Results for 'Ian Kendrick'

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  1.  31
    Transforming Knowledge Systems for Life on Earth: Visions of Future Systems and How to Get There.Ioan Fazey, Niko Schäpke, Guido Caniglia, Anthony Hodgson, Ian Kendrick, Christopher Lyon, Glenn Page, James Patterson, Chris Riedy, Tim Strasser, Stephan Verveen, David Adams, Bruce Goldstein, Matthias Klaes, Graham Leicester, Alison Linyard, Adrienne McCurdy, Paul Ryan, Bill Sharpe, Giorgia Silvestri, Ali Yansyah Abdurrahim, David Abson, Olufemi Samson Adetunji, Paulina Aldunce, Carlos Alvarez-Pereira, Jennifer Marie Amparo, Helene Amundsen, Lakin Anderson, Lotta Andersson, Michael Asquith, Karoline Augenstein, Jack Barrie, David Bent, Julia Bentz, Arvid Bergsten, Carol Berzonsky, Olivia Bina, Kirsty Blackstock, Joanna Boehnert, Hilary Bradbury, Christine Brand, Jessica Böhme, Marianne Mille Bøjer, Esther Carmen, Lakshmi Charli-Joseph, Sarah Choudhury, Supot Chunhachoti-Ananta, Jessica Cockburn, John Colvin, Irena L. C. Connon & Rosalind Cornforth - 2020 - Energy Research and Social Science 70.
    Formalised knowledge systems, including universities and research institutes, are important for contemporary societies. They are, however, also arguably failing humanity when their impact is measured against the level of progress being made in stimulating the societal changes needed to address challenges like climate change. In this research we used a novel futures-oriented and participatory approach that asked what future envisioned knowledge systems might need to look like and how we might get there. Findings suggest that envisioned future systems will need (...)
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  2. Natural Kinds: Rosy Dawn, Scholastic Twilight: Ian Hacking.Ian Hacking - 2007 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 61:203-239.
    The rosy dawn of my title refers to that optimistic time when the logical concept of a natural kind originated in Victorian England. The scholastic twilight refers to the present state of affairs. I devote more space to dawn than twilight, because one basic problem was there from the start, and by now those origins have been forgotten. Philosophers have learned many things about classification from the tradition of natural kinds. But now it is in disarray and is unlikely to (...)
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  3. Response: Ian Barbour on Typologies.”.Ian G. Barbour - 2002 - Zygon 37:345-359.
  4. Ian Parker’s Preface to the Slovenian Edition of Slavoj Žižek: A Critical Introduction.Ian Parker - 2009 - International Journal of Žižek Studies 3 (2).
     
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  5.  3
    Deleuzism: A Metacommentary / Ian Buchanan.Ian Buchanan - 2000 - Duke University Press.
    Answers the questions “How should we read Deleuze?” and “How should we read with Deleuze?” by showing us how his philosophy works.
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  6.  52
    Sir Ian McKellen's Film Diary.Ian McKellen - 2002 - The Chesterton Review 28 (1/2):207-210.
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  7. How Changes in One's Preferences Can Affect One's Freedom : A Reply to Dowding and Van Hees: Ian Carter and Matthew H. Kramer.Ian Carter - 2008 - Economics and Philosophy 24 (1):81-96.
    How is a person's freedom related to his or her preferences? Liberal theorists of negative freedom have generally taken the view that the desire of a person to do or not do something is irrelevant to the question of whether he is free to do it. Supporters of the “pure negative” conception of freedom have advocated this view in its starkest form: they maintain that a person is unfree to Φ if and only if he is prevented from Φ-ing by (...)
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  8.  18
    Condorget: Politics and Reason: Ian White.Ian White - 1978 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 12:110-139.
    From the time of its clearest origins with Pascal, the theory of probabilities seemed to offer means by which the study of human affairs might be reduced to the same kind of mathematical discipline that was already being achieved in the study of nature. Condorcet is to a great extent merely representative of the philosophers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries who were led on by the prospect of developing moral and political sciences on the pattern of the natural sciences, (...)
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  9.  36
    Interview with Fr. Ian Boyd.Ian Boyd - 2013 - The Chesterton Review 39 (3/4):240-244.
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  10. ‘Preface To Slovene Edition’ Of Ian Parker's Slavoj Žižek: A Critical Introduction.Ian Parker - 2008 - International Journal of Žižek Studies 2 (3).
     
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  11.  90
    Physics and Astronomy: Aristotle's Physics II.2.193b22–194a12this Paper Was Prepared as the Basis of a Presentation at a Conference Entitled “Writing and Rewriting the History of Science, 1900–2000,” Les treilLes, France, September, 2003, Organized by Karine Chemla and Roshdi Rashed. I Have Compared Aristotle's and Ptolemy's Views of the Relationship Between Astronomy and Physics in a Paper Called “Astrologogeômetria and Astrophysikê in Aristotle and Ptolemy,” Presented at a Conference Entitled “Physics and Mathematics in Antiquity,” Leiden, the Netherlands, June, 2004, Organized by Keimpe Algra and Frans de Haas. For a Discussion of Hellenistic Views of This Relationship See Ian Mueller, “Remarks on Physics and Mathematical Astronomy and Optics in Epicurus, Sextus Empiricus, and Some Stoics,” in Philippa Lang , Re-Inventions: Essays on Hellenistic and Early Roman Science, Apeiron 37, 4 : 57–87. I Would Like to Thank Two Anonymous Readers of This Essay for Meticulous Corrections and Th. [REVIEW]Ian Mueller - 2006 - Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 16 (2):175-206.
    In the first part of chapter 2 of book II of the Physics Aristotle addresses the issue of the difference between mathematics and physics. In the course of his discussion he says some things about astronomy and the ‘ ‘ more physical branches of mathematics”. In this paper I discuss historical issues concerning the text, translation, and interpretation of the passage, focusing on two cruxes, the first reference to astronomy at 193b25–26 and the reference to the more physical branches at 194a7–8. In (...)
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  12.  7
    Book Review of Educational Publishing in Global Perspective: Capacity Building and Trends by Ian Montagnes. [REVIEW]Ian Montagnes - 2000 - Logos 11 (2):106-107.
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  13. A Bibliography of the Published Works [of] Ian Thomas Ramsey.Jonathan H. Pye & Ian T. Ramsey - 1979
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  14. Epistemic Injustice in Healthcare: A Philosophical Analysis.Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (4):529-540.
    In this paper we argue that ill persons are particularly vulnerable to epistemic injustice in the sense articulated by Fricker. Ill persons are vulnerable to testimonial injustice through the presumptive attribution of characteristics like cognitive unreliability and emotional instability that downgrade the credibility of their testimonies. Ill persons are also vulnerable to hermeneutical injustice because many aspects of the experience of illness are difficult to understand and communicate and this often owes to gaps in collective hermeneutical resources. We then argue (...)
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  15.  9
    Perception and Reality: A History From Descartes to Kant.Nancy Kendrick & John W. Yolton - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (2):332.
    This book does several things, and it does them all well. Yolton firmly contextualizes the debates about perception within the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, while showing how these debates are often repeated in contemporary philosophy of mind. Along the way, he provides novel interpretations of Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant that are clearly and convincingly presented. Perhaps the most important feature of his treatment is that it so vividly shows the Moderns grappling with issues about perception that continue to (...)
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  16.  41
    The Edge of Enlightenment: Ireland and Scotland in the Eighteenth Century: Ian McBride.Ian Mcbride - 2013 - Modern Intellectual History 10 (1):135-151.
    Was there an Enlightenment in Ireland? Was there even a distinctively Irish Enlightenment? Few scholars have bothered even to pose this question. Historians of Ireland during the era of Protestant Ascendancy have tended to be all-rounders rather than specialists; their traditional preoccupations are constitutional clashes between London and Dublin, religious conflict, agrarian unrest and popular politicization. With few exceptions there has been no tradition of intellectual history, and little interest in the methodological debates associated with the rise of the “Cambridge (...)
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  17.  7
    The Boundary Stones of Thought: An Essay in the Philosophy of Logic.Ian Rumfitt - 2015 - Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
    Classical logic has been attacked by adherents of rival, anti-realist logical systems: Ian Rumfitt comes to its defence. He considers the nature of logic, and how to arbitrate between different logics. He argues that classical logic may dispense with the principle of bivalence, and may thus be liberated from the dead hand of classical semantics.
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  18.  27
    Psycho-Analysis, Human Nature and Human Conduct: Ian Gregory.Ian Gregory - 1974 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 8:99-120.
    There is, I gloomily suspect, little which is significantly new that remain to be said about psycho-analysis by philosophers. The almost profligate theorising that goes on within the psycho-analytic journals will, no doubt, continue unabated. It simply strikes me as unlikely that such theorising will generate further issues of the kind that excite the philosophical mind. Though in making such an observation, I recognise that I lay claim upon the future in a manner that many might believe to be unwise. (...)
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  19. 19 Language, Truth and Reason Ian Hacking.Ian Hacking - 1998 - In Alcoff Linda (ed.), Epistemology: The Big Questions. Blackwell. pp. 322.
     
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  20.  54
    Vision Verbs Dominate in Conversation Across Cultures, but the Ranking of Non-Visual Verbs Varies.Lila San Roque, Kobin H. Kendrick, Elisabeth Norcliffe, Penelope Brown, Rebecca Defina, Mark Dingemanse, Tyko Dirksmeyer, N. J. Enfield, Simeon Floyd, Jeremy Hammond, Giovanni Rossi, Sylvia Tufvesson, Saskia van Putten & Asifa Majid - 2015 - Cognitive Linguistics 26 (1):31-60.
    To what extent does perceptual language reflect universals of experience and cognition, and to what extent is it shaped by particular cultural preoccupations? This paper investigates the universality~relativity of perceptual language by examining the use of basic perception terms in spontaneous conversation across 13 diverse languages and cultures. We analyze the frequency of perception words to test two universalist hypotheses: that sight is always a dominant sense, and that the relative ranking of the senses will be the same across different (...)
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  21. Religions and Comparative Thought: Essays in Honour of the Late Dr. Ian Kesarcodi-Watson.Ian Kesarcodi-Watson, Puruṣottama Bilimoria & Peter G. Fenner (eds.) - 1988 - Sri Satguru Publications.
  22.  63
    Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics.Ian Hacking - 1985 - Journal of Philosophy 82 (5):273-277.
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  23. World Philosophy Essay-Reviews of 225 Major Works /Edited by Frank N. Magill ; Associate Editor, Ian P. Mcgreal. --. --.Frank Northen Magill & Ian Philip Mcgreal - 1982 - Salem Press, C1982.
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  24. Equal Opportunity and Newcomb’s Problem.Ian Wells - 2019 - Mind 128 (510):429-457.
    The 'Why ain'cha rich?' argument for one-boxing in Newcomb's problem allegedly vindicates evidential decision theory and undermines causal decision theory. But there is a good response to the argument on behalf of causal decision theory. I develop this response. Then I pose a new problem and use it to give a new 'Why ain'cha rich?' argument. Unlike the old argument, the new argument targets evidential decision theory. And unlike the old argument, the new argument is sound.
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  25.  8
    Universal Meaning Extensions of Perception Verbs Are Grounded in Interaction.Lila San Roque, Kobin H. Kendrick, Elisabeth Norcliffe & Asifa Majid - 2018 - Cognitive Linguistics 29 (3):371-406.
    Apart from references to perception, words such as see and listen have shared, non-literal meanings across diverse languages. Such cross-linguistic meanings have not been systematically investigated as they appear in their natural home — informal spoken interaction. We present a qualitative examination of the semantic associations of perception verbs based on recorded everyday conversation in thirteen diverse languages. Across these diverse communities, spontaneous interaction provides evidence for two commonly-discussed extensions of perception verbs — perception~cognition, hearing~linguistic communication — as well as (...)
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  26. On Ian Hacking’s Notion of Style of Reasoning.Luca Sciortino - 2017 - Erkenntnis 82 (2):243-264.
    The analytical notion of ‘scientific style of reasoning’, introduced by Ian Hacking in the middle of the 1980s, has become widespread in the literature of the history and philosophy of science. However, scholars have rarely made explicit the philosophical assumptions and the research objectives underlying the notion of style: what are its philosophical roots? How does the notion of style fit into the area of research of historical epistemology? What does a comparison between Hacking’s project on styles of thinking and (...)
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  27. The Problem of the Basing Relation.Ian Evans - 2013 - Synthese 190 (14):2943-2957.
    In days past, epistemologists expended a good deal of effort trying to analyze the basing relation—the relation between a belief and its basis. No satisfying account was offered, and the project was largely abandoned. Younger epistemologists, however, have begun to yearn for an adequate theory of basing. I aim to deliver one. After establishing some data and arguing that traditional accounts of basing are unsatisfying, I introduce a novel theory of the basing relation: the dispositional theory. It begins with the (...)
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  28. Perception and Iconic Memory: What Sperling Doesn't Show.Ian B. Phillips - 2011 - Mind and Language 26 (4):381-411.
    Philosophers have lately seized upon Sperling's partial report technique and subsequent work on iconic memory in support of controversial claims about perceptual experience, in particular that phenomenology overflows cognitive access. Drawing on mounting evidence concerning postdictive perception, I offer an interpretation of Sperling's data in terms of cue-sensitive experience which fails to support any such claims. Arguments for overflow based on change-detection paradigms (e.g. Landman et al., 2003; Sligte et al., 2008) cannot be blocked in this way. However, such paradigms (...)
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  29. Unconscious Perception Reconsidered.Ian Phillips - 2018 - Analytic Philosophy 59 (4):471-514.
    Most contemporary theorists regard the traditional thesis that perception is essentially conscious as just another armchair edict to be abandoned in the wake of empirical discovery. Here I reconsider this dramatic departure from tradition. My aim is not to recapture our prelapsarian confidence that perception is inevitably conscious (though much I say might be recruited to that cause). Instead, I want to problematize the now ubiquitous belief in unconscious perception. The paper divides into two parts. Part One is more purely (...)
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  30.  30
    Faith and Reason: Reflections on Macintyre's ‘Tradition-Constituted Enquiry’: Ian Markham.Ian Markham - 1991 - Religious Studies 27 (2):259-267.
    The problem at the heart of the faith/reason relationship can be set out as follows. Faith implies total commitment whilst reason requires a certain detachment. One cannot be totally committed yet rationally detached at the same time. Therefore faith and reason are two mutually exclusive approaches to religion. Alasdair MacIntyre in Whose Justice? Which Rationality? has offered a very interesting perspective on this problem. He has argued, albeit indirectly, that this faith/reason question is a modern problem generated by a certain (...)
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  31.  9
    Kendrick Oliver. To Touch the Face of God: The Sacred, the Profane, and the American Space Program, 1957–1975. Xiii + 229 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013. $39.95. [REVIEW]James Spiller - 2013 - Isis 104 (4):871-872.
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  32.  3
    Can I Die?–An Essay in Religious Philosophy: Ian Kesarcodi-Watson.Ian Kesarcodi-Watson - 1980 - Religious Studies 16 (2):163-178.
    Often we feel there is something odd about death, and especially about our own. This latter at least we often feel beyond our ken. Well, I think in a sense it may be; but in another, clearly is not. Among those who have felt this strangeness is Ramchandra Gandhi who, in an excellent recent work, The Availability of Religious Ideas , maintained – There is no difficulty in seeing that I cannot intelligibly conceive of my own death – the ceasing (...)
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  33.  21
    The Mozi: A Complete Translation.Ian Johnston (ed.) - 2010 - Columbia University Press.
    The _Mozi_ is a key philosophical work written by a major social and political thinker of the fifth century B.C.E. It is one of the few texts to survive the Warring States period and is crucial to understanding the origins of Chinese philosophy and two other foundational works, the _Mengzi_ and the _Xunzi_. Ian Johnston provides an English translation of the entire _Mozi_, as well as the first bilingual edition in any European language to be published in the West. His (...)
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  34.  69
    Review of H Ow Experiments End.Ian Hacking - 1990 - Journal of Philosophy 87 (2):103-106.
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  35.  5
    A Measure of Freedom.Ian Carter (ed.) - 1999 - Oxford University Press UK.
    It is often said that one person or society is `freer' than another, or that people have a right to equal freedom, or that freedom should be increased or even maximized. Such quantitative claims about freedom are of great importance to us, forming an essential part of our political discourse and theorizing. Yet their meaning has been surprisingly neglected by political philosophers until now. Ian Carter provides the first systematic account of the nature and importance of our judgements about degrees (...)
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  36. Consciousness and Criterion: On Block's Case for Unconscious Seeing.Ian Phillips - 2016 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 93 (2):419-451.
    Block () highlights two experimental studies of neglect patients which, he contends, provide ‘dramatic evidence’ for unconscious seeing. In Block's hands this is the highly non-trivial thesis that seeing of the same fundamental kind as ordinary conscious seeing can occur outside of phenomenal consciousness. Block's case for it provides an excellent opportunity to consider a large body of research on clinical syndromes widely held to evidence unconscious perception. I begin by considering in detail the two studies of neglect to which (...)
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  37.  23
    Perception and Reality: A History From Descartes to Kant.Nancy Kendrick - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (2):332-334.
    This book does several things, and it does them all well. Yolton firmly contextualizes the debates about perception within the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, while showing how these debates are often repeated in contemporary philosophy of mind. Along the way, he provides novel interpretations of Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant that are clearly and convincingly presented. Perhaps the most important feature of his treatment is that it so vividly shows the Moderns grappling with issues about perception that continue to (...)
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  38. The Intrinsic Value of Endangered Species.Ian A. Smith - 2016 - Routledge.
    Why save endangered species without clear aesthetic, economic, or ecosystemic value? This book takes on this challenging question through an account of the intrinsic goods of species. Ian A. Smith argues that a species’ intrinsic value stems from its ability to flourish—its organisms continuing to reproduce successfully and it avoiding extinction—which helps to demonstrate a further claim, that humans ought to preserve species that we have endangered. He shows our need to exercise humility in our relations with endangered species through (...)
     
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  39.  1
    Democratic Justice.Ian Shapiro - 1999 - Yale University Press.
    Democracy and justice are often mutually antagonistic ideas, but in this innovative book Ian Shapiro shows how and why they should be pursued together. Justice must be sought democratically if it is to garner legitimacy in the modern world, he claims, and democracy must be justice-promoting if it is to sustain allegiance over time. _Democratic Justice_ meets these criteria, offering an attractive vision of a practical path to a better future. Wherever power is exercised in human affairs, Shapiro argues, the (...)
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  40. Perceiving Temporal Properties.Ian Phillips - 2010 - European Journal of Philosophy 18 (2):176-202.
    Philosophers have long struggled to understand our perceptual experience of temporal properties such as succession, persistence and change. Indeed, strikingly, a number have felt compelled to deny that we enjoy such experience. Philosophical puzzlement arises as a consequence of assuming that, if one experiences succession or temporal structure at all, then one experiences it at a moment. The two leading types of theory of temporal awareness—specious present theories and memory theories—are best understood as attempts to explain how temporal awareness is (...)
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  41.  69
    Blindsight is Qualitatively Degraded Conscious Vision.Ian Phillips - 2021 - Psychological Review 128 (3):558-584.
  42. Were Experiments Ever Neglected? Ian Hacking and the History of Philosophy of Experiment.Massimiliano Simons & Matteo Vagelli - 2021 - Philosophical Inquiries 9 (1):167-188.
    Ian Hacking’s Representing and Intervening is often credited as being one of the first works to focus on the role of experimentation in philosophy of science, catalyzing a movement which is sometimes called the “philosophy of experiment” or “new experimentalism”. In the 1980s, a number of other movements and scholars also began focusing on the role of experimentation and instruments in science. Philosophical study of experimentation has thus seemed to be an invention of the 1980s whose central figure is Hacking. (...)
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  43. Pathophobia, Illness, and Vices.Ian James Kidd - 2019 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 27 (2):286-306.
    I introduce the concept pathophobia, to capture the range of morally objectionable forms of treatment to which somatically ill persons are subjected. After distinguishing this concept from sanism and ableism, I argue that the moral wrongs of pathophobia are best analysed using a framework of vice ethics. To that end I describe five clusters of pathophobic vices and failings, illustrating each with examples from three influential illness narratives.
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  44. Carl Sagan's Last Q&a on Science and Skeptical Inquiry.Kendrick Frazier - 2009 - In Science Under Siege: Defending Science, Exposing Pseudoscience. Prometheus. pp. 48.
     
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  45.  25
    The Intersection of Turn-Taking and Repair: The Timing of Other-Initiations of Repair in Conversation.Kobin H. Kendrick - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  46. Armstrong's Analysis of Self-Awareness.Kendrick W. Walker - 1976 - Personalist 57 (4):395-402.
     
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  47. Armstrong's Analysis of Self-Awareness. [REVIEW]Kendrick W. Walker - 1976 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 57 (4):395.
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  48.  45
    Mary Astell’s Theory of Spiritual Friendship.Nancy Kendrick - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (1):46-65.
    Mary Astell’s theory of friendship has been interpreted either as a version of Aristotelian virtue friendship, or as aligned with a Christian and Platonist tradition. In this paper, I argue that Astell’s theory of friendship is determinedly anti-Aristotelian; it is a theory of spiritual friendship offered as an alternative to Aristotelian virtue friendship. By grounding her conception of friendship in a Christian–Platonist metaphysics, I show that Astell rejects the Aristotelian criteria of reciprocity and partiality as essential features of the friendship (...)
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  49. Skeptical Theism and Empirical Unfalsifiability.Ian Wilks - 2009 - Faith and Philosophy 26 (1):64-76.
    Arguments strong enough to justify skeptical theism will be strong enough to justify the position that every claim about God is empirically unfalsifiable. This fact is problematic because that position licenses further arguments which are clearly unreasonable, but which the skeptical theist cannot consistently accept as such. Avoiding this result while still achieving the theoretical objectives looked for in skeptical theism appears to demand an impossibly nuanced position.
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  50.  90
    No Watershed for Overflow: Recent Work on the Richness of Consciousness.Ian Phillips - 2016 - Philosophical Psychology 29 (2):236-249.
    A familiar and enduring controversy surrounds the question of whether our phenomenal experience “overflows” availability to cognition: do we consciously see more than we can remember and report? Both sides to this debate have long sought to move beyond naïve appeals to introspection by providing empirical evidence for or against overflow. Recently, two notable studies—Bronfman, Brezis, Jacobson, and Usher and Vandenbroucke, Sligte, Fahrenfort, Ambroziak, and Lamme —have purported to provide compelling evidence in favor of overflow. Here I explain why the (...)
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