Results for 'Henry S. Cheang'

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  1.  79
    Institutionally Divided Moral Responsibility*: HENRY S. RICHARDSON.Henry S. Richardson - 1999 - Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (2):218-249.
    I am going to be discussing a mode of moral responsibility that anglophone philosophers have largely neglected. It is a type of responsibility that looks to the future rather than the past. Because this forward-looking moral responsibility is relatively unfamiliar in the lexicon of analytic philosophy, many of my locutions will initially strike many readers as odd. As a matter of everyday speech, however, the notion of forward-looking moral responsibility is perfectly familiar. Today, for instance, I said I would be (...)
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  2.  14
    Discerning Subordination and Inviolability: A Comment on Kamm's Intricate Ethics: Henry S. Richardson.Henry S. Richardson - 2008 - Utilitas 20 (1):81-91.
    Frances Kamm has for some time now been a foremost champion of non-consequentialist ethics. One of her most powerful non-consequentialist themes has been the idea of inviolability. Morality's prohibitions, she argues, confer on persons the status of inviolability. This thought helps articulate a rationale for moral prohibitions that will resist the protean threat posed by the consequentialist argument that anyone should surely be willing to violate a constraint if doing so will minimize the overall number of such violations. As Kamm (...)
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  3.  10
    Review: Henry S. Leonard, Two-Valued Truth Tables for Modal Functions. [REVIEW]Jan Kalicki - 1951 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 16 (4):288-288.
  4.  7
    Leonard Henry S.. Two-Valued Truth Tables for Modal Functions. Structure, Method and Meaning, Essays in Honor of Henry M. Sheffer, Edited by Henle Paul, Kallen Horace M., and Langer Susanne K., The Liberal Arts Press, New York 1951, Pp. 42–67. [REVIEW]Jan Kalicki - 1951 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 16 (4):288-288.
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  5. The Calculus of Individuals and its Uses.Henry S. Leonard & Nelson Goodman - 1940 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 5 (2):45-55.
  6.  57
    The Logical Structure of Sittlichkeit: A Reading of Hegel’s Philosophy of Right.Henry S. Richardson - 1989 - Idealistic Studies 19 (1):62-78.
    Sittlichkeit seduces: Hegel’s third category of Right, intended to synthesize impartially derived rights with a subjectively centered morality of the good, understandably piques the hopes of his modern readers. How could it not? Sittlichkeit, Ethical Life, holds out the prospect of so much that we still seek. It promises to reconcile welfare and autonomy while guaranteeing concrete content for their product. By combining legal duty with a place for conscience and freedom, it could solve a central problem of politics. Most (...)
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  7. Specifying Norms as a Way to Resolve Concrete Ethical Problems.Henry S. Richardson - 1990 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 19 (4):279-310.
  8.  64
    Practical Reasoning About Final Ends.Henry S. Richardson - 1994 - Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.
    Henry Richardson argues that we can determine our ends rationally. He constructs a rich and original theory of how we can reason about our final goals. Richardson defuses the counter-arguments for the limits of rational deliberation, and develops interesting ideas about how his model might be extended to interpersonal deliberation of ends, taking him to the borders of political theory. Along the way Richardson offers illuminating discussions of, inter alia, Aristotle, Aquinas, Sidgwick, and Dewey, as well as the work (...)
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  9.  45
    The Logical Structure of Sittlichkeit: A Reading of Hegel’s Philosophy of Right.Henry S. Richardson - 1989 - Idealistic Studies 19:62.
    Sittlichkeit seduces: Hegel’s third category of Right, intended to synthesize impartially derived rights with a subjectively centered morality of the good, understandably piques the hopes of his modern readers. How could it not? Sittlichkeit, Ethical Life, holds out the prospect of so much that we still seek. It promises to reconcile welfare and autonomy while guaranteeing concrete content for their product. By combining legal duty with a place for conscience and freedom, it could solve a central problem of politics. Most (...)
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  10.  34
    Incidental Findings and Ancillary-Care Obligations.Henry S. Richardson - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):256-270.
    Recent work on incidental fndings, concentrating on the difcult problems posed by the ambiguous results often generated by high-tech medicine, has proceeded largely independently from recent work on medical researchers' ancillary-care obligations, the obligations that researchers have to deal with diseases or conditions besides the one(s) under study. This paper contends that the two topics are morally linked, and specifcally that a sound understanding of ancillary-care obligations will center them on incidental fndings. The paper sets out and defends an understanding (...)
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  11.  21
    Incidental Findings and Ancillary-Care Obligations.Henry S. Richardson - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):256-270.
    This paper explores the convergence of two recent and growing streams of bioethical work and concern. Each has originated independently, but each arises from the fact that the Common Rule that has shaped medical research ethics, as institutionalized in the United States and also abroad, is largely silent about what needs to be done in response to researchers’ positive obligations. One stream concerns what to do about the sometimes vast range of findings that may arise incidentally to performing research procedures. (...)
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  12. Democratic Autonomy: Public Reasoning About the Ends of Policy.Henry S. Richardson - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 71 (1):204-210.
     
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  13. Moral Entanglements: The Ancillary-Care Obligations of Medical Researchers.Henry S. Richardson - 2012 - Oup Usa.
    The philosopher Henry Richardson's short book is a defense of a position on a neglected topic in medical research ethics. Clinical research ethics has been a longstanding area of study, dating back to the aftermath of the Nazi death-camp doctors and the Tuskegee syphilis study. Most ethical regulations and institutions have developed in response to those past abuses, including the stress on obtaining informed consent from the subject. Richardson points out that that these ethical regulations do not address one (...)
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  14. Republicanism and Democratic Injustice.Henry S. Richardson - 2006 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 5 (2):175-200.
    A Theory of Freedom and Government has provided a systematic basis for republican theory in the idea of freedom as non-domination. Can a pure republican view, which confines itself to the normative resources thus afforded, adequately address the full range of issues of social justice? This article argues that while there are many sorts of structural injustice with which a pure republican view can well cope, unfair disparities in political influence, of the kind that Rawls labeled failures of the ‘fair (...)
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  15.  33
    The Ancillary‐Care Responsibilities of Medical Researchers: An Ethical Framework for Thinking About the Clinical Care That Researchers Owe Their Subjects.Henry S. Richardson & Leah Belsky - 2004 - Hastings Center Report 34 (1):25-33.
  16.  5
    Practical Reasoning About Final Ends.Henry S. Richardson - 1994 - Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.
    Henry Richardson argues that we can determine our ends rationally. He constructs a rich and original theory of how we can reason about our final goals. Richardson defuses the counter-arguments for the limits of rational deliberation, and develops interesting ideas about how his model might be extended to interpersonal deliberation of ends, taking him to the borders of political theory. Along the way Richardson offers illuminating discussions of, inter alia, Aristotle, Aquinas, Sidgwick, and Dewey, as well as the work (...)
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  17.  14
    The Calculus of Individuals and Its Uses.Henry S. Leonard & Nelson Goodman - 1940 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 5 (3):113-114.
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  18.  84
    Discerning Subordination and Inviolability: A Comment on Kamm's Intricate Ethics.Henry S. Richardson - 2008 - Utilitas 20 (1):81-91.
    Frances Kamm has for some time now been a foremost champion of non-consequentialist ethics. One of her most powerful non-consequentialist themes has been the idea of inviolability. Morality's prohibitions, she argues, confer on persons the status of inviolability. This thought helps articulate a rationale for moral prohibitions that will resist the protean threat posed by the consequentialist argument that anyone should surely be willing to violate a constraint if doing so will minimize the overall number of such violations. As Kamm (...)
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  19. Liberalism, Deliberative Democracy, and “Reasons That All Can Accept”.Henry S. Richardson & James Bohman - 2009 - Journal of Political Philosophy 17 (3):253-274.
  20.  88
    Specifying, Balancing, and Interpreting Bioethical Principles.Henry S. Richardson - 2000 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (3):285 – 307.
    The notion that it is useful to specify norms progressively in order to resolve doubts about what to do, which I developed initially in a 1990 article, has been only partly assimilated by the bioethics literature. The thought is not just that it is helpful to work with relatively specific norms. It is more than that: specification can replace deductive subsumption and balancing. Here I argue against two versions of reliance on balancing that are prominent in recent bioethical discussions. Without (...)
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  21. Moral Reasoning.Henry S. Richardson - 2013 - The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Moral reasoning is individual or collective practical reasoning about what, morally, one ought to do. Philosophical examination of moral reasoning faces both distinctive puzzles — about how we recognize moral considerations and cope with conflicts among them and about how they move us to act — and distinctive opportunities for gleaning insight about what we ought to do from how we reason about what we ought to do.
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  22. Rawlsian Social-Contract Theory and the Severely Disabled.Henry S. Richardson - 2006 - The Journal of Ethics 10 (4):419-462.
    Martha Nussbaum has powerfully argued in Frontiers ofJustice and elsewhere that John Rawls’s sort of social-contract theory cannot usefully be deployed to deal with issues pertaining to justice for the disabled. To counter this claim, this article deploys Rawls’s sort of social-contract theory in order to deal with issues pertaining to justice for the disabled—or, since, as Nussbaum stresses, we all have some degree of disability—for the severely disabled. In this way, rather than questioning one by one Nussbaum’s interpretive claims (...)
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  23.  32
    Autonomy's Many Normative Presuppositions.Henry S. Richardson - 2001 - American Philosophical Quarterly 38 (3):287 - 303.
  24.  33
    Estlund’s Promising Account of Democratic Authority.Henry S. Richardson - 2011 - Ethics 121 (2):301-334.
  25.  30
    Truth and Ends in Dewey's Pragmatism.Henry S. Richardson - 1998 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 28 (sup1):109-147.
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  26. The Logic of Existence.Henry S. Leonard - 1956 - Philosophical Studies 7 (4):49 - 64.
  27.  80
    Beyond Good and Right: Toward a Constructive Ethical Pragmatism.Henry S. Richardson - 1995 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 24 (2):108-141.
  28.  26
    Testability and Meaning.Henry S. Leonard & Rudolf Carnap - 1937 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 2 (1):49.
  29. Practical Reasoning about Final Ends.Henry S. Richardson - 1996 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 58 (4):782-783.
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  30.  21
    Announcing an Improvement to the Journal’s Blind Review Process.Henry S. Richardson - 2017 - Ethics 127 (3):519-520.
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  31. The Orthodox Foundation of Religion Long Since Collected by That Iudicious and Elegant Man, Mr. Henry Ainsworth, for the Benefit of His Private Company, and Now Divulged for the Publike Good of All That Desire to Know That Cornerstone, Christ Jesus Crucified.Henry Ainsworth & W. S. - 1641 - Printed by R.C. For M. Sparke, Junior.
     
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  32.  15
    Innovation in a Learning Healthcare System.Henry S. Sacks & Rosamond Rhodes - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (6):19-21.
    Volume 19, Issue 6, June 2019, Page 19-21.
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  33.  69
    Long as You Love Me, It's Alright?Henry S. Richardson - 2003 - Philosophical Studies 116 (2):183-195.
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  34.  41
    Democratic Intentions.Henry S. Richardson - 1997 - Modern Schoolman 74 (4):285-300.
  35. 10. Douglas Portmore, Commonsense Consequentialism: Wherein Morality Meets Rationality Douglas Portmore, Commonsense Consequentialism: Wherein Morality Meets Rationality (Pp. 179-183). [REVIEW]Henry S. Richardson, Katarzyna de Lazari-Radek, Peter Singer, Karen Jones, Sergio Tenenbaum, Diana Raffman, Simon Căbulea May, Stephen C. Makin & Nancy E. Snow - 2012 - Ethics 123 (1).
  36.  72
    Relying on Experts as We Reason Together.Henry S. Richardson - 2012 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 22 (2):91-110.
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  37.  5
    Review of Rutger Claassen’s Capabilities in a Just Society: A Theory of Navigational Agency. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018, 264 Pp. [REVIEW]Henry S. Richardson - 2020 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 13 (1).
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  38. Animal Rights, by J. S. Mackenzie. [REVIEW]Henry S. Salt - 1915 - Ethics 26:567.
  39.  5
    Partial Entrustment in Pragmatic Clinical Trials.Henry S. Richardson & Mildred K. Cho - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (1):24-26.
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  40.  60
    Degrees of Finality and the Highest Good in Aristotle.Henry S. Richardson - 1992 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 30 (3):327-352.
    This article develops a uniform interpretation of "pursuit for the sake of an end", explaining what an "unqualified final" end (sought solely for its own sake) offers that a (merely) final one does not and providing an improved account of what Aristotle means by an "ultimate end". This interpretation sheds light on (1) the regress argument at the outset of "N.E." I.2, (2) the way Aristotle argues for the existence of a highest good, (3) the special contribution of "self-sufficiency" (autarkeia) (...)
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  41. Why Henry’s Critique of Heidegger Remains Problematic: Appearing and Speaking in Heidegger and Henry.Niall Keane - 2009 - Studia Phaenomenologica 9:193-212.
    This paper addresses a hitherto unexamined issue in the work of Michel Henry, namely, his critical interpretation of Martin Heidegger’s analysis of “appearing” and “speaking.” Throughout his distinguished career, Henry went to great philosophical lengths to distance himself from traditional phenomenology and from the work of Heidegger. However, for the most part, Henry’s critical reading of Heidegger has received little attention from phenomenologists and even that has been cursory. Hence, the central aim of this paper is twofold: (...)
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  42.  19
    Henry's Voices: The Representation of Auditory Verbal Hallucinations in an Autobiographical Narrative.Zsófia Demjén & Elena Semino - 2015 - Medical Humanities 41 (1):57-62.
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  43.  70
    Interrogatives, Imperatives, Truth, Falsity and Lies.Henry S. Leonard - 1959 - Philosophy of Science 26 (3):172-186.
    This paper aims to establish three major theses: (1) Not only declarative sentences, but also interrogatives and imperatives, may be classified as true or as false. (2) Declarative, imperative, and interrogative utterances may also be classified as honest or as dishonest. (3) Whether an utterance is honest or dishonest is logically independent of whether it is true or is false. The establishment of the above theses follows upon the adoption of a principle for identifying what is meant by any sentence, (...)
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  44. Hegel's Ladder: Volume I: The Pilgrimage of Reason. Volume Ii: The Odyssey of Spirit.Henry S. Harris - 1997 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    A two-volume set. Print edition available in cloth only. Awarded the Nicholas Hoare/Renaud-Bray Canadian Philosophical Association Book Prize, 2001 From the Preface: _Hegel's Ladder_ aspires to be... a ‘literal commentary’ on _Die Phänomenologie des Geistes_.... It was the conscious goal of my thirty-year struggle with Hegel to write an explanatory commentary on this book; and with its completion I regard my own ‘working’ career as concluded.... The prevailing habit of commentators... is founded on the general consensus of opinion that whatever (...)
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  45.  6
    Should Hospital Policy Require Consent for Practicing Invasive Procedures on Cadavers? The Arguments, Conclusions, and Lessons From One Ethics Committee's Deliberations.Henry S. Perkins & Anna M. Gordon - 1994 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 5 (3):204.
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  46. Measurement, Pleasure, and Practical Science in Plato's "Protagoras".Henry S. Richardson - 1990 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 28 (1):7.
  47. Satisficing: Not Good Enough.Henry S. Richardson - 2004 - In Michael Byron (ed.), Satisficing and Maximizing: Moral Theorists on Practical Reason. Cambridge University Press. pp. 106--130.
  48. Hegel's Intellectual Development to 1807.Henry S. Harris - 1993 - In Frederick C. Beiser (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Hegel. Cambridge University Press. pp. 25--51.
     
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  49.  9
    Hegel's Image of Phenomenology.Henry S. Harris - 1984 - In Kah Kyung Cho (ed.), Philosophy and Science in Phenomenological Perspective. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 95--109.
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  50.  27
    Capabilities and the Definition of Health: Comments on Venkatapuram.Henry S. Richardson - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (1):1-7.
    Sridhar Venkatapuram's Health Justice argues that health is a ‘metacapability’ – specifically, as the metacapability of having the ten ‘central human capabilities’ described by Martha Nussbaum. This cannot be right, as it provides no basis for distinguishing health from education, riches, or love. An amendment correcting this problem is suggested, namely that health is the involuntary, bodily aspect of the metacapability for the central capabilities. This amendment is defended against the objection that it fails to capture some important aspects of (...)
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