Results for 'How Maya Women Respond To Changing'

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  1.  17
    How Maya Women Respond to Changing Technology.Karen L. Kramer & Garnett P. McMillan - 1998 - Human Nature 9 (2):205-223.
    In the mid 1970s labor-saving technology was introduced into a Maya subsistence agricultural community that markedly increased the efficiency with which maize could be ground and water collected. This increased efficiency introduces a possible savings in the time that women allocate to work, which can be reapportioned to child care, food production, domestic work, or leisure. An earlier study suggested that this labor-saving technology had a positive effect in decreasing the age at which these Maya women (...)
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  2. An Interdisciplinary Biosocial Perspective.Participation on Ifaluk Atoll & How Maya Women Respond To Changing - 1998 - Human Nature: An Interdisciplinary Biosocial Perspective 9:95.
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  3.  10
    Power Changes How the Brain Responds to Others.Jeremy Hogeveen, Michael Inzlicht & Sukhvinder S. Obhi - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (2):755-762.
  4.  1
    Pedagogical Responses to the Changing Position of Girls and Young Women.Carrie Paechter, Rosalyn George & Angela McRobbie (eds.) - 2016 - Routledge.
    Academics and professionals working with young women face a series of paradoxes. Over the last 20 years, the lives of young women in the UK and Europe have been transformed. They have gained considerable freedom and independence, but at the very same time, new, less tangible forms of constraint and subordination now play a defining role in the formation of their everyday subjectivities and identities. Young women have come to exemplify the pervasive sensibility of self-responsibility and self-organisation. (...)
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  5.  5
    How Should We Respond to Climate Change? Virtue Ethics and Aggregation Problems.Dominic Lenzi - forthcoming - Journal of Social Philosophy.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  6.  38
    How Did Islam Contribute to Change the Legal Status of Women: The Case of the Jawari or the Female Slaves.Khalil Athamina - 2007 - Al-Qantara 28 (2):383-408.
    Este artículo analiza los cambios que se produjeron en el estatus legal de las esclavas (yawari) con la introducción y expansión del islam entre los árabes. El autor analiza tanto las causas religiosas como las debidas a factores históricos y sociales: cambio en los criterios del reparto del botín de guerra, en el trato y uso de las prisioneras de guerra, introducción del concepto de umm al-walad, etc. Igualmente, se estudia la repercusión social que tuvieron estos cambios para las esclavas (...)
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  7.  9
    Metaphysical Animals: How Four Women Brought Philosophy Back to Life.Clare Mac Cumhaill & Rachael Wiseman - 2022 - London, UK: Chatto and Windus.
    'Philosophy in a world of women. I reflected, talking with Mary, Pip and Elizabeth, how much I love them.' Two brilliant young scholars uncover the major philosophical contributions of four women whose ideas could have changed the course of twentieth-century thought. Written with energy, expertise and panache, The Quartet is a page-turning blend of research and recovery, storytelling, and a call to arms. Iris Murdoch, Philippa Foot, Mary Midgley and Elizabeth Anscombe were great friends and comrades in the (...)
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  8. Changing the Educational Landscape: Philosophy, Women, and Curriculum.Jane Roland Martin - 1994 - Routledge.
    Changing the Educational Landscape is a collection of the best-known and best-loved essays by the renowned feminist philosopher of education, Jane Roland Martin. The volume charts the remarkable intellectual development of a thinker who has travelled distinctively across a changing educational landscape. Trained as an analytic philosopher at a time before women or feminist ideas were welcome in the field, Martin brought a philosopher's detached perspective to her earliest efforts to reconstitute the curriculum. Her later essays on (...)
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  9.  2
    Emancipatory Struggles and Their Political Organisation: How Political Parties and Social Movements Respond to Changing Notions of Emancipation.Felix Butzlaff - 2022 - European Journal of Social Theory 25 (1):94-117.
    In this article, I address the ways in which debates in liberal, Marxist and postmodernist social theory have remoulded readings of emancipation – and how these reformulations have affected the organisation of emancipatory struggles by and in political parties and social movements. I focus on three conceptual ambiguities that have spurred theoretical disputes and restructured organisational imaginations of emancipation: who might struggle for liberation, to what end and in which ways. In all three respects, understandings of emancipation have become increasingly (...)
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  10. How Organisms Respond to Environmental Changes: From Phenotypes to Molecules (and Vice Versa).Massimo Pigliucci - 1996 - Trends in Ecology and Evolution 11 (4):168-173.
    The concept of reaction norms plays a crucial role in connecting molecular and evolutionary biology.
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  11.  17
    How Should We Respond To'delinquent'institutions?Toni Erskine - 2008 - Journal of International Political Theory 4 (1):1-8.
    In international politics, institutions – in the sense of formal organisations – are frequently portrayed as important bearers of duties and appropriate objects of blame. This makes eminent sense. Many states, multinational corporations, and intergovernmental organisations, to name a few types of institutional actor, have considerable capacities to respond to crises, address injustices – and, indeed, cause harm on a grand scale. When the United States , for example, is widely charged with a moral obligation to combat climate change, (...)
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  12.  15
    Projectification of Doctoral Training? How Research Fields Respond to a New Funding Regime.Marc Torka - 2018 - Minerva 56 (1):59-83.
    Funding is an important mechanism for exercising influence over ever more parts of academic systems. In order to do so, funding agencies attempt to export their functional and normative prerequisites for financing to new fields. One essential requirement for fundees is then to construct research processes in the form of a project beforehand, one that is limited in time, scope and content. This article demonstrates how the public funding of doctoral programs expands this model of project research from experienced academics (...)
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  13.  49
    Including Early Modern Women Writers in Survey Courses: A Call to Action.Jessica Gordon-Roth & Nancy Kendrick - 2015 - Metaphilosophy 46 (3):364-379.
    There are many reasons to include texts written by women in early modern philosophy courses. The most obvious one is accuracy: women helped to shape the philosophical landscape of the time. Thus, to craft a syllabus that wholly excludes women is to give students an inaccurate picture of the early modern period. Since it seems safe to assume that we all aim for accuracy, this should be reason enough to include women writers in our courses. This (...)
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  14.  1
    Men’s Perceptions of Women’s Rights and Changing Gender Relations in South Africa: Lessons for Working With Men and Boys in HIV and Antiviolence Programs.Dean Peacock, Abbey Hatcher, Christopher Colvin & Shari L. Dworkin - 2012 - Gender and Society 26 (1):97-120.
    Emerging out of increased attention to gender equality within violence and HIV prevention efforts in South African society has been an intensified focus on masculinities. Garnering a deeper understanding of how men respond to shifting gender relations and rights on the ground is of urgent importance, particularly since social constructions of gender are implicated in the HIV/aids epidemic. As social scientists collaborating on a rights-based HIV and antiviolence program, we sought to understand masculinities, rights, and gender norms across six (...)
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  15.  26
    Our Environmental Value Orientations Influence How We Respond to Climate Change.N. A. Marshall, L. Thiault, A. Beeden, R. Beeden, C. Benham, M. I. Curnock, A. Diedrich, G. G. Gurney, L. Jones, P. A. Marshall, N. Nakamura & P. Pert - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  16.  45
    Can Science and Religion Respond to Climate Change?Mary Evelyn Tucker - 2015 - Zygon 50 (4):949-961.
    With the challenge of communicating climate science in the United States and making progress in international negotiations on climate change there is a need for other approaches. The moral issues of ecological degradation and climate justice need to be integrated into social consciousness, political legislation, and climate treaties. Both science and religion can contribute to this integration with differentiated language but shared purpose. Recognizing the limits of both science and religion is critical to finding a way forward for addressing the (...)
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  17.  27
    Responding to the Global Challenges: Regional Entrepreneurship Within the Change Society. [REVIEW]Petra Dassen-Housen - 2002 - AI and Society 16 (3):188-209.
    In this paper, some fundamental aspects of societal change processes are described, leading to proposals of how to cope with such changes through continuous learning within society. This change society is presently emerging worldwide. It is very much shaped by advanced networked information and communication technology. Correspondingly, certain trends are identified in this paper which indicate the change processes towards this new emerging society. Subsequently, different personal skills are described which are required for all members of society to cope with (...)
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  18.  66
    How Universities Can Best Respond to the Climate Crisis and Other Global Problems.Nicholas Maxwell - 2021 - Philosophies 1 (1):1.
    The world is in a state of crisis. Global problems that threaten our future include: the climate crisis; the destruction of natural habitats, catastrophic loss of wild life, and mass extinction of species; lethal modern war; the spread of modern armaments; the menace of nuclear weapons; pollution of earth, sea and air; rapid rise in the human population; increasing antibiotic resistance; the degradation of democratic politics, brought about in part by the internet. It is not just that universities around the (...)
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  19. Responding to Morally Flawed Historical Philosophers and Philosophies.Nathan Nobis & Victor F. Abundez-Guerra - 2018 - 1000-Word Philosophy: An Introductory Anthology.
    Many historically-influential philosophers had profoundly wrong moral views or behaved very badly. Aristotle thought women were “deformed men” and that some people were slaves “by nature.” Descartes had disturbing views about non-human animals. Hume and Kant were racists. Hegel disparaged Africans. Nietzsche despised sick people. Mill condoned colonialism. Fanon was homophobic. Frege was anti-Semitic; Heidegger was a Nazi. Schopenhauer was sexist. Rousseau abandoned his children. Wittgenstein beat his young students. Unfortunately, these examples are just a start. -/- These philosophers (...)
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  20.  35
    Women Don't Get AIDS, They Just Die From It”: Memory, Classification, and the Campaign to Change the Definition of AIDS.Alexis Shotwell - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (2):509-525.
    In this paper, I examine activist group ACT UP's campaign to change the US Centers for Disease Control surveillance case definition of HIV and AIDS. This campaign's effects included a profound shift in how AIDS is understood, and thus in some real way in what it is. I argue that classification should be understood as a political formation with material effects, attending to the words of activists, most of them women, who contested the way AIDS was defined in a (...)
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  21.  60
    Climate Change, Buen Vivir, and the Dialectic of Enlightenment: Toward a Feminist Critical Philosophy of Climate Justice.Regina Cochrane - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (3):576-598.
    This paper examines the proposal that the indigenous cosmovision of buen vivir (good living)—the “organizing principle” of Ecuador's 2008 and Bolivia's 2009 constitutional reforms—constitutes an appropriate basis for responding to climate change. Advocates of this approach blame climate change on a “civilizational crisis” that is fundamentally a crisis of modern Enlightenment reason. Certain Latin American feminists and indigenous women, however, question the implications, for women, of any proposed “civilizational shift” seeking to reverse the human separation from nonhuman nature (...)
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  22.  35
    Katrina Hutchison and Fiona Jenkins , Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change?: Oxford University Press, 2013. ISBN 9780199325610, $24.95, Pbk.Leigh Duffy - 2016 - Journal of Value Inquiry 50 (2):495-500.
    In the introduction to Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change?, editors, Fiona Jenkins and Katrina Hutchison, note that women in many fields of study feel frustrated, hurt, or merely annoyed at some of their experiences in academia. However, they also note something unusual about these feelings when it comes to philosophy: the feelings have given way “to careful reflection on how to make sense of such experience, how to find an articulation of its form, structure, causes, and (...)
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  23.  3
    Anatomy of a Stalled Revolution: Processes of Reproduction and Change in Russian Women’s Gender Ideologies.Olga Isupova & Sarah Ashwin - 2018 - Gender and Society 32 (4):441-468.
    Russia’s gender revolution notoriously produced women’s economic empowerment without domestic equality. Although the Soviet state vastly expanded women’s employment, this had little impact on a starkly unequal gender division of domestic labor. Such “stalling” is common, but in Russia its extent and persistence presents a puzzle, requiring us to investigate linkages between macro-level factors and micro-level interactions regarding the gender division of domestic labor. We do this by focusing on gender ideology, an important variable explaining the gender division (...)
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  24. Responding to Humanitarian Crises.Cindy Holder - 2008 - In Larry May & Emily Crookston (eds.), War: Essays in Political Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 85-104.
    Everyone agrees that the international community must develop better mechanisms for responding to humanitarian crises. The best mechanism for responding is simply to intervene to prevent a crisis from developing in the first place. However, because the principle of sovereignty imposes strict constraints on action across state borders, international actors are often unwilling or unable to interpose themselves until after conditions have escalated into a full-blown crisis, by which time it has usually become a matter of managing human misery rather (...)
     
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  25.  36
    Katrina Hutchison and Fiona Jenkins : Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change?Anna Leuschner - 2015 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 46 (1):245-249.
    The current situation of women in philosophy is not rosy at all. There are a raising number of complaints from female philosophers about their working situation, about getting harassed, discouraged, isolated, or simply ignored. Numerous anecdotes are posted in online forums and weblogs, such as beingawomaninphilosophy.wordpress.com/or feministphilosophers.wordpress.com/. Apart from that, one can simply observe that much more men than women are employed in philosophical departments, give talks at philosophical conferences, and have articles published in philosophical journals. Katrina Hutchison (...)
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  26. How Have Corporate Codes of Ethics Responded to an Era of Increased Scrutiny?Tim Loughran, Bill McDonald & James R. Otteson - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-16.
    Over the past decade, corporate scandals have proliferated. These scandals, along with the emergence of the #MeToo movement and Environmental, Social, and Corporate Governance mandates, have increased the scrutiny of corporations’ ethics culture. How have companies responded in terms of the language appearing in their public ethics documents? We compare the Code of Ethics in 2008 versus 2019 for a sample of S&P 500 firms. For the vast majority of firms, their Code of Ethics lengthened, with the average 2019 code (...)
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  27.  6
    Asian American Women And Racialized Femininities: “Doing” Gender Across Cultural Worlds.Denise L. Johnson & Karen D. Pyke - 2003 - Gender and Society 17 (1):33-53.
    Integrating race and gender in a social constructionist framework, the authors examine the way that second-generation Asian American young women describe doing gender across ethnic and mainstream settings, as well as their assumptions about the nature of Asian and white femininities. This analysis of interviews with 100 daughters of Korean and Vietnamese immigrants finds that respondents narratively construct Asian and Asian American cultural worlds as quintessentially and uniformly patriarchal and fully resistant to change. In contradistinction, mainstream white America is (...)
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  28.  4
    Staying neutral or intervening?: Ethics teachers’ ideas on how to respond to alarming cases brought forward by medical students in class: A qualitative study in the Netherlands.Maartje Hoogsteyns & Amalia Muhaimin - 2021 - International Journal of Ethics Education 6 (2):273-288.
    Ethics teachers are regularly confronted with disturbing cases brought in by medical students in class. These classes are considered confidential, so that everyone can speak freely about their experiences. But what should ethics teachers do when they hear about a situation they consider to be outright alarming, for example where patients/students’ safety is at stake or where systematic power abuse seems to be at hand? Should they remain neutral or should they step in and intervene? In the Netherlands, as in (...)
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  29.  26
    Changes in Animal Welfare Views in New Zealand: Responding to Global Change.Alison Loveridge - 2013 - Society and Animals 21 (4):325-340.
    Consumer action is leading to increasing debate over on-farm activities in New Zealand. Both animal welfare activists and government organizations frequently refer to the importance of welfare standards in order to secure overseas markets, as well as in response to local concerns. This article explores rural and urban people’s views of welfare of animals kept on farms for commercial purposes in response to a 2008 survey commissioned by the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry. It compares and contrasts these recent findings (...)
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  30.  36
    A Normal Accident or a Sea-Change? Nuclear Host Communities Respond to the 3/11 Disaster.Daniel P. Aldrich - 2013 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 14 (2):261-276.
    While 3/11 has altered energy policies around the world, insufficient attention has focused on reactions from local nuclear power plant host communities and their neighbors throughout Japan. Using site visits to such towns, interviews with relevant actors, and secondary and tertiary literature, this article investigates the community crisis management strategies of two types of cities, towns, and villages: those which have nuclear plants directly in their backyards and neighboring cities further away (within a 30 mile radius). Responses to the disaster (...)
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  31.  87
    Can Liberalism Account for Women’s “Adaptive Preferences”?Lisa H. Schwartzman - 2007 - Social Philosophy Today 23:175-186.
    Feminist philosophers have questioned whether liberal theory can account for the phenomenon of adaptive preferences, specifically women’s preferences that are formed under conditions of sexist oppression. In this paper, I examine the argument of one feminist who addresses the problem of women’s “deformed desires” by relying on a liberal framework. Assessing her argument, I conclude that liberalism provides inadequate resources for responding to this issue since it errs in understanding adaptive preferences as exceptional, provides little explanation of how (...)
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  32.  17
    Cells in the Non‐Uniform Magnetic World: How Cells Respond to High‐Gradient Magnetic Fields.Vitalii Zablotskii, Tatyana Polyakova & Alexandr Dejneka - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (8):1800017.
    Imagine cells that live in a high‐gradient magnetic field (HGMF). Through what mechanisms do the cells sense a non‐uniform magnetic field and how such a field changes the cell fate? We show that magnetic forces generated by HGMFs can be comparable to intracellular forces and therefore may be capable of altering the functionality of an individual cell and tissues in unprecedented ways. We identify the cellular effectors of such fields and propose novel routes in cell biology predicting new biological effects (...)
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  33. How Do People Experience and Respond to Social Control From Their Partner? Three Daily Diary Studies.Urte Scholz, Gertraud Stadler, Corina Berli, Janina Lüscher & Nina Knoll - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Positive and negative forms of social control are commonly used to regulate another person’s health-related behaviors, especially in couples. Social control efforts have been shown to result in desirable, but also undesirable effects on different outcomes. Little is known for which outcomes, when, and under which contextual conditions these different effects unfold in people’s everyday lives. Using the dual-effects model of health-related social control, we predicted that same-day and previous-day positive social control would result in desirable effects on target behavior, (...)
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  34.  4
    How Dutch and Italian Women’s Networks Mobilize Affect to Foster Transformative Change Towards Gender Equality.Giovanna Declich, Elena del Giorgio, Daniela Falcinelli, Marina Cacace & Inge Bleijenbergh - 2021 - European Journal of Women's Studies 28 (1):10-25.
    This article contributes to the debate about the role of affect in transformative change towards gender equality, by comparing the building of affect in two recently founded women’s networks in Italian and Dutch universities. By conceptualizing networking as a social and cultural practice that organizes a collective body through the building of affect between specific groups of organizational stakeholders, we reveal the emotional, dynamic and context-dependent character of transformative change. We found that similar women’s networks build affect with (...)
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  35.  2
    Gendered Emotional Support and Women’s Well-Being in a Low-Income Urban African Setting.Yuko Hara, Shelley Clark & Sangeetha Madhavan - 2018 - Gender and Society 32 (6):837-859.
    In most contexts, emotional support is crucial for the well-being of low-income single women and their children. Support from women may be especially important for single mothers because of precarious ties to their children’s fathers, the prevalence of extended matrifocal living arrangements, and gendered norms that place men as providers of financial rather than emotional support. However, in contexts marked by economic insecurity, spatial dispersion of families, and changing gender norms and kinship obligations, such an expectation may (...)
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  36.  2
    Distancing as a Gendered Barrier: Understanding Women Scientists’ Gender Practices.Laura A. Rhoton - 2011 - Gender and Society 25 (6):696-716.
    Gendered barriers to women’s advancement in STEM disciplines are subtle, often the result of gender practices, gender stereotypes, and gendered occupational cultures. Professional socialization into scientific cultures encourages and rewards gender practices that help to maintain gendered barriers. This article focuses more specifically on how individual women scientists’ gender practices potentially sustain gender barriers. Findings based on interview data from thirty women in academic STEM fields reveal that women draw on gendered expectations and norms within their (...)
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  37.  2
    How Should the Precautionary Principle Apply to Pregnant Women in Clinical Research?Indira S. E. van der Zande, Rieke van der Graaf, Martijin A. Oudijk & Johannes J. M. van Delden - 2021 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 46 (5):516-529.
    The precautionary principle is often invoked in relation to pregnant women and may be one of the underlying reasons for their continuous underrepresentation in clinical research. The principle is appealing, because potential fetal harm as a result of research participation is considered to be serious and irreversible. In our paper, we explore through conceptual analysis whether and if so how the precautionary principle should apply to pregnant women. We argue that the principle is a decision-making strategy underlying risk-benefit (...)
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  38.  18
    Abandoning or Reimagining a Cultural Heartland? Understanding and Responding to Rewilding Conflicts in Wales - the Case of the Cambrian Wildwood.Sophie Wynne-Jones, Graham Strouts & George Holmes - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (4):377-403.
    This paper is about rewilding and the tensions it involves. Rewilding is a relatively novel approach to nature conservation, which seeks to be proactive and ambitious in the face of continuing environmental decline. Whilst definitions of rewilding place a strong emphasis on non-human agency, it is an inescapably human aspiration resulting in a range of social conflicts. The paper focuses on the case study of the Cambrian Wildwood project in Mid Wales, evaluating the ways in which debate and strategic action (...)
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  39.  85
    Women in Philosophy: Quantitative Analyses of Specialization, Prevalence, Visibility, and Generational Change.Eric Schwitzgebel & Carolyn Dicey Jennings - 2017 - Public Affairs Quarterly 31:83-105.
    We present several quantitative analyses of the prevalence and visibility of women in moral, political, and social philosophy, compared to other areas of philosophy, and how the situation has changed over time. Measures include faculty lists from the Philosophical Gourmet Report, PhD job placement data from the Academic Placement Data and Analysis project, the National Science Foundation's Survey of Earned Doctorates, conference programs of the American Philosophical Association, authorship in elite philosophy journals, citation in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, (...)
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  40. A Vision for Science Education: Responding to Peter Fensham's Work.Roger Cross (ed.) - 2002 - Routledge.
    One of the most important and consistent voices in the reform of science education over the last thirty years has been that of Peter Fensham. His vision of a democratic and socially responsible science education for all has inspired change in schools and colleges throughout the world. Often moving against the tide, Fensham travelled the world to promote his radical ideology. He was appointed Australia's first Professor of Science Education, and was later made a Member of the Order of Australia (...)
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  41.  10
    Sarah Orne Jewett’s Depictions of Women in a Changing Medical Profession: Nan Prince and Almira Todd.Catherine Hand - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (4):e5-e5.
    Sarah Orne Jewett, who lived from 1849 to 1909, witnessed a revolution in medicine that led to the formation of the medical profession as it is recognised today. By comparing two of the author’s works, one written at the outset of her career and the other written much later, this paper discusses how Jewett’s views about women’s role in medicine changed and developed. In the first novel, A Country Doctor, a young Jewett celebrates the new-found power of scientific medicine (...)
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  42.  1
    Natalia Ginzburg, Clara Sereni and Lia Levi: Jewish Italian Women Recapturing Cities, Families and National Memories.F. K. Clementi - 2014 - European Journal of Women's Studies 21 (2):132-147.
    To this day, the Italian Jewish literary postwar canon is undisputedly ruled by Primo Levi, Giorgio Bassani and Carlo Levi. This study of three major Italian Jewish women writers – Natalia Ginzburg, Clara Sereni and Lia Levi – highlights the presence in Italian literature of a subversive Jewish écriture feminine. These writers’ formal independence and subversive redeployment of narrative and thematic strategies not only consolidated a strong female voice in Italian literature but also produced a specific Italian brand of (...)
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  43.  19
    How Must I Explain to the Dolphins?Yvette Abrahams - 2018 - Environmental Ethics 40 (4):389-404.
    The story of change and growth, i.e., evolution, in the traditional manner, involves an epistemology of indigenous knowledge systems that admits both evolution and the divine—and therefore the human capacity for free choice—that tells us that fossil fuels are a bad choice. Steven Biko’s message of “Black Consciousness” responds to the dilemma of how we belong to the species that is damaging the planetary ecosystem, amd yet how we can deny complicity by saying that reclaiming our culture enables us to (...)
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  44.  69
    The Impact of Work-Related Values on the Readiness to Change in Estonian Organizations.Ruth Alas - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 86 (2):113-124.
    This study contributes to our understanding of how work-related values, including ethics, are connected with the readiness to change in Estonian organizations. Research in Estonian companies involved 747 respondents. The author examined the influence of work-related values on attitude towards change and organizational learning. Empirical research in Estonian organizations indicates that work-related values predict attitude towards change and organizational learning. This study indicates the need for ethical conduct to achieve a competitive advantage in Estonia. Guidelines for managers and a model (...)
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  45.  31
    The Robustness of Medical Professional Ethics When Times Are Changing: A Comparative Study of General Practitioner Ethics and Surgery Ethics in The Netherlands.J. Dwarswaard, M. Hilhorst & M. Trappenburg - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (10):621-625.
    Society in the 21st century is in many ways different from society in the 1950s, the 1960s or the 1970s. Two of the most important changes relate to the level of education in the population and the balance between work and private life. These days a large percentage of people are highly educated. Partly as a result of economic progress in the 1950s and the 1960s and partly due to the fact that many women entered the labour force, people (...)
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  46.  17
    To Learn the World Again: Examining the Impact of Elective Breast Surgery on Body Schema.Sara Rodrigues - 2018 - Human Studies 41 (2):255-273.
    This paper comprises a feminist phenomenological exploration of women’s experiences with breast augmentation and breast reduction. Situating the results of semi-structured interviews in the context of body schema, this study discloses how women perceive, think, feel and respond to bodily change created by elective breast surgery. Women’s narratives express that breast augmentation and reduction shifted their conception of the lived body and its possibilities by provoking bodily reorientations and adjustments as well as changes in bodily sensations. (...)
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  47.  49
    How Friendly Are Family Friendly Policies?Gloria H. Albrecht - 2003 - Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (2):177-192.
    In the last two decades the composition of the labor force in the United States has changed significantly. Today, most employeesare mothers or fathers of children under eighteen in families where both parents are employed or where the employed parent is a single mother. This represents a reversal of the older family ideal in which a father worked to provide income and a mother performed the domestic work that sustained families. The practices of business and much of the attention of (...)
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    Why It is Unethical to Charge Migrant Women for Pregnancy Care in the National Health Service.Arianne Shahvisi & Fionnuala Finnerty - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (8):489-496.
    Pregnancy care is chargeable for migrants who do not have indefinite leave to remain in the UK. Women who are not ‘ordinarily resident’, including prospective asylum applicants, some refused asylum-seekers, unidentified victims of trafficking and undocumented people are required to pay substantial charges in order to access antenatal, intrapartum and postnatal services as well as abortion care within the National Health Service. In this paper, we consider the ethical issues generated by the exclusion of pregnancy care from the raft (...)
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    Women Responding to the Anti-Islam Film Fitna: Voices and Acts of Citizenship on Youtube.Sabina Mihelj, Liesbet van Zoonen & Farida Vis - 2011 - Feminist Review 97 (1):110-129.
    In 2008, Dutch anti-Islam Member of Parliament Geert Wilders produced a short video called Fitna to visualize his argument that Islam is a dangerous religion. Thousands of men and women across the globe uploaded their own videos to YouTube to criticize or support the film. In this article, we look at these alternative videos from a feminist perspective, contrasting the gender portrayal and narratives in Fitna with those in the alternative videos. We contend that Fitna expressed an extremist Orientalist (...)
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  50.  30
    Fine-Tuning the Ontology of Patriarchy: A New Approach to Explaining and Responding to a Persisting Social Injustice.Lantz Fleming Miller - 2015 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 41 (9):885-906.
    After years of activism and scholarship concerning patriarchal social structures, many contemporary societies have made substantial progress in women’s rights. The shortfall, and the work ahead, is well known. Even in societies where the most progress has been achieved, males continue to dominate at key levels of power. Yet, essentialism appears to be widely, although not yet entirely, discounted. In helping to illuminate the social ontology of patriarchy and thereby helping to defuse its injustice, scholars have made proposals of (...)
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