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Holly Moore [5]Holly G. Moore [3]
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Holly Moore
Luther College
  1.  26
    Why Does Thrasymachus Blush? Ethical Consistency in Socrates' Refutation of Thrasymachus.Holly Moore - 2015 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 32 (2):321-343.
    Most scholars agree that Socrates’ arguments in the course of his refutation of Thrasymachus in Plato’s Republic are at best weak and at worse fallacious. Some interpreters have used this logical inadequacy to argue that Socrates’ aim is psychotherapeutic rather than cognitive, but this does not address why Thrasymachus feels shamed. I argue in this article that Thrasymachus blushes not simply because his explicit propositions are contradictory but because two principles of his sophistic ēthos—that his skill requires knowledge and that (...)
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    Why Does Thrasymachus Blush? Ethical Consistency in Socrates’ Refutation of Thrasymachus.Holly Moore - 2015 - Polis 32 (2):321-343.
  3. Animal Sacrifice in Plato's Later Methodology.Holly Moore - 2015 - In Jeremy Bell, Michael Naas & Thomas Patrick Oates (eds.), Plato's Animals: Gadflies, Horses, Swans, and Other Philosophical Beasts. Indianapolis, IN, USA: pp. 179-192.
    In both the Phaedrus and Statesman dialogues, the dialectician's method of division is likened to the butchery of sacrificial animals. Interpreting the significance of this metaphor by analyzing ancient Greek sacrificial practice, this essay argues that, despite the ubiquity of the method of division in these later dialogues, Plato is there stressing the logical priority of the method of collection, division's dialectical twin. Although Plato prioritizes the method of collection, the author further argues that, through a kind of 'domestication' of (...)
     
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  4. Plato's Analogical Thought.Holly Moore - 2009 - Dissertation, DePaul University
    The philosophical concept of analogy is fundamental to the theory of imaging that characterizes Plato’s metaphysics, cosmology, and methodology. While Plato never explicitly conceptualizes the philosophical role of analogy, his dialogues are rife with analogies and images that are often pivotal to the thought expressed there. An analysis of celebrated analogies such as the sun and the good in the Republic, the “second sailing” in the Phaedo, the “receptacle” (chōra) in the Timaeus, and the example of weaving in the Statesman (...)
     
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  5. Socrates, Fifth-Century Sage.Holly G. Moore - 2000 - Dissertation, Pennsylvania State University
    An undergraduate honors thesis, this work addresses the question of whether or not the historical Socrates is best understood as a sophist, the charge Plato seems most keen to refute. Using the evidence of both Plato's dialogues and other contemporary sources, this study assesses potential arguments regarding Socrates' identity, putting forward the position that Socrates is most accurately to be described not as a sophist but as a "sage" (Greek: sophos). Although the "sage" is a model drawn from the 6th (...)
     
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  6.  14
    Platonic Epogoge and the “Purification” of the Method of Collection in Advance.Holly G. Moore - forthcoming - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy.
    Despite Aristotle’s claim in Topics I that all dialectical argument is either syllogism or epagōgē, modern scholars have largely neglected to assess the role of epagōgē in Platonic dialectic. Though epagōgē has no technical use in Plato, I argue that the method of collection (which, along with division (diairēsis), is central to many of the dialogues’ accounts of dialectic) functions as the Platonic predecessor to Aristotelian epagōgē. An analysis of passages from the Sophist and Statesman suggests that collection is a (...)
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    Platonic Epogōgē and the “Purification” of the Method of Collection.Holly G. Moore - 2019 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (2):353-364.
    Despite Aristotle’s claim in Topics I that all dialectical argument is either syllogism or epagoge, modern scholars have largely neglected to assess the role of epagoge in Platonic dialectic. Though epagoge has no technical use in Plato, I argue that the method of collection functions as the Platonic predecessor to Aristotelian epagoge. An analysis of passages from the Sophist and Statesman suggests that collection is a purificatory practice. I argue that collection is not only Plato’s account of generalization from a (...)
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  8.  15
    ""From the" Gotcha!" to Immanent Critique.Holly Moore - 2012 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 2 (1):87-91.
    Students often enter a philosophy class believing that philosophy is the practice of logical one-upmanship. Defusing the in-class strategies that endorse this view is pedagogically challenging, but the theoretical tradition of immanent critique offers an opportunity to mobilize students’ thirst for honest philosophical debate in order to achieve a deeper understanding of the role of critique in philosophical discourse. In these reflections, I argue that what I will call the “gotcha” critique, often employed by students to fend off a more (...)
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