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  1.  40
    Board Members, Corporate Social Responsiveness and Profitability: Are Tradeoffs Necessary? [REVIEW]Hugh M. O'Neill, Charles B. Saunders & Anne Derwinski McCarthy - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (5):353 - 357.
    The relationship between corporate social responsiveness and profitability is investigated in a sample of corporate directors. The findings show there is no relationship between the level of director social responsiveness and corporate profitability. The implications of these results are discussed, especially as they relate to concerns about corporate governance.
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  2.  23
    Predicting Corporate Social Responsiveness: A Model Drawn From Three Perspectives. [REVIEW]Barbara Beliveau, Melville Cottrill & Hugh M. O'Neill - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (9):731 - 738.
    Most studies of corporate social responsiveness (CSR) focus on the relationship between CSR and profit. Here, we use three perspectives (institutional theory, economic theory and agency theory) to explain CSR. Industry norms, market share and indicators of management reputation predict variance in CSR. The combined perspectives improve understanding of both CSR and the CSR-profit relationship in two ways. First, they suggest that CSR levels and their relationship with profit will vary by industry. Second, they suggest that stock market measures and (...)
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  3.  19
    Alienation in Corporate America: Fact or Fable? [REVIEW]Charles B. Saunders, Hugh M. O'Neill & Oscar W. Jensen - 1986 - Journal of Business Ethics 5 (4):285-289.
    Using NORC annual survey data, the authors selected 21 questions describing respondent attitudes toward job, life in general, and financial status. Respondents were catigorized as management, white collar, blue collar, and those not affiliated with business organizations. Attitudes were compared across the four occupational groups. Little dissatisfaction was found in any but the blue collar group. Management as a group, and men as well as women managers showed high levels of satisfaction, with few significant differences found in responses by men (...)
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