Results for 'Imaginary letters'

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  1. Valuing Tradition, Valuing History: Reading Thomas McGrath’s Letter to an Imaginary Friend.Donald Smith - 1993 - Nature, Society, and Thought 6 (3):299-310.
     
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  2.  16
    Philosophical Letters: Letters Concerning the English Nation. Voltaire & Ernest Dilworth - 2003 - Courier Dover Publications.
    First published in English in 1733, Philosophical Letters was condemned by the French government as "likely to inspire a license of thought most dangerous to religion and civil order." It remains a landmark.
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  3.  31
    Hansen (M.H.) (Ed.) The Imaginary Polis. Symposium, January 7–10 2004. Acts of the Copenhagen Polis Centre Vol. 7. (Historisk-Filosofiske Meddelelser 91.) Pp. 444. Copenhagen: The Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters, 2005. Cased, €40.27. ISBN: 978-87-7304-310-. [REVIEW]Lynette Mitchell - 2008 - The Classical Review 58 (1):184-186.
  4.  18
    Philosophical Letters: Letters Concerining the English Nation. Voltaire & Ernest Dilworth - 2003 - Courier Dover Publications.
    They also include essays on Locke, Descartes, and Newton. Voltaire was much influenced by English tolerance, and his observations on the subject sounded a revolutionary note among European readers that resonated for long afterward.
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  5.  5
    Thinking About Contradictions: The Imaginary Logic of Nikolai Aleksandrovich Vasil’Ev.Venanzio Raspa - 2017 - Cham, Switzerland: Springer Verlag.
    This volume examines the entire logical and philosophical production of Nikolai A. Vasil’ev, studying his life and activities as a historian and man of letters. Readers will gain a comprehensive understanding of this influential Russian logician, philosopher, psychologist, and poet. The author frames Vasil’ev’s work within its historical and cultural context. He takes into consideration both the situation of logic in Russia and the state of logic in Western Europe, from the end of the 19th century to the beginning (...)
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  6.  12
    On Thinking: Open Letter to Hannah Arendt.Agnes Heller, David Roberts & Peter Beilharz - 2020 - Thesis Eleven 159 (1):23-34.
    Thesis Eleven is honoured to be able to publish this text by our late friend and mentor Agnes Heller. It was secured in the period before her recent death, and is published now posthumously in her memory. Echoing her earlier text written as an Imaginary Preface to Arendt’s Totalitarianism, it responds to themes in the later text, The Life of the Mind. These were among the most eminent of the minds referred to later as Women in Dark Times. Their (...)
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  7.  1
    Dear God: Children's Letters to God.David Heller (ed.) - 1987 - Doubleday.
    Collected in the course of research on the religious development of the young, these letters were written by children ranging in age from six to twelve and from a variety of religious backgrounds.
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  8.  6
    Amongst Letters I Am the Vowel A.Namita Goswami - 2019 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 9 (2):20-44.
    This essay conducts a comparative reading of Gayatri Spivak’s discussion of the Hindu epic Mahabharata and Mahasweta Devi’s story “Draupadi.” While scholars have examined Devi’s tribal protagonist Draupadi in conjunction with the high Hindu goddess Draupadi of the epic, I suggest that the former’s viswarupadarshana should be read in contrast to the role of the Mahabharata’s Hindu God Krishna. This comparison shows the feminist and postcolonial import of Devi’s story, as it demonstrates the continuity of caste-based tribal exploitation from antiquity (...)
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  9.  17
    Imagology and Exoticism in Montesquieu’s Persian Letters.Yousefi Behzadi Majid - 2013 - Human and Social Studies 2 (3):113-123.
    This article aims at highlighting the specificities of Gaston Bachelard’s «La poétique de la rêverie», seen as the pivot of Motesquieu’s imaginary creation in Persian Letters. The Same and the Other are two essential terms when trying to find the place imagology plays in an intercultural approach where France and Persia are associated with an enchanted exoticism. Criteria such as space, taste, the marvellous and verisimilitude will be examined in order to analyse the images vehiculated by the perceived (...)
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  10.  2
    Lettres Philosophiques. Voltaire - 2010 - Classiques Garnier.
    Selon l'expression de Lanson, les Lettres philosophiques sont «la première bombe lancée contre l'Ancien Régime». L'ouvrage connaît deux éditions: une édition anglaise et une édition française, qui comporte une vingt-cinquième lettre «Sur les Pensées de M. Pascal». Les Lettres anglaises sont devenues philosophiques: elle sont aussi immédiatement condamnées.On trouvera ici le texte de cette édition, accompagné d'un choix de variantes et d'un ensemble d'esquisses et d'avant-textes. Surtout, la présente édition fait le pari de montrer la cohérence de l'ouvrage à la (...)
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  11.  2
    Voltaire, Lettres Philosophiques.Dennis Fletcher - 1986 - Grant & Cutler.
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  12.  39
    Candide. Voltaire - 2006 - In Thomas L. Cooksey (ed.), Masterpieces of Philosophical Literature. Greenwood Press.
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  13. On Rhetorical Ricochet: Expressivity of Nominalization and Da in Japanese Discourse.Senko K. Maynard - 1999 - Discourse Studies 1 (1):57-81.
    This article investigates the grammatical aspects of nominalization and the Japanese da predicate as critical strategies for realizing the effect of what I call `rhetorical ricochet' in Japanese discourse. The study explores the expressive function of the nominal/nominalizer and da in 28 imaginary letters appearing in asahi Shimbun as well as a literary text along with its English translation. I conclude that the combination of a certain kind of nominal/nominalizer and the da predicate reinforces the topic-comment relationship, through (...)
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  14. Descartes on the Infinity of Space Vs. Time.Geoffrey Gorham - 2018 - In Ohad Nachtomy & Reed Winegar (eds.), Infinity in Early Modern Philosophy. Berlin: Brill. pp. 45-61.
    In two rarely discussed passages – from unpublished notes on the Principles of Philosophy and a 1647 letter to Chanut – Descartes argues that the question of the infinite extension of space is importantly different from the infinity of time. In both passages, he is anxious to block the application of his well-known argument for the indefinite extension of space to time, in order to avoid the theologically problematic implication that the world has no beginning. Descartes concedes that we always (...)
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  15. Mad Speculation and Absolute Inhumanism: Lovecraft, Ligotti, and the Weirding of Philosophy.Ben Woodard - 2011 - Continent 1 (1):3-13.
    continent. 1.1 : 3-13. / 0/ – Introduction I want to propose, as a trajectory into the philosophically weird, an absurd theoretical claim and pursue it, or perhaps more accurately, construct it as I point to it, collecting the ground work behind me like the Perpetual Train from China Mieville's Iron Council which puts down track as it moves reclaiming it along the way. The strange trajectory is the following: Kant's critical philosophy and much of continental philosophy which has followed, (...)
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  16.  13
    Seneca e la passione come esperienza fisica.Stefano Maso - 2018 - Elenchos 39 (2):377-401.
    If the ancient Stoics conceived passion as a judgment or the consequence of a judgment referring to external reality, it is correct to define their conception of the psyche as ‘monistic’; it is very different if we consider that passion is due to another faculty independent of reason. In this second case, a scenario opens up in which a realistic and ‘reified’ conception of passion emerges. With reference to this, in the Letter 113 Seneca discusses the paradoxical thesis of the (...)
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  17.  47
    August in England.Keith Tester - 2012 - Thesis Eleven 109 (1):4-10.
    In early August 2011, disturbances broke out in a number of English cities. What happened was broadcast globally, and all of a sudden it seemed as if all of the country was about to burst into flames. This short paper is offered by way of a ‘letter’ from England. It was written in late August 2011 and is an initial attempt to develop an understanding of why the disturbances broke out, what motivated the people who were involved and, indeed, why (...)
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  18.  51
    Locke’s Finely Spun Liberty.Jack D. Davidson - 2003 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 33 (2):203 - 227.
    Near the end of the long and often convoluted discussion of freedom in the chapter ‘Of Power’ in An Essay concerning Human Understanding, Locke states that in ‘The care of ourselves, that we mistake not imaginary for real happiness, is the necessary foundation of our liberty’. He goes on to explain that ‘we are by the necessity of preferring and pursuing true happiness as our greatest good, obliged to suspend the satisfaction of our desire in particular cases’. Locke then (...)
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  19.  73
    Spinoza's Three Gods and the Modes of Communication.Etienne Balibar - 2012 - European Journal of Philosophy 20 (1):26-49.
    The paper, which retains a hypothetical character, argues that Spinoza's propositions referring to God (or involving the use of the name ‘God’, essentially in the Ethics), can be read in a fruitful manner apart from any pre-established hypothesis concerning his own ‘theological preferences’, as definite descriptions of three ‘ideas of God’ which have the same logical status: one (akin to Jewish Monotheism) which identifies the idea of God with the idea of the Law, one (akin to a heretic ‘Socinian’ version (...)
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  20.  34
    An Early European Critic of Hobbes’s De Corpore.Stephen Clucas - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (1):4-27.
    _ Source: _Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 4 - 27 The _Animadversiones in Elementorum Philosophiae_ by a little known Flemish scholar G. Moranus, published in Brussels in 1655 was an early European response to Hobbes’s _De Corpore_. Although it is has been referred to by various Hobbes scholars, such as Noel Malcolm, Doug Jesseph, and Alexander Bird it has been little studied. Previous scholarship has tended to focus on the mathematical criticisms of André Tacquet which Moranus included in the form (...)
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  21. Political Poetry: A Few Notes. Poetics for N30.Jeroen Mettes - 2012 - Continent 2 (1):29-35.
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 29–35. Translated by Vincent W.J. van Gerven Oei from Jeroen Mettes. "Politieke Poëzie: Enige aantekeningen, Poëtica bij N30 (versie 2006)." In Weerstandbeleid: Nieuwe kritiek . Amsterdam: De wereldbibliotheek, 2011. Published with permission of Uitgeverij Wereldbibliotheek, Amsterdam. L’égalité veut d’autres lois . —Eugène Pottier The modern poem does not have form but consistency (that is sensed), no content but a problem (that is developed). Consistency + problem = composition. The problem of modern poetry is capitalism. Capitalism—which has no (...)
     
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  22. Sitting in the Dock of the Bay, Watching ….Jeremy Fernando - 2013 - Continent 3 (2):8-12.
    This piece, included in the drift special issue of continent. , was created as one step in a thread of inquiry. While each of the contributions to drift stand on their own, the project was an attempt to follow a line of theoretical inquiry as it passed through time and the postal service(s) from October 2012 until May 2013. This issue hosts two threads: between space & place and between intention & attention . The editors recommend that to experience the (...)
     
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  23.  4
    Leibniz on Bodies and Infinities: Rerum Natura and Mathematical Fictions.Mikhail G. Katz, Karl Kuhlemann, David Sherry & Monica Ugaglia - forthcoming - Review of Symbolic Logic:1-31.
    The way Leibniz applied his philosophy to mathematics has been the subject of longstanding debates. A key piece of evidence is his letter to Masson on bodies. We offer an interpretation of this often misunderstood text, dealing with the status of infinite divisibility in nature, rather than in mathematics. In line with this distinction, we offer a reading of the fictionality of infinitesimals. The letter has been claimed to support a reading of infinitesimals according to which they are logical fictions, (...)
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  24. A Playful Reading of the Double Quotation in The Descent of Alette by Alice Notley.Feliz Molina - 2011 - Continent 1 (4):230-233.
    continent. 1.4 (2011): 230—233. A word about the quotation marks. People ask about them, in the beginning; in the process of giving themselves up to reading the poem, they become comfortable with them, without necessarily thinking precisely about why they’re there. But they’re there, mostly to measure the poem. The phrases they enclose are poetic feet. If I had simply left white spaces between the phrases, the phrases would be read too fast for my musical intention. The quotation marks make (...)
     
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  25.  72
    God's Dice.Vasil Penchev - 2015 - In S. Oms, J. Martínez, M. García-Carpintero & J. Díez (eds.), Actas: VIII Conference of the Spanish Society for Logic, Methodology, and Philosophy of Sciences. Barcelona: Universitat de Barcelona. pp. 297-303.
    Einstein wrote his famous sentence "God does not play dice with the universe" in a letter to Max Born in 1920. All experiments have confirmed that quantum mechanics is neither wrong nor “incomplete”. One can says that God does play dice with the universe. Let quantum mechanics be granted as the rules generalizing all results of playing some imaginary God’s dice. If that is the case, one can ask how God’s dice should look like. God’s dice turns out to (...)
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  26. Publish and Be Damned? Continent. Visits Independent Publishers Fair.Bernhard Garnicnig - 2012 - Continent 2 (4):269-288.
    I love books for many things, but I despise them for introducing a physical limit to the free circulation of knowledge (compared to the Internet). At least, that's what I had always thought. continent. is an online journal aiming at, among other things, breaking with the established paradigms of how academic work has to be published in order to be respected among relevant peers. I'm the engineer behind the current version of continent. , making it work and keeping it running (...)
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  27. Drift: A Way.David Prater - 2013 - Continent 3 (2):31-33.
    This piece, included in the drift special issue of continent. , was created as one step in a thread of inquiry. While each of the contributions to drift stand on their own, the project was an attempt to follow a line of theoretical inquiry as it passed through time and the postal service(s) from October 2012 until May 2013. This issue hosts two threads: between space & place and between intention & attention . The editors recommend that to experience the (...)
     
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  28.  53
    The Purloined Poe. Lacan, Derrida and Psychoanalytic Readings. [REVIEW]Wilfried Ver Eecke - 1991 - Review of Metaphysics 44 (4):858-859.
    This book is an anthology of both previously published and unpublished material consisting of four parts: "Poe and Lacan," "On psychoanalytic reading," "Derrida and responses," and "Other readings." The heart of the anthology is, however, the debate between the psychoanalyst Lacan and the philosopher Derrida. The debate concerns the interpretation of a story written by Poe, "The Purloined Letter." To his long essay on Poe, Lacan gave pride of place by pulling it out of chronological order and placing it as (...)
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  29.  10
    Kai For Et.Leofranc Holford-Strevens - 1992 - Classical Quarterly 42 (01):284-.
    The late Sir Roger Mynors, in a letter to Sebastiano Timpanaro quoted in the latter's Contributi difilologia e di storia della lingua latina , p. 543 n. 15, states that he had wondered ‘whether it might be a habit of Latin writers, when they were putting only one or two “parolette” between two pieces of Greek’, to use Greek rather than Latin: he invents as an example ‘θος κα πθος where logic demanded θος et πθος’. The answer is that they (...)
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  30.  4
    Margaret Cavendish: Political Writings.Susan James (ed.) - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, published a wide variety of works including poems, plays, letters and treatises of natural philosophy, but her significance as a political writer has only recently been recognised. This major contribution to the series of Cambridge Texts includes the first ever modern edition of her Divers Orations on English social and political life, together with a new student-friendly rendition of her imaginary voyage, A New World called the Blazing World. Susan James explains the allusions (...)
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  31.  2
    From Illiteracy to Literature: Psychoanalysis and Reading.Anne-Marie Picard - 2016 - Routledge.
    _From Illiteracy to Literature_ presents innovative material based on research with ‘non-reading’ children and re-examines the complex relationship between psychoanalysis and literature, through the lens of the psychical significance of reading: the forgotten adventure of our coming to reading. Anne-Marie Picard draws on two specific fields of interest: firstly the wish to understand the nature of literariness or the "literary effect", i.e. the pleasures we derive from reading; secondly research on reading pathologies carried out at St Anne’s Hospital, Paris. The (...)
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  32.  7
    Plato’s Political Writings: A Utopia?Luc Brisson - 2020 - Polis 37 (3):399-420.
    Thomas More’s 1516 Utopia describes a ‘fictitious’ republic on an imaginary island, and draws heavily on ancient political ideas. This paper explores the difficulties of applying the term ‘utopia’ to Plato’s political thinking, given that More’s term is anachronistically applied to ancient texts. The projects of the Republic and Laws should not be interpreted as ‘utopian’, but as blueprints for a foundation such as a new city, rather than as imagined ideal cities after More’s model. Support for Plato’s practical (...)
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  33.  14
    Acheronta Movebo.Jean Starobinski & Françoise Meltzer - 1987 - Critical Inquiry 13 (2):394-407.
    It is doubtless appropriate to read The Interpretation of Dreams according to the image of the journey which Sigmund Freud describes in a letter to Wilhelm Fliess:The whole thing is planned on the model of an imaginary walk. First comes the dark wood of the authorities , where there is no clear view and it is easy to go astray. Then there is a cavernous defile through which I lead my readers—my specimen dream with its peculiarities, its details, its (...)
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  34.  32
    Introduction to Husserl’s Lecture On the Concept of Number.Carlo Ierna - 2005 - New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 5:276-277.
    Among the various lecture courses that Edmund Husserl held during his time as a Privatdozent at the University of Halle (1887-1901), there was one on Ausgewählte Fragen aus der Philosophie der Mathematik (Selected Questions from the Philosophy of Mathematics), which he gave twice, once in the WS 1889/90 and again in WS 1890/91. As Husserl reports in his letter to Carl Stumpf of February 1890, he lectured mainly on “spatial-logical questions” and gave an extensive critique of the Riemann-Helmholtz theories. Indeed, (...)
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  35.  16
    Between Hope and Terror: Habermas and Derrida Plead for the Im/Possible. To Jacques Derrida in Memoriam.Martin Beck Matuštík - 2004 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (1):1-18.
    His Paulskirche speech on October 14, 2001, marked Habermas’s turn to public criticism of the unilateral politics of global hegemony as he promoted a globaldomestic and human rights policy. Two years later he joined ranks with Jacques Derrida against the eight “new” Europeans who lent signatures to the second Gulf War. Lest we misjudge the joint letter by Habermas and Derrida as peculiarly Eurocentric and even oblivious to the worldwide nature of the antiwar protest on February 15, 2003, we must (...)
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  36.  5
    Zwei Stimmen aus der Renaissancedebatte um die Person Ciceros.Günter Gawlick - 2014 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 17 (1):150-165.
    In his essay the author draws attention to two 16th century humanists who engaged in the debate on Cicero the Man. In 1534, Ortensio Lando, a man of letters, published Cicero relegatus & Cicero revocatus, which was a collection of objections to Cicero’s character and habits brought forward in an imaginary conversation, as well as of arguments in his defence proposed in an equally fictitious public hearing, thus producing an apparent equilibrium. Lando, however, did not leave us guessing (...)
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  37.  5
    Between Hope and Terror: Habermas and Derrida Plead for the Im/Possible. To Jacques Derrida in Memoriam.Martin Beck Matuštík - 2004 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (1):1-18.
    His Paulskirche speech on October 14, 2001, marked Habermas’s turn to public criticism of the unilateral politics of global hegemony as he promoted a globaldomestic and human rights policy. Two years later he joined ranks with Jacques Derrida against the eight “new” Europeans who lent signatures to the second Gulf War. Lest we misjudge the joint letter by Habermas and Derrida as peculiarly Eurocentric and even oblivious to the worldwide nature of the antiwar protest on February 15, 2003, we must (...)
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  38. Imaginary Bodies: Ethics, Power and Corporeality.Moira Gatens - 1995 - Routledge.
    Moira Gatens investigates the ways in which differently sexed bodies can occupy the same social or political space. Representations of sexual difference have unacknowledged philosophical roots which cannot be dismissed as a superficial bias on the part of the philosopher, nor removed without destroying the coherence of the philosophical system concerned. The deep structural bias against women extends beyond metaphysics and its effects are felt in epistemology, moral, social and political theory. The idea of sexual difference is contextualised in _Imaginary (...)
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  39. Social Imaginaries in Debate.John Krummel, Suzi Adams, Jeremy Smith, Natalie Doyle & Paul Blokker - 2015 - Social Imaginaries 1 (1):15-52.
    A collaborative article by the Editorial Collective of Social Imaginaries. Investigations into social imaginaries have burgeoned in recent years. From ‘the capitalist imaginary’ to the ‘democratic imaginary’, from the ‘ecological imaginary’ to ‘the global imaginary’ – and beyond – the social imaginaries field has expanded across disciplines and beyond the academy. The recent debates on social imaginaries and potential new imaginaries reveal a recognisable field and paradigm-in-the-making. We argue that Castoriadis, Ricoeur, and Taylor have articulated the (...)
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  40.  37
    The Imaginary Institution of Society.Cornelius Castoriadis - 1997 - MIT Press.
    As a work of social theory, I would argue that it belongs in a class with the writings of Habermas and Arendt". -- Jay Bernstein, University of Essex This is one of the most original and important works of contemporary European thought.
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  41. Imaginary Foundations.Wolfgang Schwarz - 2018 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 5.
    Our senses provide us with information about the world, but what exactly do they tell us? I argue that in order to optimally respond to sensory stimulations, an agent’s doxastic space may have an extra, “imaginary” dimension of possibility; perceptual experiences confer certainty on propositions in this dimension. To some extent, the resulting picture vindicates the old-fashioned empiricist idea that all empirical knowledge is based on a solid foundation of sense-datum propositions, but it avoids most of the problems traditionally (...)
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  42.  12
    The Imaginary: A Phenomenological Psychology of the Imagination.Jean-Paul Sartre - 2004 - Routledge.
    A cornerstone of Sartre’s philosophy, _The Imaginary_ was first published in 1940. Sartre had become acquainted with the philosophy of Edmund Husserl in Berlin and was fascinated by his idea of the 'intentionality of consciousness' as a key to the puzzle of existence. Against this background, _The Imaginary_ crystallized Sartre's worldview and artistic vision. The book is an extended examination of the concepts of nothingness and freedom, both of which are derived from the ability of consciousness to imagine objects both (...)
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  43.  92
    The Imaginary: A Phenomenological Psychology of the Imagination.Jean-Paul Sartre - 2004 - Routledge.
    Webber's perceptive new introduction helps to decipher this challenging, seminal work, placing it in the context of the author's work and the history of ...
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  44.  7
    The Imaginary: A Phenomenological Psychology of the Imagination.Jean-Paul Sartre - 2004 - Routledge.
    A cornerstone of Sartre’s philosophy, _The Imaginary_ was first published in 1940. Sartre had become acquainted with the philosophy of Edmund Husserl in Berlin and was fascinated by his idea of the 'intentionality of consciousness' as a key to the puzzle of existence. Against this background, _The Imaginary_ crystallized Sartre's worldview and artistic vision. The book is an extended examination of the concepts of nothingness and freedom, both of which are derived from the ability of consciousness to imagine objects both (...)
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  45.  75
    Imaginary Cases in Ethics: A Critique.Michael Davis - 2012 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (1):1-17.
    By “case,” I mean a proxy for some state of affairs, event, sequence of events, or other fact. A case may be as short as a phrase or longer than War and Peace. A case may consist of words or have a more dramatic form, such as a movie, stage performance, or computer simulation. Imaginary cases plainly have an important role in contemporary ethics, especially in applied or practical ethics. This paper is a systematic critique of imaginary cases (...)
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  46. Containing the Atom: Sociotechnical Imaginaries and Nuclear Power in the United States and South Korea.Sheila Jasanoff & Sang-Hyun Kim - 2009 - Minerva 47 (2):119-146.
    STS research has devoted relatively little attention to the promotion and reception of science and technology by non-scientific actors and institutions. One consequence is that the relationship of science and technology to political power has tended to remain undertheorized. This article aims to fill that gap by introducing the concept of sociotechnical imaginaries. Through a comparative examination of the development and regulation of nuclear power in the US and South Korea, the article demonstrates the analytic potential of the imaginaries concept. (...)
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  47. The Imaginary Museum of Musical Works: An Essay in the Philosophy of Music.Lydia Goehr - 1992 - Oxford University Press.
    What is the difference between a performance of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony and the symphony itself? What does it mean for musicians to be faithful to the works they perform? To answer this question, Goehr combines philosophical and historical methods of enquiry. She describes how the concept of a musical work emerged as late as 1800, and how it subsequently defined the norms, expectations, and behavior characteristic of classical musical practice. Out of the historical thesis, Goehr draws philosophical conclusions about the (...)
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  48.  13
    The Imaginary Domain: Abortion, Pornography and Sexual Harrassment.Drucilla Cornell - 1995 - Routledge.
    First published in 1995. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  49.  9
    Why Imaginary Worlds?Edgar Dubourg & Nicolas Baumard - forthcoming - Behavioral and Brain Sciences:1-52.
    Imaginary worlds are extremely successful. The most popular fictions produced in the last decades contain such a fictional world. They can be found in all fictional media, from novels to films, video games, graphic novels and TV series, and they date as far back as ancient literature. Why such a success? Why so much attention devoted to nonexistent worlds? In this article, we propose that imaginary worlds co-opt our preferences for exploration, which have evolved in humans and non-human (...)
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  50. Letter From a Former President.Ann Astell - 2018 - The Bulletin of the Colloquium on Violence and Religion 57:18-18.
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