9 found
Order:
See also
Hilary Bowman-Smart
University of South Australia
  1.  9
    Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing for “Non-Medical” Traits: Ensuring Consistency in Ethical Decision-Making.Hilary Bowman-Smart, Christopher Gyngell, Cara Mand, David J. Amor, Martin B. Delatycki & Julian Savulescu - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (3):3-20.
    The scope of noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) could expand in the future to include detailed analysis of the fetal genome. This will allow for the testing for virtually any trait with a genetic contribution, including “non-medical” traits. Here we discuss the potential use of NIPT for these traits. We outline a scenario which highlights possible inconsistencies with ethical decision-making. We then discuss the case against permitting these uses. The objections include practical problems; increasing inequities; increasing the burden of choice; negative (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  2.  16
    Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing for “Non-Medical” Traits: Ensuring Consistency in Ethical Decision-Making.Hilary Bowman-Smart, Christopher Gyngell, Cara Mand, David J. Amor, Martin B. Delatycki & Julian Savulescu - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (3):3-20.
    The scope of noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) could expand in the future to include detailed analysis of the fetal genome. This will allow for the testing for virtually any trait with a genetic contribution, including “non-medical” traits. Here we discuss the potential use of NIPT for these traits. We outline a scenario which highlights possible inconsistencies with ethical decision-making. We then discuss the case against permitting these uses. The objections include practical problems; increasing inequities; increasing the burden of choice; negative (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  3.  62
    Moral reasons to edit the human genome: picking up from the Nuffield report.Christopher Gyngell, Hilary Bowman-Smart & Julian Savulescu - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (8):514-523.
    In July 2018, the Nuffield Council of Bioethics released its long-awaited report on heritable genome editing. The Nuffield report was notable for finding that HGE could be morally permissible, even in cases of human enhancement. In this paper, we summarise the findings of the Nuffield Council report, critically examine the guiding principles they endorse and suggest ways in which the guiding principles could be strengthened. While we support the approach taken by the Nuffield Council, we argue that detailed consideration of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  4.  29
    ‘Is it better not to know certain things?’: views of women who have undergone non-invasive prenatal testing on its possible future applications.Hilary Bowman-Smart, Julian Savulescu, Cara Mand, Christopher Gyngell, Mark D. Pertile, Sharon Lewis & Martin B. Delatycki - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (4):231-238.
    Non-invasive prenatal testing is at the forefront of prenatal screening. Current uses for NIPT include fetal sex determination and screening for chromosomal disorders such as trisomy 21. However, NIPT may be expanded to many different future applications. There are a potential host of ethical concerns around the expanding use of NIPT, as examined by the recent Nuffield Council report on the topic. It is important to examine what NIPT might be used for before these possibilities become consumer reality. There is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  5. Generative AI entails a credit–blame asymmetry.Sebastian Porsdam Mann, Brian D. Earp, Sven Nyholm, John Danaher, Nikolaj Møller, Hilary Bowman-Smart, Joshua Hatherley, Julian Koplin, Monika Plozza, Daniel Rodger, Peter V. Treit, Gregory Renard, John McMillan & Julian Savulescu - 2023 - Nature Machine Intelligence 5 (5):472-475.
    Generative AI programs can produce high-quality written and visual content that may be used for good or ill. We argue that a credit–blame asymmetry arises for assigning responsibility for these outputs and discuss urgent ethical and policy implications focused on large-scale language models.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  17
    The moral case for sign language education.Julian Savulescu, Angela Morgan, Christopher Gyngell & Hilary Bowman-Smart - 2019 - Monash Bioethics Review 37 (3-4):94-110.
    Here, a moral case is presented as to why sign languages such as Auslan should be made compulsory in general school curricula. Firstly, there are significant benefits that accrue to individuals from learning sign language. Secondly, sign language education is a matter of justice; the normalisation of sign language education and use would particularly benefit marginalised groups, such as those living with a communication disability. Finally, the integration of sign languages into the curricula would enable the flourishing of Deaf culture (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7.  10
    Fetal information as shared information: using NIPT to test for adult-onset conditions.Michelle Taylor-Sands & Hilary Bowman-Smart - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (Suppl 1):82-102.
    The possibilities of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) are expanding, and the use of NIPT for adult-onset conditions may become widely available in the near future. If parents use NIPT to test for these conditions, and the pregnancy is continued, they will have information about the child’s genetic predisposition from birth. In this paper, we argue that prospective parents should be able to access NIPT for an adult-onset condition, even when they have no intention to terminate the pregnancy. We begin by (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  25
    Orphans by Design: The Future of Genetic Parenthood.Hilary Bowman-Smart - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (1):23-30.
    Establishing the nature of genetic parenthood is an important task. This is, firstly, because many people desire that relationship and it is in their interest to know what that is, and secondly, because there is a view that it may incur certain moral obligations between the genetic parent and their child. Many theorists have made attempts to define exactly what genetic parenthood is. I show that these definitions are deficient if they wish to fully capture all reproductive scenarios in ways (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  2
    Storing paediatric genomic data for sequential interrogation across the lifespan.Christopher Gyngell, Fiona Lynch, Danya Vears, Hilary Bowman-Smart, Julian Savulescu & John Christodoulou - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Genomic sequencing (GS) is increasingly used in paediatric medicine to aid in screening, research and treatment. Some health systems are trialling GS as a first-line test in newborn screening programmes. Questions about what to do with genomic data after it has been generated are becoming more pertinent. While other research has outlined the ethical reasons for storing deidentified genomic data to be used in research, the ethical case for storing data for future clinical use has not been explicated. In this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark