Results for 'I. I. I. Holmes Rolston'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Terrestrial and extraterrestrial altruism.I. I. I. Holmes Rolston - 2014 - In Douglas A. Vakoch (ed.), Extraterrestrial altruism: evolution and ethics in the cosmos. New York: Springer.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  25
    Environmental Ethics: An Anthology.Andrew Light & I. I. I. Holmes Rolston (eds.) - 2002 - Wiley.
    Environmental Ethics: An Anthology brings together both classic and cutting-edge essays which have formed contemporary environmental ethics, ranging from the welfare of animals versus ecosystems to theories of the intrinsic value of nature.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3. by Holmes Rolston III.I. I. I. Rolston - unknown
    Both science and ethics are embedded in cultural traditions where truths are shared through education; both need competent critics educated within such traditions. Education in both ought to be directed although moral education demands levels of responsible agency that science education does not. Evolutionary science often carries an implicit or explicit understanding of who and what humans are, one which may not be coherent with the implicit or explicit human self-understanding in moral education.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Converging versus reconstituting environmental ethics.I. I. I. Holmes Rolston - 2009 - In Ben Minteer (ed.), Nature in Common?: Environmental Ethics and the Contested Foundations of Environmental Policy. Temple University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Human uniqueness and human dignity : persons in nature and the nature of persons.I. I. I. Holmes Rolston - 2008 - In Adam Schulman (ed.), Human Dignity and Bioethics: Essays Commissioned by the President's Council on Bioethics. [President's Council on Bioethics.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Religion ant) science.David Pailin John Polkinghorne, Holmes Rolston I. I. I. Steven Bouma-Prediger & L. Charles Birch Kenneth Cauthen - forthcoming - Zygon.
  7.  25
    Valuing wildlands.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1985 - Environmental Ethics 7 (1):23-48.
    Valuing wildlands is complex. (1) In a philosophically oriented analysis, I distinguish seven meaning levels of value, individual preference, market price, individual good, social preference, social good, organismic, and ecosystemic, and itemize twelve types of value carried by wildlands, economic, life support, recreational, scientific, genetic diversity, aesthetic, cultural syrubolization, historical, characterbuilding, therapeutic, religious, and intrinsic. (2) I criticize contingent valuation efforts to price these values. (3) I then propose an axiological model, which interrelates the multiple levels and types of value, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8. Valuing Wildlands.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1985 - Environmental Ethics 7 (1):23-48.
    Valuing wildlands is complex. In a philosophically oriented analysis, I distinguish seven meaning levels of value, individual preference, market price, individual good, social preference, social good, organismic, and ecosystemic, and itemize twelve types of value carried by wildlands, economic, life support, recreational, scientific, genetic diversity, aesthetic, cultural syrubolization, historical, characterbuilding, therapeutic, religious, and intrinsic. I criticize contingent valuation efforts to price these values. I then propose an axiological model, which interrelates the multiple levels and types of value, and some principles (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. The Science and Religion Dialogue.Holmes Rolston Iii - 2006 - In Fraser Watts & Kevin Dutton (eds.), Why the Science and Religion Dialogue Matters: Voices from the International Society for Science and Religion. Templeton Foundation Press.
    are the two most important things in the world. A student promptly objected: "No, Professor, you are wrong. that's sex and money." I convinced him otherwise by the time the semester was over. But I am still trying to convince most of the world- Science is the firss Iact of modern life, and religion is the perennial carrier of meaning. Seen in depth and in terms of their long-range personal and cultural impacts, science and religion are the two most important (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  66
    Value in Nature and the Nature of Value.Holmes Rolston - 1994 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 36:13-30.
    I offer myself as a nature guide, exploring for values. Many before us have got lost and we must look the world over. The unexamined life is not worth living; life in an unexamined world is not worthy living either. We miss too much of value.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  11.  58
    Value in Nature and the Nature of Value.Holmes Rolston - 1994 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 36:13-30.
    I offer myself as a nature guide, exploring for values. Many before us have got lost and we must look the world over. The unexamined life is not worth living; life in an unexamined world is not worthy living either. We miss too much of value.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  12.  19
    Lame Science? Blind Religion?Holmes Rolston - 2019 - Zygon 54 (2):351-353.
    In Consecrating Science, Lisa Sideris argues that an anthropocentric and science‐based cosmology encourages human arrogance and diminishes a sense of wonder in human experience immersed in the natural world, as found in diverse cultural and religious traditions. I agree with her that science elevated to a commanding worldview, scientism, is a common and contemporary mistake, to be deplored, a lame science. But I further argue that science has introduced us to the marvels of deep nature and vastly increased our human (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13. I & II Thessalonians, Timothy, Titus, and Philemon.Holmes Rolston - 1963
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Preaching on the Environment.Holmes Rolston - unknown
    covenant. " Behold I establish my covenant with you and your descendants after you, and with every living creature that is with you, the birds, the cattle, and every beast of the earth with you ". In modern terms, the covenant was both ecumenical and ecological. However, the ecological dimension is usually forgotten ; recalling it is worth a sermon.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Creation and Resurrection.Holmes Rolston - unknown
    staggering fact; life renewed after death would be continuing miracle, but, just that: continuing miracle. My friends puzzle over my claim. "Well, I hadn't thought of it like that. You could be right. I agree that creation, or nature is surprising. Still, science leads us to think that nature is all there is. Resurrection is supernatural, and.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Preaching on the Wonder of Creation.Holmes Rolston - unknown
    A sermon on the wonders of creation? "But I don't know if I believe in creation any more, since I've been studying evolution in school," "Well, you do still think that Earth is a wonderland, don't you? Is there anything you have learned in your biology class that has talked you out of that?" The college student home for Easter puzzles a moment. "Not really. You know, I was wondering during the last lecture before I left. Wow! How is it (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  35
    Is there an ecological ethic?I. I. I. Rolston - 1975 - Ethics 85 (2):93-109.
  18.  29
    Values gone wild.I. I. I. Rolston - 1983 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 26 (2):181 – 207.
    Wilderness valued as mere resource for human?interest satisfaction is challenged in favor of wilderness as a productive source, in which humans have roots, but which also yields wild neighbors and aliens with intrinsic value. Wild value is storied achievement in an evolutionary ecosystem, with instrumental and intrinsic, organismic and systemic values intermeshed. Survival value is reconsidered in this light. Changing cultural appreciations of values in wilderness can transform and relativize our judgments about appropriate conduct there. A final valued element in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  19. Human uniqueness and human dignity : persons in nature and the nature of persons.I. I. I. Rolston - 2008 - In Adam Schulman (ed.), Human Dignity and Bioethics: Essays Commissioned by the President's Council on Bioethics. [President's Council on Bioethics.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20. Human Uniqueness and Human Responsibility.I. I. I. Rolston - unknown
    On the scale of decades and centuries, ongoingscience is reconfigured into human history that must be interpreted. So I concluded two decades back: "Progressively reforming and developing theories are erected over observations.... This leads at a larger scale to progressively reforming and developing narrative models.... The story is ever reforming" (pp. 338 — 39). I faced the future with hopes and fears about the escalating powers of science for good and evil, finding it simultaneously powerless for the meaningful guidance of (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Chapter 9.I. I. I. Rolston - unknown
    Few discussions of environmental conservation continue long without reaching the question "Why?", and the answers are seldom elaborated for long without reaching the question of values. What we wish to conserve depends on what we value. What we ought to conserve depends on what we ought to value. Environmental ethics is entwined with values carried by nature. What is of value there? How are values to be discovered and judged? That is a philosophical question.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Converging versus reconstituting environmental ethics.I. I. I. Rolston - 2009 - In Ben Minteer (ed.), Nature in Common?: Environmental Ethics and the Contested Foundations of Environmental Policy. Temple University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  10
    Ecological spirituality.I. I. I. Rolston - 1997 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 18 (1):59 - 64.
  24. From Biological to Religious Evolution.I. I. I. Rolston - unknown
    The focus immediately shifted to cognitive psychology, to the cybernetic brain, with its neural genius for mental (or "spirited") experience. The ideational powers of the..
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  6
    F/Actual Knowing: Putting Facts and Values in Place.I. I. I. Rolston - 2005 - Ethics and the Environment 10 (2):137 - 174.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  50
    SuperCooperators: Altruism, Evolution, and Why We Need Each Other to Succeed by Martin A. Nowak, with Roger Highfield.I. I. I. Rolston - 2011 - Zygon 46 (4):1003-1005.
  27.  15
    Saving Nature, Feeding People, and the Foundations of Ethics.Holmes Rolston Iii - 1998 - Environmental Values 7 (3):349 - 357.
    Invited response by Holmes Rolston, III, to the previous three articles in this issue of Environmental Values.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28.  44
    Caring for Nature: What Science and Economics Can't Teach Us but Religion Can.Holmes Rolston Iii - 2006 - Environmental Values 15 (3):307 - 313.
    Neither ecologists nor economists can teach us what we most need to know about nature: how to value it. The Hebrew prophets claimed that there can be no intelligent human ecology except as people learn to use land justly and charitably. Lands do not flow with milk and honey for all unless and until justice rolls down like waters. What kind of planet ought we humans wish to have? One we resourcefully manage for our benefits? Or one we hold in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  49
    Environmental Ethics and Religion/Science.Holmes Rolston Iii - 2006 - In Philip Clayton (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oxford University Press. pp. 908--928.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  10
    Nature, the Genesis of Value, and Human Understanding.Holmes Rolston Iii - 1997 - Environmental Values 6 (3):361 - 364.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  18
    SuperCooperators: Altruism, Evolution, and Why We Need Each Other to Succeed by Martin A. Nowak, with Roger Highfield.Holmes Rolston Iii - 2011 - Zygon 46 (4):1003-1005.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  28
    Technology and/or Nature: Denatured/Renatured/Engineered/Artifacted Life?Holmes Rolston Iii - 2017 - Ethics and the Environment 22 (1):41-62.
    Technology involves artifacts, both in its etymology, from the Greek tekhne, “art” or “skill,” and in its central idea, the body of knowledge available to a culture for fashioning and using implements. This has so dramatically escalated in modern times, with the coupling of science and industry, that we have entered the first century in the 45 million centuries of life on Earth in which one species can aspire to manage the planet’s future. Since Galileo, Earth seemed a minor planet, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  28
    The challenge of the new millennium.Holmes Rolston Iii - 2012 - The Philosophers' Magazine 59 (59):30-37.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  16
    The Human Standing in Nature.Holmes Rolston Iii - 1986 - Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy 8:90-101.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35.  77
    Environmental ethics: An introduction to environmental philosophy.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (2):219-224.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  36. Does aesthetic appreciation of landscapes need to be science-based?Rolston Holmes - 1995 - British Journal of Aesthetics 35 (4):374-386.
  37. Values in Nature.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1981 - Environmental Ethics 3 (2):113-128.
    Nature is examined as a carrier of values. Despite problems of subjectivity and objectivity in value assignments, values are actualized in human relationships with nature, sometimes by constructive activity depending on a natural support, sometimes by a sensitive, if an interpretive, appreciation of the characteristics of natural objects. Ten areas of values associated with nature are recognized: economic value, life support value, recreational value, scientific value, aesthetic value, life value, diversity and unity values, stability and spontaneity values, dialectical value, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  38. Are Values in Nature Subjective or Objective?Iii Holmes Rolston - 1982 - Environmental Ethics 4 (2):125-151.
    Prevailing accounts of natural values as the subjective response of the human mind are reviewed and contested. Discoveries in the physical sciences tempt us to strip the reality away from many native-range qualities, including values, but discoveries in the biological sciences counterbalance this by finding sophisticated structures and selective processes in earthen nature. On the one hand, all human knowing and valuing contain subjective components, being theory-Iaden. On the other hand, in ordinary natural affairs, in scientific knowing, and in valuing, (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  39.  24
    Can the east help the west to value nature?Iii Holmes Rolston - 1987 - Philosophy East and West 37 (2):172-190.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  40.  35
    Aesthetic experience in forests.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1998 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (2):157-166.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  41. Can and Ought We to Follow Nature?Iii Holmes Rolston - 1979 - Environmental Ethics 1 (1):7-30.
    “Nature knows best” is reconsidered from an ecological perspective which suggests that we ought to follow nature. The phrase “follow nature” has many meanings. In an absolute law-of-nature sense, persons invariably and necessarily act in accordance with natural laws, and thus cannot but follow nature. In an artifactual sense, all deliberate human conduct is viewed as unnatural, and thus it is impossible to follow nature. As a result, the answer to the question, whether we can and ought to follow nature, (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42. Environmental Ethics in Antartica.Iii Holmes Rolston - 2002 - Environmental Ethics 24 (2):115-134.
    The concerns of environmental ethics on other continents fail in Antarctica, which is without sustainable development, or ecosystems for a “land ethic,” or even familiar terrestrial fauna and flora. An Antarctic regime, developing politically, has been developing an ethics, underrunning the politics, remarkably exemplified in the Madrid Protocol, protecting “the intrinsic value of Antarctica.” Without inhabitants, claims of sovereignty are problematic. Antarctica is a continent for scientists and, more recently, tourists. Both focus on wild nature. Life is driven to extremes; (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  15
    Mountain Majesties above Fruited Plains: Culture, Nature, and Rocky Mountain Aesthetics.Iii Holmes Rolston - 2008 - Environmental Ethics 30 (1):3-20.
    Those residing in the Rocky Mountains enjoy both nature and culture in ways not characteristic of many inhabited landscapes. Landscapes elsewhere in the United States and in Europe involve a nature-culture synthesis. An original nature, once encountered by settlers, has been transformed by a dominating culture, and on the resulting landscape, there is little experience of primordial nature. On Rocky Mountain landscapes, the model is an ellipse with two foci. Much of the landscape is in synthesis, but there is much (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44. Nature and Culture In Environmental Ethics.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1999 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 1:151-158.
    The pivotal claim in environmental ethics is that humans in their cultures are out of sustainable relationships to the natural environments comprising the landscapes on which these cultures are superimposed. But bringing such culture into more intelligent relationships with the natural world requires not so much “naturalizing culture” as discriminating recognition of the radical differences between nature and culture, on the basis of which a dialectical ethic of complementarity may be possible. How far nature can and ought be managed and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Nature and Human Emotions.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1979 - Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy 1:89-96.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  19
    South African Environments into the 21st Century.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1992 - Environmental Ethics 14 (1):87-91.
  47.  8
    Schlick's responsible man.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1975 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 36 (2):261-267.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  40
    The fallacy of wildlife conservation.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1985 - Environmental Ethics 7 (2):177-180.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. The Future of Environmental Ethics.Iii Holmes Rolston - 2007 - Teaching Ethics 8 (1):1-27.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  17
    The natural environment: An annotated bibliography on attitudes and values.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1986 - Environmental Ethics 8 (1):91-93.
1 — 50 / 1000