Results for 'Ian Plato'

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  1.  16
    Euthyphro.Ian Plato & Walker - 1984 - Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. Edited by C. J. Emlyn-Jones, William Preddy & Plato.
    Plato of Athens, who laid the foundations of the Western philosophical tradition and in range and depth ranks among its greatest practitioners, was born to a prosperous and politically active family circa 427 BC. In early life an admirer of Socrates, Plato later founded the first institution of higher learning in the West, the Academy, among whose many notable alumni was Aristotle. Traditionally ascribed to Plato are thirty-five dialogues developing Socrates' dialectic method and composed with great stylistic (...)
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  2.  28
    Studies in Plato's Two-Level Model (review).Ian Mueller - 2000 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (2):272-273.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Studies in Plato's Two-Level ModelIan MuellerHolger Thesleff. Studies in Plato's Two-Level Model. Helsinki: Societas Scientarum Fennica, 1999. Pp. vi + 143. N. P.After some 30 years of incisive intervention in Platonic scholarship, Holger Thesleff here offers us "an attempt to elaborate and ground more firmly some basic theses which I have propounded in various contexts before," (1) a rather modest description of what he also describes (...)
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  3. Protagoras and Plato in Aristotle: Rereading the Measure Doctrine.Ian C. McCready-Flora - 2015 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 49:71-127.
  4.  50
    Al-Fārābī and his school.Ian Richard Netton - 1999 - Richmond, Surrey: Curzon.
    Al-Farabi and His School examines one of the most exciting and dynamic periods in the development of medieval Islam: the period which ran from the late ninth century to the early eleventh century AD. This age is examined through the thought of five of its principal thinkers and named after the first and greatest of these as the "Age of Farabism." Ian Richard Netton demonstrates that the great Islamic philosopher al-Farabi (870-950), called "the Second Master" after Aristotle, produced a recognizable (...)
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  5.  42
    Plato, the Eristics, and the Principle of Non-Contradiction.Ian J. Campbell - 2021 - Apeiron 54 (4):571-614.
    This paper considers the use that Plato makes of the Principle of Non-Contradiction in his engagements with eristic refutations. By examining Plato’s use of the principle in his most detailed engagements with eristic—in the Sophist, the discussion of “agonistic” argumentation in the Theaetetus, and especially the Euthydemus—I aim to show that the pressure exerted on Plato by eristic refutations played a crucial role in his development of the PNC, and that the principle provided him with a much (...)
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  6. Plato’s Timaeus and the Limits of Natural Science.Ian MacFarlane - 2023 - Apeiron 56 (3):495-517.
    The relationship between mind and necessity is one of the major points of difficulty for the interpretation of Plato’s Timaeus. At times Timaeus seems to say the demiurge is omnipotent in his creation, and at other times seems to say he is limited by pre-existing matter. Most interpretations take one of the two sides, but this paper proposes a novel approach to interpreting this issue which resolves the difficulty. This paper suggests that in his speech Timaeus presents two hypothetical (...)
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  7.  58
    Ambiguity and Fallacy in Plato's Euthydemus.Ian J. Campbell - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (1):67-92.
  8.  7
    Protagoras and Plato in Aristotle: Rereading the Measure Doctrine.Ian C. McCready-Flora - 2015 - In Brad Inwood (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, Volume 49. Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press UK. pp. 71-128.
    We have far less evidence for Aristotle’s reception of Protagoras than we like to think, and the evidence we do have is somewhere we hardly ever look. With one exception, every reference Aristotle makes to the Measure Doctrine—Protagoras’ claim that humans are the ‘measure of all things —concerns the Doctrine as amplified in Plato’s Theaetetus, and the ‘Protagoras’ in question is Plato’s fictional character as fictional. Metaph. I 1, 1053a35–b3 provides the only exception, where Aristotle offers an anomalous (...)
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  9.  8
    Self-intellection and Its Epistemological Origins in Ancient Greek Thought.Ian M. Crystal - 2002 - Routledge.
    Can the intellect or the intellectual faculty be its own object of thought, or can it not think or apprehend itself? This book explores the ancient treatments of the question of self-intellection - an important theme in ancient epistemology and of considerable interest to later philosophical thought. The manner in which the ancients dealt with the intellect apprehending itself, took them into both the metaphysical and epistemological domains with reflections on questions of thinking, identity and causality. Ian Crystal traces the (...)
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  10. Private caves and public islands : Islam, Plato, and the Ikhwān al-Ṣafā'.Ian Richard Netton - 2009 - In Maha Elkaisy-Friemuth & John Myles Dillon (eds.), The afterlife of the Platonic soul: reflections of Platonic psychology in the monotheistic religions. Boston: Brill.
  11.  24
    Plato’s Timaeus and the limits of natural science.Ian J. MacFarlane - 2022 - Dissertation, University of Texas at Austin
    The Timaeus is perhaps the most unusual of Plato’s dialogues. In this paper, I attempt to interpret Timaeus’s strange speech, which makes up most of the dialogue. I argue that Timaeus has grasped the grave challenge posed to philosophic reason by men like Hesiod who claim that mysterious gods are the first causes of the world, and therefore one cannot say that there are any true necessities governing this world. If this is true, then philosophy, as the study of (...)
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  12. Why is there Philosophy of Mathematics AT ALL?Ian Hacking - 2011 - South African Journal of Philosophy 30 (1):1-15.
    Mathematics plays an inordinate role in the work of many of famous Western philosophers, from the time of Plato, through Husserl and Wittgenstein, and even to the present. Why? This paper points to the experience of learning or making mathematics, with an emphasis on proof. It distinguishes two sources of the perennial impact of mathematics on philosophy. They are classified as Ancient and Enlightenment. Plato is emblematic of the former, and Kant of the latter. The Ancient fascination arises (...)
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  13.  11
    Res et Verba in der Renaissance.Eckhard Kessler & Ian Maclean (eds.) - 2002 - Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz in Kommission.
    Aus dem Inhalt: I. Maclean, Introduction M.J. B. Allen, In principio: Marsilio Ficino on the Life of Text D. Perler, Diskussionen uber mentale Sprache im 16. Jahrhundert E. Kessler, Die verborgene Gegenwart und Funktion des Nominalismus in der Renaissance-Philosophie: das Problem der Universalien A. De Pace, Copernicus against a Rhetorical Approach to the Beauty of the Universe. The Influence of the Phaedo on the De revolutionibus H. Mikkeli, Art and Nature in the Renaissance Commentaries and Textbooks on Aristotle's Physics U. (...)
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  14.  9
    Μνήμης... Φάρμακον at Plato 'Phaedrus' 274e-275a:: An Imitation of Euripides fr. 578?Ian Rutherford - 1990 - Hermes 118 (3):377-379.
  15.  43
    Joan Kung's Reading of Plato's "Timaeus".Ian Mueller - 1989 - Apeiron 22 (4):1 - 27.
  16.  13
    Joan Kung's Reading of Plato's Timaeus.Ian Mueller - 1989 - Apeiron 22 (4):1-28.
  17.  4
    Greek Mathematics to the Time of Euclid.Ian Mueller - 2018 - In Sean D. Kirkland & Eric Sanday (eds.), A Companion to Ancient Philosophy. Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press. pp. 686–718.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Euclid's Elements First Principles Aspects of Euclid's Plane Geometry Proportionality Greek Arithmetic and its History On the History of Greek Geometry Conclusion Bibliography.
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  18. The Healthy City Versus the Luxurious City in Plato’s Republic: Lessons about Consumption and Sustainability in a Globalizing Economy.ian Deweese-Boyd & Margaret Deweese-Boyd - 2007 - Contemporary Justice Review 10 (1):115-30.
    Early in Plato’s Republic, two cities are depicted, one healthy and one with “a fever”—the so- called luxurious city. The operative difference between these two cities is that the citizens of the latter “have surrendered themselves to the endless acquisition of money and have overstepped the limit of their necessities” (373d).i The luxury of this latter city requires the seizure of neighboring lands and consequently a standing army to defend those lands and the city’s wealth. According to the main (...)
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  19.  50
    On some academic theories of mathematical objects.Ian Mueller - 1986 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 106:111-120.
    In his critical study of Speusippus Leonardo Tarán (T.) expounds an interpretation of a considerable part of the controversial books M and N of Aristotle's Metaphysics. In this essay I want to consider three aspects of the interpretation, the account of Plato's ‘ideal numbers’ (section I), the account of Speusippus’ mathematical ontology (section II), and the account of the principles of that ontology (section III). T. builds his interpretation squarely on the work of Harold Cherniss (C.), to whom I (...)
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  20.  25
    Proclus: Neo-Platonic Philosophy and Science.Ian Mueller & Lucas Siorvanes - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (4):600.
    Proclus Platonic Academy) is undoubtedly one of the most influential figures in the history of western philosophy; his writings did more to shape pre-twentieth-century understandings of Plato than any other person. But today few students of ancient philosophy would cite Proclus as an authority on Plato, and only a few scholars and certain people whom many would identify as enthusiasts or mystics are likely to have read a whole work of Proclus, even in translation. And although there are (...)
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  21.  22
    Theoria_ and _Darśan: pilgrimage and vision in Greece and India.Ian Rutherford - 2000 - Classical Quarterly 50 (01):133-.
    THEORIA IN GREEK RELIGION What was the Greek for pilgrim? If there is no simple answer, the explanation is the great diversity of ancient pilgrimages and pilgrimage-related phenomena. People went to sanctuaries for all sorts of reasons: consulting oracles, attending festivals, making sacrifices, watching the Panhellenic games, or seeking a cure for illness; there were variations in the participants , and variations in the length of distance traversed to get to the sanctuary; finally, changes occurred in the shape of pilgrimage (...)
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  22. Plato.John Dunn & Ian Harris - 1997
  23.  92
    Affect and Sensation: Plato’s Embodied Cognition.Ian McCready-Flora - 2018 - Phronesis 63 (2):117-147.
    _ Source: _Volume 63, Issue 2, pp 117 - 147 I argue that Plato, in the _Timaeus_, draws deep theoretical distinctions between sensation and affect, which comprises pleasure, pain, desire and emotion. Sensation is both ‘fine-grained’ and ‘immediate’. Emotions, by contrast, are mediated and coarse-grained. Pleasure and pain are coarse-grained but, in a range of important cases, immediate. The _Theaetetus_ assimilates affect to sensation in a way the _Timaeus_ does not. Smell frustrates Timaeus because it is coarse-grained, although unlike (...)
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  24.  20
    Ancient Relativity: Plato, Aristotle, Stoics, and Sceptics by Matthew Duncombe. [REVIEW]Ian J. Campbell - 2022 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 60 (4):688-690.
    In this book, Matthew Duncombe argues that Plato, Aristotle, certain Stoics, and Sextus Empiricus each held a broadly "constitutive" view of relativity. According to constitutive accounts, a "relative" is constituted by the relation that it bears to its "correlative". Such treatments of relativity sharply contrast with more familiar nonconstitutive accounts, according to which standing in some relation suffices for being a relative. On such a view, versions of which many scholars have assumed to be at work in antiquity, Alcibiades (...)
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  25.  83
    Plato’s Philosophy of Mathematics. [REVIEW]Ian Mueller - 1997 - Ancient Philosophy 17 (2):458-461.
  26.  59
    Expanding process: Exploring philosophical and theological transformations in china and the west (review). [REVIEW]Ian M. Sullivan - 2011 - Philosophy East and West 61 (4):741-744.
    Expanding Process, Exploring Philosophical and Theological Transformations in China and the West, by John Berthrong, is a model study of processive motifs in Chinese traditions and their contributions to global process-relational philosophy. Process-relational philosophy, which became a full-fledged school of thought in the twentieth century with the works of Alfred North Whitehead and the American Pragmatists, conceives of reality as constant flux. This metaphysical view is opposed to the substance-ontological view, which understands reality as a composition of timeless, discrete substances, (...)
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  27.  8
    Stiegler and Technics.Gerald Moore, Christopher Johnson, Michael Lewis, Ian James, Serge Trottein & Patrick Crogan - 2013 - Critical Connections.
    These 17 essays covers all aspects of Bernard Stiegler's work, from poststructuralism, anthropology and psychoanalysis to his work on the politics of memory, 'libidinal economy', technoscience and aesthetics, keeping a focus on his key theory of technics throughout. Stiegler brings together key concepts from Plato, Freud, Derrida and Simondon to argue that the human is 'invented' through technics rather than a product of purely biological evolution. Stiegler is a thinker at the forefront of our contemporary concerns with consumerism, technology, (...)
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  28.  5
    Explorations in Information Space: Knowledge, Agents, and Organization.Max H. Boisot, Ian C. MacMillan & Kyeong Seok Han - 2007 - Oxford University Press UK.
    With the rise of the knowledge economy, the knowledge content of goods and services is going up just as their material content is declining. Economic value is increasingly seen to reside in the former - that is, in intangible assets - rather than in the latter. Yet we keep wanting to turn knowledge back into something tangible, something with definite boundaries which can be measured, manipulated, appropriated, and traded. In short, we want to reify knowledge. Scholars have been debating the (...)
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  29. Plato's joints – job talk (version 1/18/08).Laura Franklin-Hall - unknown
    Plato’s Socrates says in the Phaedrus that we should “cut up each kind according to its species along its natural joints, and to try not to splinter any part, as a bad butcher might” (265e). In the Statesman Plato’s interlocutors make the similar suggestion that kinds should be divided from one another “limb by limb, like a sacrificial animal” (287c). This jointing metaphor is often used to illustrate the divisibility of the natural world into objective kinds or natural (...)
     
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  30. Platonic approaches to individual sciences: Aristotelian objections and post-Aristotelian responses to Plato's elemental theory / Ian Mueller. In defence of geometric atomism : explaining elemental properties / Jan Opsomer. Plato's geography : Damascius' interpretation of the Phaedo myth / Carlos Steel. Neoplatonists on 'spontaneous' generation / James Wilberding. Aspects of biology in Plotinus. [REVIEW]Christoph Horn - 2012 - In James Wilberding & Christoph Horn (eds.), Neoplatonism and the Philosophy of Nature. Oxford Up.
  31.  4
    An Examination of Plato's Doctrines (RLE: Plato): Volume 1 Plato on Man and Society.I. M. Crombie - 1962 - Routledge.
    Ian Crombie’s impressive volumes provide a comprehensive interpretation of Plato’s doctrines. Volume 1 contains topics of more general interest and is mainly concerned with what Plato has to say in the fields of moral philosophy, political philosophy, the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of religion.
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  32.  19
    An Examination of Plato's Doctrines : Volume 1 Plato on Man and Society.I. Crombie - 1962 - Routledge.
    Ian Crombie’s impressive volumes provide a comprehensive interpretation of Plato’s doctrines. Volume 1 contains topics of more general interest and is mainly concerned with what Plato has to say in the fields of moral philosophy, political philosophy, the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of religion.
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  33.  59
    An Examination of Plato's Doctrines Vol 2 : Volume 2 Plato on Knowledge and Reality.I. M. Crombie - 1963 - Routledge.
    Ian Crombie’s impressive volumes provide a comprehensive interpretation of Plato’s doctrines. Volume 2 deals with more technical philosophical topics, including the theory of knowledge, philosophy of nature, and the methodology of science and philosophy. Each volume is self-contained.
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  34.  12
    Eckhart, Heidegger, and the imperative of releasement.Ian Alexander Moore - 2019 - Albany: SUNY Press, State University of New York Press.
    In the late Middle Ages the philosopher and mystic Meister Eckhart preached that to know the truth you must be the truth. But how to be the truth? Eckhart's answer comes in the form of an imperative: release yourself, let be. Only then will you be able to understand that the deepest meaning of being is releasement. Only then will you become who you truly are. This book interprets Eckhart's Latin and Middle High German writings under the banner of an (...)
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  35. Historical ontology.Ian Hacking - 2002 - Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
    The focus of this volume, which collects both recent and now-classic essays, is the historical emergence of concepts and objects, through new uses of words and ...
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  36.  28
    A scoping review of the perceptions of death in the context of organ donation and transplantation.Ian Kerridge, Cameron Stewart, Linda Sheahan, Lisa O’Reilly, Michael J. O’Leary, Cynthia Forlini, Dianne Walton-Sonda, Anil Ramnani & George Skowronski - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-20.
    BackgroundSocio-cultural perceptions surrounding death have profoundly changed since the 1950s with development of modern intensive care and progress in solid organ transplantation. Despite broad support for organ transplantation, many fundamental concepts and practices including brain death, organ donation after circulatory death, and some antemortem interventions to prepare for transplantation continue to be challenged. Attitudes toward the ethical issues surrounding death and organ donation may influence support for and participation in organ donation but differences between and among diverse populations have not (...)
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  37. Kant's first paralogism.Ian Proops - 2010 - Philosophical Review 119 (4):449–495.
    In the part of the first Critique known as “The Paralogisms of Pure Reason” Kant seeks to explain how even the most acute metaphysicians could have arrived, through speculation, at the ruefully dogmatic conclusion that the self (understood as the subject of thoughts or "thinking I") is a substance. His diagnosis has two components: first, the positing of the phenomenon of “Transcendental Illusion”—an illusion, modelled on but distinct from, optical illusion--that predisposes human beings to accept as sound--and as known to (...)
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  38. Mindreaders: the cognitive basis of "theory of mind".Ian Apperly - 2011 - New York: Psychology Press.
    Introduction -- Evidence from children -- Evidence form infants and non-human animals -- Evidence from neuroimaging and neuropsychology -- Evidence from adults -- The cognitive basis of mindreading -- Elaborating and applying the theory.
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  39. Russell on substitutivity and the abandonment of propositions.Ian Proops - 2011 - Philosophical Review 120 (2):151-205.
    The paper argues that philosophers commonly misidentify the substitutivity principle involved in Russell’s puzzle about substitutivity in “On Denoting”. This matters because when that principle is properly identified the puzzle becomes considerably sharper and more interesting than it is often taken to be. This article describes both the puzzle itself and Russell's solution to it, which involves resources beyond the theory of descriptions. It then explores the epistemological and metaphysical consequences of that solution. One such consequence, it argues, is that (...)
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  40. Dealbreakers and the Work of Immoral Artists.Ian Stoner - 2023 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 9 (3):389-407.
    A dealbreaker, in the sense developed in this essay, is a relationship between a person's psychology and an aspect of an artwork to which they are exposed. When a person has a dealbreaking aversion to an aspect of a work, they are blocked from embracing the work's aesthetically positive features. I characterize dealbreakers, distinguish this response from other negative responses to an artwork, and argue that the presence or absence of a dealbreaker is in some cases an appropriate target of (...)
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  41.  20
    Elegance in science: the beauty of simplicity.Ian Glynn - 2010 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Science is often thought of as a methodical but dull activity. But the finest science, the breakthroughs most admired and respected by scientists themselves, is characterized by elegance." "What does elegance mean in the context of science? Economy is a considerable part of it; creativity too. Sometimes, a suggested solution is so simple and neat that it elicits an exclamation of wonder from the observer. The greatest science, whether primarily theoretical or experimental, reflects a creative imagination." "In this book, the (...)
  42.  8
    Reading the past: current approaches to interpretation in archaeology.Ian Hodder - 1986 - New York: Cambridge University Press. Edited by Scott Hutson.
    The third edition of this classic introduction to archaeological theory and method has been fully updated to address the rapid development of theoretical debate throughout the discipline. Ian Hodder and Scott Hutson argue that archaeologists must consider a variety of perspectives in the complex and uncertain task of "translating the meaning of past texts into their own contemporary language". While remaining centered on the importance of meaning, agency and history, the authors explore the latest developments in post-structuralism, neo-evolutionary theory and (...)
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  43. Ethics and law for the health professions.Ian Kerridge - 1998 - Katoomba, N.S.W.: Social Science Press. Edited by Michael Lowe & John McPhee.
    Ethics and Law for the Health Professions is a cross-disciplinary medico-legal book whose previouseditions have been widely used in the medical world. This new 3rd edition is fully revised with all ethics and law topics updated to reflect recent developments. New chapters include dealing specifically with children, health care and the environment, infectious diseases, public health, and ethics and chronic disease. All law sections have been extensively re-visited by Dr Cameron Stewart. Its special features are its focus on a clinically (...)
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  44. The identity of indiscernibles.Ian Hacking - 1975 - Journal of Philosophy 72 (9):249-256.
  45. Replies to Critics of the Fiery Test of Critique.Ian Proops - 2024 - Kantian Review.
    A set of replies to critics of my 2021 book 'The Fiery Test of Critique: A Reading of Kant's Dialectic' (OUP). -/- The criticisms are based on talks given at an Author-meets-critics symposium at Princeton University on April 22nd, 2023. The critics are: Beatrice Longuenesse, Patricia Kitcher, Allen Wood, Des Hogan, and Anja Jauernig.
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  46.  11
    The Criterion of Legitimacy in a Government: Analysing Ian Shapiro’s Concept of Representative Democracy.Neetika Singh - 2024 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 41 (1):103-116.
    Ian Shapiro proposes a representative government that bases its understanding of truth on mature enlightenment philosophy. He examines various enlightenment and anti-enlightenment theories to substantiate his arguments in favour of verifiability as the criterion for defining truth. Contending such a concept of truth he specifies that it is possible only within a representative democracy as it can systematically undermine socially built readymade systems. To examine Shapiro’s fallibilist approach to truth, this paper critically analyses his concept of truth-telling for legitimizing a (...)
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  47. Freedom: a philosophical anthology.Ian Carter, Matthew H. Kramer & Hillel Steiner (eds.) - 2007 - Malden, MA: Blackwell.
    Edited by leading contributors to the literature, Freedom: An Anthology is the most complete anthology on social, political and economic freedom ever compiled. Offers a broad guide to the vast literature on social, political and economic freedom. Contains selections from the best scholarship of recent decades as well as classic writings from Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau and Kant among others. General and sectional introductions help to orient the reader. Compiled and edited by three important contributors to the field.
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  48. Logical Necessity.Ian Rumfitt - 2010 - In Bob Hale & Aviv Hoffmann (eds.), Modality: metaphysics, logic, and epistemology. Oxford University Press.
    Book synopsis: The philosophy of modality investigates necessity and possibility, and related notions--are they objective features of mind-independent reality? If so, are they irreducible, or can modal facts be explained in other terms? This volume presents new work on modality by established leaders in the field and by up-and-coming philosophers. Between them, the papers address fundamental questions concerning realism and anti-realism about modality, the nature and basis of facts about what is possible and what is necessary, the nature of modal (...)
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  49. The End of Instrumentality? Heidegger on Phronēsis and Calculative Thinking.Ian Alexander Moore - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (3):255-261.
    The aim of Dimitris Vardoulakis’s paper, ‘Toward a Critique of the Ineffectual: Heidegger’s Reading of Aristotle and the Construction of an Action without Ends’, is to provide the foundation for a critique of aimless action by tracing its genesis to Heidegger’s putative misinterpretation of Aristotelian phronēsis (practical wisdom) in the 1920s. Inasmuch as ‘the ineffectual’—the name Vardoulakis gives to action devoid of ends—plays a crucial role in post-Heideggerian continental philosophy, he thereby seeks to diagnose and to provide an aetiology of (...)
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  50. Varieties of Philosophical Misanthropy.Ian James Kidd - 2021 - Journal of Philosophical Research 46:27-44.
    I argue that misanthropy is systematic condemnation of the moral character of humankind as it has come to be. Such condemnation can be expressed affectively and practically in a range of different ways, and the bulk of the paper sketches the four main misanthropic stances evident across the history of philosophy. Two of these, the Enemy and Fugitive stances, were named by Kant, and I call the others the Activist and Quietist. Without exhausting the range of ways of being a (...)
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