Results for 'Human Knowledge'

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  1.  58
    Knowledge, Glory and ‘On Human Dignity'.Henri Atlan, Glory Knowledge & On Human Dignity - 2007 - Diogenes 54 (3):11-17.
    The idea of dignity seems indissociable from that of humanity, whether in its universal dimension of ‘human dignity’, or in the individual ‘dignity of the person’. This paper provides an outlook on the ethics governing the sciences and technology, in particular the biological sciences and biotechnology, and recalls the notion of ‘glory’, both human and divine, as it infuses a great part of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance cultures, just before the scientific revolution in Europe.
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  2.  52
    Appearance in this list neither guarantees nor precludes a future review of the book. Aarts, Bas, David Denison, Evelyn Keizer, and Gergana Popova (eds), Fuzzy Grammar: A Reader, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2004, pp. vii+ 526. Aronson, Ronald, Camus and Sartre: The Story of a Friendship and the Quarrel that Ended It, Chicago, Il: University of Chicago Press, 2004, pp. x+ 291,£ 23.00, $32.50. [REVIEW]Human Knowledge - 2004 - Mind 113:451.
  3.  26
    Aristotle on episteme and nous.Humanities Collegiate Division - 1998 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (1):15-46.
    On the standard interpretation, Aristotle's conception of "nous" is geared against skeptical worries about the possibility of scientific knowledge and ultimately of the knowledge of first principles. On this view, Aristotle introduces "nous" as an intuitive faculty that grasps the first principles once and for all as true in such a way that it does not leave any room for the skeptic to press his skeptical point any further. This position views Aristotelian "nous" as having an internalist justificatory (...)
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  4.  22
    Complexity: E-Special Introduction.Oliver Human - 2016 - Theory, Culture and Society 33 (7-8):421-440.
    This E-Special Issue collects together 11 articles from the archives of Theory, Culture & Society. These articles all articulate and debate the contribution of what some have described as either ‘complex complexity’ or ‘general complexity’. In contrast to reductionist or restricted attempts to understand complexity, the articles collected here move away from the tendency to assume mastery of complexity by expounding a set of universal and simple laws. Rather, the position of general complexity is that we cannot grasp the complexity (...)
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  5.  28
    Sexual abuse: A practical theological study, with an emphasis on learning from transdisciplinary research.Heidi Human & Julian C. Müller - 2015 - HTS Theological Studies 71 (3).
    This article illustrates the practical usefulness of transdisciplinary work for practical theology by showing how input from an occupational therapist informed my understanding and interpretation of the story of Hannetjie, who had been sexually abused as a child. This forms part of a narrative practical theological research project into the spirituality of female adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse. Transdisciplinary work is useful to practical theologians, as it opens possibilities for learning about matters pastors have to face, but may not (...)
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  6.  4
    Doctors, Patients, and Society: Power and Authority in Medical Care.Martin S. Staum, Donald E. Larsen, David J. Roy & Calgary Institute for the Humanities - 1981 - Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press.
    This book is a collection of papers presented at an interdisciplinary workshop at the Calgary Institute for the Humanities in May 1980. The three broad issues covered are: the physician-patient relationship, the allocation of responsibility among doctors and nurses, and the political and social framework of the health care system. The first set of essays is concerned with the moral and legal aspects of the physician-patient relationship. The link between knowledge and power is examined as well as the moral (...)
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  7. Human Knowledge: Its Scope and Limits.Bertrand Russell - 1948 - London and New York: Routledge.
    How do we know what we "know"? How did we –as individuals and as a society – come to accept certain knowledge as fact? In _Human Knowledge,_ Bertrand Russell questions the reliability of our assumptions on knowledge. This brilliant and controversial work investigates the relationship between ‘individual’ and ‘scientific’ knowledge. First published in 1948, this provocative work contributed significantly to an explosive intellectual discourse that continues to this day.
  8.  66
    Human Knowledge: Its Scope and Limits.Bertrand Russell - 1948 - New York, USA: Simon and Schuster.
    This brilliant and controversial work investigates the relationship between 'individual' and 'scientific' knowledge.
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  9. Understanding human knowledge: philosophical essays.Barry Stroud - 2000 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Since the 1970s Barry Stroud has been one of the most original contributors to the philosophical study of human knowledge. This volume presents the best of Stroud's essays in this area. Throughout, he seeks to clearly identify the question that philosophical theories of knowledge are meant to answer, and the role scepticism plays in making sense of that question. In these seminal essays, he suggests that people pursuing epistemology need to concern themselves with whether philosophical scepticism is (...)
  10. Human Knowledge, Its Scope and Limits.Bertrand Russell - 1949 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 54 (2):198-199.
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  11. Human Knowledge, Its Scope and Limits.Bertrand Russell - 1949 - Mind 58 (231):369-378.
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  12. Human knowledge and the infinite regress of reasons.Peter D. Klein - 1999 - Philosophical Perspectives 13:297-325.
  13.  13
    Human Knowledge, Its Scope and Limits.Robert Feys - 1950 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 15 (3):213-215.
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  14.  37
    Human knowledge and human nature: a new introduction to an ancient debate.Peter Carruthers - 1992 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Contemporary debates in epistemology devote much attention to the nature of knowledge, but neglect the question of its sources. This book focuses on the latter, especially on the question of innateness. Carruthers' aim is to transform and reinvigorate contemporary empiricism, while also providing an introduction to a range of issues in the theory of knowledge. He gives a lively presentation and assessment of the claims of classical empiricism, particularly its denial of substantive a priori knowledge and of (...)
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  15. Human knowledge and the infinite progress of reasoning.Peter Klein - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 134 (1):1 - 17.
    The purpose of this paper is to explain how infinitism—the view that reasons are endless and non-repeating—solves the epistemic regress problem and to defend that solution against some objections. The first step is to explain what the epistemic regress problem is and, equally important, what it is not. Second, I will discuss the foundationalist and coherentist responses to the regress problem and offer some reasons for thinking that neither response can solve the problem, no matter how they are tweaked. Then, (...)
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  16. Understanding human knowledge in general.Barry Stroud - 1989 - In Marjorie Clay & Keith Lehrer (eds.), Knowledge and Skepticism. Westview Press.
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  17.  68
    Human Knowledge and the Infinite Regress of Reasons.Peter D. Klein - 1999 - Noûs 33 (s13):297-325.
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  18.  23
    Human knowledge: classical and contemporary approaches.Paul K. Moser & Arnold Vander Nat (eds.) - 1987 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Offering a unique and wide-ranging examination of the theory of knowledge, the new edition of this comprehensive collection deftly blends readings from the foremost classical sources with the work of important contemporary philosophical thinkers. Human Knowledge: Classical and Contemporary Approaches, 3/e, offers philosophical examinations of epistemology from ancient Greek and Roman philosophy (Plato, Aristotle, Sextus Empiricus); medieval philosophy (Augustine, Aquinas); early modern philosophy (Descartes, Locke, Leibniz, Berkeley, Hume, Reid, Kant); classical pragmatism and Anglo-American empiricism (James, Russell, Ayer, (...)
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  19.  40
    Human Knowledge: Its Scope and Limits.L. J. Russell - 1949 - Philosophy 24 (90):253 - 260.
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  20. Human knowledge, animal and reflective.Ernest Sosa - 2001 - Philosophical Studies 106 (3):193 - 196.
    Stephen Grimm finds me inclined to bifurcate epistemic assessment into higher and lower orders while showing awareness of this only in recent writings. Two untoward consequences allegedly follow: (a) my rejection of Virtue Reliabilism, and (b) my knowledge-based account of the value attaching to our knowledge on the higher level. By contrast, Grimm considers Virtue Reliabilism a perfectly adequate account of knowledge, while the higher epistemic state he believes to be, rather, understanding, which he takes to be (...)
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  21. Human Knowledge and Human Nature: A New Introduction to an Ancient Debate.Peter Carruthers - 1992 - Philosophy 67 (262):567-569.
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  22. Understanding Human Knowledge in General.Barry Stroud - 2000 - In Sven Bernecker & Fred I. Dretske (eds.), Knowledge: Readings in Contemporary Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
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  23. Human Knowledge: Its Scope and Value.Bertrand Russell - 1992 - Routledge.
    Russell's classic examination of the relation between individual experience and the general body of scientific knowledge. It is a rigorous examination of the problems of an empiricist epistemology.
     
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  24. Human Knowledge: Its Scope and Value.Bertrand Russell - 1992 - Routledge.
    Russell's classic examination of the relation between individual experience and the general body of scientific knowledge. It is a rigorous examination of the problems of an empiricist epistemology.
     
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  25. Atomic physics and human knowledge.Niels Bohr - 1958 - New York,: Wiley.
    These articles and speeches by the Nobel Prize-winning physicist date from 1934 to 1958. Rather than expositions on quantum physics, the papers are philosophical in nature, exploring the relevance of atomic physics to many areas of human endeavor. Includes an essay in which Bohr and Einstein discuss quantum and_wave equation theories. 1961 edition.
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  26.  35
    Human Knowledge: Classical and Contemporary Approaches.Paul K. Moser & Arnold Vander Nat (eds.) - 1995 - New York: Oxford University Press USA.
    Offering a unique and wide-ranging examination of the theory of knowledge, the new edition of this comprehensive collection deftly blends readings from the foremost classical sources with the work of important contemporary philosophical thinkers. Human Knowledge: Classical and Contemporary Approaches, 3/e, offers philosophical examinations of epistemology from ancient Greek and Roman philosophy ; medieval philosophy ; early modern philosophy ; classical pragmatism and Anglo-American empiricism ; and other influential Anglo-American philosophers. Organized chronologically and thematically, Human (...), 3/e, features exceptionally broad coverage and nontechnical selections that are easily accessible to students. An ideal text for both undergraduate and graduate courses in epistemology, it is enhanced by the editors' substantial general introduction, section overviews, and up-to-date bibliographies. The third edition offers expanded selections on contemporary epistemology and adds selections by Thomas Reid, Richard Rorty, David B. Annis, Richard Feldman and Earl Conee, Ernest Sosa, Barry Stroud, and Louise M. Antony. Human Knowledge, 3/e, offers an unparalleled introduction to our ancient struggle to understand our own intellectual experience. (shrink)
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  27.  63
    Mature Human Knowledge as a Standing in the Space of Reasons.Ram Neta - 2009 - Philosophical Topics 37 (1):115-132.
    This quoted passage makes a negative claim – a claim about what we are not doing when we characterize an episode or state as that of knowing – and it also makes a positive claim – a claim about what we are doing when we characterize an episode or state as that of knowing. Although McDowell has not endorsed the negative claim, he has repeatedly and explicitly endorsed the positive claim, i.e., that “in characterizing an episode or a state as (...)
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  28.  47
    Human knowledge/human knowers: Comments on Michael Williams' “what's so special about human knowledge?”.Jeremy Fantl - 2015 - Episteme 12 (2):269-273.
    In Michael Williams' “What's So Special About Human knowledge?” he argues that the kind of knowledge characteristic of adult humans is distinctive in that it involves epistemic responsibility. In particular, when an adult human has knowledge, they have a certain kind of epistemic authority, and that to attribute knowledge to them is to grant them a certain kind of authority over the subject matter. I argue that, while it is true that when we attribute (...)
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  29.  40
    Understanding Human Knowledge Philosophically.Michael Williams - 1996 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (2):359 - 378.
    Hume thinks that scepticism is “a malady, which can never be radically cur’d.” By this he means that scepticism is theoretically unassailable. Thus.
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  30.  30
    Methodologies for studying human knowledge.John R. Anderson - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (3):467-477.
    The appropriate methodology for psychological research depends on whether one is studying mental algorithms or their implementation. Mental algorithms are abstract specifications of the steps taken by procedures that run in the mind. Implementational issues concern the speed and reliability of these procedures. The algorithmic level can be explored only by studying across-task variation. This contrasts with psychology's dominant methodology of looking for within-task generalities, which is appropriate only for studying implementational issues.The implementation-algorithm distinction is related to a number of (...)
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  31.  22
    Principles of human knowledge and Three dialogues.George Berkeley (ed.) - 1988 [1710] - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Berkeley's idealism started a revolution in philosophy. As one of the great empiricist thinkers he not only influenced British philosophers from Hume to Russell and the logical positivists in the twentieth century, he also set the scene for the continental idealism of Hegel and even the philosophy of Marx. -/- There has never been such a radical critique of common sense and perception as that given in Berkeley's Principles of Human Knowledge (1710). His views were met with disfavour, (...)
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  32. Galileo, Human Knowledge, and the Book of Nature. Method Replaces Metaphysics.J. Pitt - 1995 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 57 (2):359-360.
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  33. Human knowledge.Martin Pickavé - 2011 - In Brian Davies & Eleonore Stump (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Aquinas. Oxford University Press.
  34.  9
    Human Knowledge—Its Scope and Limits.L. J. Russell - 1949 - Philosophy 24 (90):253-260.
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  35.  63
    Human Knowledge and Human Nature: A New Introduction to an Ancient Debate.Fiona Cowie & Peter Carruthers - 1996 - Philosophical Review 105 (4):530.
    Based on lectures developed for an audience ignorant of analytic thought, Carruthers’s clearly and elegantly written book introduces many central issues in modern philosophy, including knowledge, justification, truth, the a priori, Platonism, learning, the evolution of mind, explanation. Its organizing principle being the rationalist-empiricist controversy from the 1700s onwards, it also offers an intriguing reinterpretation of that debate and mounts a lively defense of a hybrid position that eschews the a priori while allowing the existence of innate mental structure. (...)
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  36. Human knowledge: a classic statement of logical empiricism.Eino Kaila - 2014 - Chicago, Illinois: Open Court. Edited by Juha Manninen.
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  37.  16
    Human Knowledge, What it is and What it is Not.Eino Kaila & G. H. von Wright - 1942 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 7 (1):43-44.
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  38.  8
    Human Knowledge: Classical and Contemporary Approaches.Paul K. Moser, Arnold Vander Nat & Hilary Kornblith - 1998 - Philosophical Quarterly 48 (192):425-426.
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  39. Principles of Human Knowledge: And, Three Dialogues.George Berkeley - 1988 - Oxford: Oxford University Press. Edited by Howard Robinson & George Berkeley.
    Berkeley's idealism started a revolution in philosophy. As one of the great empiricist thinkers he not only influenced British philosphers from Hume to Russell and the logical positivists in the twentieth-century, he also set the scene for the continental idealism of Hegel and even the philosophy of Marx. This edition of Berkeley's two key works has an introduction which examines and in part defends his arguments for idealism, as well as offering a detailed analytical contents list, extensive philosophical notes, and (...)
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  40. Human Knowledge: Its Scope and Limits Vol. 24.Bertrand Russell - 2009 - Routledge.
    First published in 1948, this provocative work contributed significantly to an explosive intellectual discourse that continues to this day.
     
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  41. Human Knowledge.Wesley C. Salmon - 1974 - Duckworth.
     
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  42.  33
    Human Knowledge of Material and Spiritual Existence.Elizabeth Salmon - 1961 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 35:179-186.
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  43.  3
    Human Knowledge of Material and Spiritual Existence.Elizabeth Salmon - 1961 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 35:179-186.
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  44. Problem : Human Knowledge of Material and Spiritual Existence.Elizabeth Salmon - 1961 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 35:179.
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  45. Beyond human knowledge.Rudolf Von Urban - 1958 - London,: Rider.
  46.  65
    On Human Knowledge.Jacques Maritain - 1949 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 24 (2):225-243.
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  47.  8
    Human Knowledge and Human Nature. An Introduction to an Ancient Debate.Jim Edwards - 1993 - Philosophical Books 34 (2):106-108.
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  48.  12
    Human Knowledge from Pen to Print.Ned S. Garvin - 1993 - Russell: The Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies 13 (1):87.
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  49.  88
    Non-human knowledge and non-human agency.Hans Johann Https://Orcidorg909X Glock - 2012 - In .
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  50. Human Knowledge and “As-If” Knowledge of Ideal Observers.K. Pavlov-Pinus - 2015 - Constructivist Foundations 10 (2):239-240.
    Open peer commentary on the article “What Can the Global Observer Know?” by Diana Gasparyan. Upshot: My comments are aimed at certain difficulties and ambivalent statements in Gasparyan’s paper that are necessary to clarify before any productive discussion can start. Particularly, the underlying problem of her research should be made more explicit and internal differentiation of various research contexts should be more precise.
     
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