):186-.
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  21.  49
    The Moral Point of View. By Kurt Baier. (Cornell U.P. and O.U.P. London, 1958. Pp. xii + 326. Price 32s.).R. F. Atkinson - 1960 - Philosophy 35 (132):69-.
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  22. "Louis Pasteur, Free Lance of Science." By Rene J. Dubos.R. F. J. Withers - 1951 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 ([5/8]):265.
  23.  41
    Would Plato Have Approved of the National-Socialist State?R. F. Alfred Hoernlé - 1938 - Philosophy 13 (50):166 - 182.
    Like all my generation at Oxford, in the far-away years of the turn of the century, I received my first introduction to the Philosophical Theory of the State through the reading of Plato’s Republic. There followed Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Hegel, Bosanquet— with a disapproving glance at Mill and Spencer. Alongside this survey of widely varying theories there ran a lively interest in the politics of the day under a “democratic,” i.e. parliamentary, system of government, with much experience of “democratic” (...)
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  24.  29
    Philosophers Discuss Education.R. F. Holland - 1977 - Philosophy 52 (199):63 - 81.
    It has come to be expected that collections issued by the Royal Institute of Philosophy will contain work that has quality or is otherwise interesting. This volume runs true to form and presents plenty of both. It gives the proceedings of the conference arranged by the Institute at Exeter in 1973, consisting of five symposia together with Chairman's remarks of about eight pages or so for each symposium, and in three cases postscripts by the first speaker. The contributors and topics (...)
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  25.  40
    Plato's Laws: A Critical Guide. Edited by Christopher Bobonich. (Cambridge UP, 2010. Pp. vii + 245. Price £50.00).R. F. Stalley - 2012 - Philosophical Quarterly 62 (247):399-400.
  26.  33
    Fanciful fates.R. F. Holland - 1997 - Philosophical Investigations 20 (3):246–256.
    Fanciful fates is a discussion of ideas put forward by D.Z. Phillips in his book Wittgenstein and Religion, Ch. 13 –‘Authorship and Authenticity: Kierkegaard and Wittgenstein’. I begin by opposing the contention that Kierkegaard attacked Socrates (and that Josiah Thompson, one of Kierkegaard’s biographers, attacked Kierkegaard) because of a worry connected with the ‘the demise of foundationalism’. I then deal with Phillips's claim that a similarly motivated attack on Wittgenstein has been undertaken by me. I show that Phillips’s account of (...)
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  27.  19
    On Making Sense of a Philosophical Fragment.R. F. Holland - 1956 - Classical Quarterly 6 (3-4):215-.
    A Fragment of ancient philosophy is like a code message which it is the task of the scholar to decipher. The cryptogram has come down to us, but not the key. In case this beginning should be thought obvious by anyone, let me say at once that I do not believe a word of it, though I believe that the attitude it epitomizes is by no means uncommon and is part of the explanation of a tendency to mishandle philosophical fragments. (...)
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  28.  12
    On Making Sense of a Philosophical Fragment.R. F. Holland - 1956 - Classical Quarterly 6 (3-4):215-220.
    A Fragment of ancient philosophy is like a code message which it is the task of the scholar to decipher. The cryptogram has come down to us, but not the key. In case this beginning should be thought obvious by anyone, let me say at once that I do not believe a word of it, though I believe that the attitude it epitomizes is by no means uncommon and is part of the explanation of a tendency to mishandle philosophical fragments. (...)
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  29.  6
    Answer to Job: (From Vol. 11 of the Collected Works of C. G. Jung).R. F. C. Hull (ed.) - 2010 - Princeton University Press.
    Considered one of Jung's most controversial works, Answer to Job also stands as Jung's most extensive commentary on a biblical text. Here, he confronts the story of the man who challenged God, the man who experienced hell on earth and still did not reject his faith. Job's journey parallels Jung's own experience--as reported in The Red Book: Liber Novus--of descending into the depths of his own unconscious, confronting and reconciling the rejected aspects of his soul. This paperback edition of Jung's (...)
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  30.  12
    Dreams: (From Volumes 4, 8, 12, and 16 of the Collected Works of C. G. Jung).R. F. C. Hull (ed.) - 2010 - Princeton University Press.
    Dream analysis is a distinctive and foundational part of analytical psychology, the school of psychology founded by C. G. Jung and his successors. This volume collects Jung's most insightful contributions to the study of dreams and their meaning. The essays in this volume, written by Jung between 1909 and 1945, reveal Jung's most essential views about dreaming--especially regarding the relationship between language and dream. Through these studies, Jung grew to understand that dreams are themselves a language, a language through which (...)
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  31.  8
    Four Archetypes: (From Vol. 9, Part 1 of the Collected Works of C. G. Jung) [New in Paper].R. F. C. Hull (ed.) - 2010 - Princeton University Press.
    One of Jung's most influential ideas has been his view, presented here, that primordial images, or archetypes, dwell deep within the unconscious of every human being. The essays in this volume gather together Jung's most important statements on the archetypes, beginning with the introduction of the concept in "Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious." In separate essays, he elaborates and explores the archetypes of the Mother and the Trickster, considers the psychological meaning of the myths of Rebirth, and contrasts the idea (...)
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  32.  7
    Jung Contra Freud: The 1912 New York Lectures on the Theory of Psychoanalysis.R. F. C. Hull (ed.) - 2011 - Princeton University Press.
    In the autumn of 1912, C. G. Jung, then president of the International Psychoanalytic Association, set out his critique and reformulation of the theory of psychoanalysis in a series of lectures in New York, ideas that were to prove unacceptable to Freud, thus creating a schism in the Freudian school. Jung challenged Freud's understandings of sexuality, the origins of neuroses, dream interpretation, and the unconscious, and Jung also became the first to argue that every analyst should themselves be analyzed. Seen (...)
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  33.  80
    The Will in Hume's Treatise.R. F. Stalley - 1986 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 24 (1):41-53.
    Hume regards the will as an impression which normally is followed by an appropriate bodily movement. It is unclear why he adopts this theory instead of saying that passions are directly followed by actions (a view which would in some respects suit him better). I suggest that he needs impressions of the will to explain our knowledge of our own acts. They thus play an indispensible role in hume's newtonian science of the mind.
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  34. The Cambridge Companion to Plato’s R Epublic.G. R. F. Ferrari (ed.) - 2007 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This Companion provides a fresh and comprehensive account of this outstanding work, which remains among the most frequently read works of Greek philosophy, indeed of Classical antiquity in general. The sixteen essays, by authors who represent various academic disciplines, bring a spectrum of interpretive approaches to bear in order to aid the understanding of a wide-ranging audience, from first-time readers of the Republic who require guidance, to more experienced readers who wish to explore contemporary currents in the work’s interpretation. The (...)
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  35.  8
    Notes by the way.R. F. Alfred Hoernle - 1924 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 2 (2):95.
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  36.  3
    Notes by the way.R. F. Alfred Hoernle - 1924 - Australasian Journal of Psychology and Philosophy 2 (2):95-95.
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  37.  8
    An Outline of Genetic Psychology According to the Theory of Inherited Mind.R. F. Rattray - 1931 - Philosophy 6 (23):347-364.
    One of the great difficulties in effecting a synthesis of experience is the contradiction of the apparently mechanical character of the physical universe on the one hand, and the sense of freedom we associate with life on the other. In our own persons, we are told by medical science, or some of it, we are governed by physiological laws which are mechanical, as distinct from vital, in their nature. The best reconciliation of these with freedom, in the writer's opinion, is (...)
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  38.  26
    On Some Attempted Criticism.R. F. Holland - 1973 - Philosophy 48 (185):293 - 295.
    Christopher Cherry's article in the January 1973 issue of this journal has on its first page the sentence ‘And when a philosopher writes that “no clear idea is available to us of what moral scepticism amounts to”, that moral scepticism would, if it were possible at all, have to be a “specially cooked-up affair” by contrast with other varieties of scepticism, it is hard not to accuse him of just such a vice.’ He means the vice of disingenuousness and the (...)
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  39.  9
    An Outline of Genetic Psychology: According to the Theory of Inherited Mind.R. F. Rattray - 1931 - Philosophy 6 (23):347 - 364.
    One of the great difficulties in effecting a synthesis of experience is the contradiction of the apparently mechanical character of the physical universe on the one hand, and the sense of freedom we associate with life on the other. In our own persons, we are told by medical science, or some of it, we are governed by physiological laws which are mechanical, as distinct from vital, in their nature. The best reconciliation of these with freedom, in the writer's opinion, is (...)
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  40.  36
    Phillips on Waiters and Bad Faith.R. F. Khan - 1984 - Philosophy 59:389.
    Professor D. Z. Phillips in ‘Bad Faith and Sartre's Waiter’ assigns to Sartre the view that ‘waiters are necessarily in bad faith’, i.e. the profession of waiting as such is in bad faith. What could this mean in the context of Sartre's philosophy? That waiters as a class seek to flee their freedom by adopting that vocation? It must mean something on those lines since, for Sartre, to engage in bad faith is to deny one's freedom. The question then arises: (...)
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  41.  93
    Listening to the Cicadas: A Study of Plato's Phaedrus.G. R. F. Ferrari - 1987 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This full-length study of Plato's dialogue Phaedrus, now in paperback, is written in the belief that such concerted scrutiny of a single dialogue is an important part of the project of understanding Plato so far as possible 'from the inside' - of gaining a feel for the man's philosophy. The focus of this account is on how the resources both of persuasive myth and of formal argument, for all that Plato sets them in strong contrast, nevertheless complement and reinforce each (...)
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  42.  35
    Animals versus the Laws of Inertia.R. F. Hassing - 1992 - Review of Metaphysics 46 (1):29 - 61.
    THIS PAPER INVESTIGATES THE LAWS OF MOTION in Newton and Descartes, focusing initially on the first laws of each. Newton's first law and Descartes' first law were later conjoined in the minds of philosophic interpreters in what thereafter came to be called the law of inertia. Our analysis of this law will lead to the special significance of Newton's third law, and thus to a consideration of the philosophical implications of Newton's three laws of motion taken as a whole. This (...)
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  43.  54
    Absolute Ethics, Mathematics and the Impossibility of Politics.R. F. Holland - 1977 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 11:172-188.
    The idea of absolute goodness and the idea of an absolute requitement tend nowadays to be viewed with suspicion in the world of English-speaking philosophy. The tendency is well rooted and has not just arisen by osmosis from the temper of the times. There are various lines of thought, all of them attractive, by which a recent or contemporary academic practitioner of the subject could have been induced into scepticism about an ethics of absolute conceptions.
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  44.  20
    Absolute Ethics, Mathematics and the Impossibility of Politics.R. F. Holland - 1977 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 11:172-188.
    The idea of absolute goodness and the idea of an absolute requitement tend nowadays to be viewed with suspicion in the world of English-speaking philosophy. The tendency is well rooted and has not just arisen by osmosis from the temper of the times. There are various lines of thought, all of them attractive, by which a recent or contemporary academic practitioner of the subject could have been induced into scepticism about an ethics of absolute conceptions.
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  45.  24
    Quantum mechanics without wave functions.Lipo Wang & R. F. O'Connell - 1988 - Foundations of Physics 18 (10):1023-1033.
    The phase space formulation of quantum mechanics is based on the use of quasidistribution functions. This technique was pioneered by Wigner, whose distribution function is perhaps the most commonly used of the large variety that we find discussed in the literature. Here we address the question of how one can obtain distribution functions and hence do quantum mechanics without the use of wave functions.
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  46. The Ethical Patiency of Cultural Heritage.R. F. J. Seddon - 2011 - Dissertation, Durham University
    Current treatments of cultural heritage as an object of moral concern (whether it be the heritage of mankind or of some particular group of people) have tended to treat it as a means to ensure human wellbeing: either as ‘cultural property’ or ‘cultural patrimony’, suggesting concomitant rights of possession and exclusion, or otherwise as something which, gaining its ethical significance from the roles it plays in people’s lives and the formation of their identities, is the beneficiary at most of indirect (...)
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  47.  17
    Plato Laws, edited by Malcolm Schofield, and translated by Tom Griffith.R. F. Stalley - 2018 - Polis 35 (2):598-602.
  48.  51
    Historical Materialism.R. F. Atkinson - 1982 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 14:57-69.
    Historical materialism I take to be the view expressed in the well-known Preface to the Critique of Political Economy and exemplified in Capital and in many other writings by Marx and by Marxists. I shall begin with a few introductory remarks, next sketch in the theory, and finally contend that, despite real attractions, it too far limits the scope of legitimate historical enquiry to be ultimately acceptable.
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  49.  19
    “Ought” and “Is”1: PHILOSOPHY.R. F. Atkinson - 1958 - Philosophy 33 (124):29-49.
    There is probably no student of modern philosophy, and certainly no listener to the Third Programme, who has never received the warning that he must on no account deduce an “ought” from an “is.” This prohibition, it is claimed, is securely based in established and unchallengeable principles of logic. Professor Flew was speaking for many others when he said, in the course of a broadcast entitled “Problems of Perspectives”, “I think it is very important indeed to make as clear as (...)
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  50. City and soul in Plato's Republic.G. R. F. Ferrari - 2003 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    Tracing a central theme of Plato's Republic , G. R. F. Ferrari reconsiders in this study the nature and purpose of the comparison between the structure of society and that of the individual soul. In four chapters, Ferrari examines the personalities and social status of the brothers Glaucon and Adeimantus, Plato's notion of justice, coherence in Plato's description of the decline of states, and the tyrant and the philosopher king—a pair who, in their different ways, break with the terms of (...)
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