101 found
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  1. An ethical framework for global vaccine allocation.Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Govind Persad, Adam Kern, Allen E. Buchanan, Cecile Fabre, Daniel Halliday, Joseph Heath, Lisa M. Herzog, R. J. Leland, Ephrem T. Lemango, Florencia Luna, Matthew McCoy, Ole F. Norheim, Trygve Ottersen, G. Owen Schaefer, Kok-Chor Tan, Christopher Heath Wellman, Jonathan Wolff & Henry S. Richardson - 2020 - Science 1:DOI: 10.1126/science.abe2803.
    In this article, we propose the Fair Priority Model for COVID-19 vaccine distribution, and emphasize three fundamental values we believe should be considered when distributing a COVID-19 vaccine among countries: Benefiting people and limiting harm, prioritizing the disadvantaged, and equal moral concern for all individuals. The Priority Model addresses these values by focusing on mitigating three types of harms caused by COVID-19: death and permanent organ damage, indirect health consequences, such as health care system strain and stress, as well as (...)
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  2. Specifying norms as a way to resolve concrete ethical problems.Henry S. Richardson - 1990 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 19 (4):279-310.
  3.  44
    Practical Reasoning About Final Ends.Henry S. Richardson - 1994 - Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.
    Henry Richardson argues that we can determine our ends rationally. He constructs a rich and original theory of how we can reason about our final goals. Richardson defuses the counter-arguments for the limits of rational deliberation, and develops interesting ideas about how his model might be extended to interpersonal deliberation of ends, taking him to the borders of political theory. Along the way Richardson offers illuminating discussions of, inter alia, Aristotle, Aquinas, Sidgwick, and Dewey, as well as the work of (...)
  4.  52
    The Ancillary‐Care Responsibilities of Medical Researchers: An Ethical Framework for Thinking about the Clinical Care that Researchers Owe Their Subjects.Henry S. Richardson & Leah Belsky - 2004 - Hastings Center Report 34 (1):25-33.
    Researchers do not owe their subjects the same level of care that physicians owe patients, but they owe more than merely what the research protocol stipulates. In keeping with the dynamics of the relationship between researcher and subject, they have limited but substantive fiduciary obligations.
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  5.  19
    Précis of Democratic Autonomy.Henry S. Richardson - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 71 (1):187–195.
  6.  17
    Articulating the Moral Community: Toward a Constructive Ethical Pragmatism.Henry S. Richardson - 2018 - New York, US: Oup Usa.
    Henry S. Richardson is Professor of Philosophy at Georgetown University. From 2008-18, he was the editor of Ethics. His previous books include Practical Reasoning about Final Ends, Democratic Autonomy, and Moral Entanglements. He has held fellowships sponsored by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the University Center for Human Values at Princeton University.
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  7.  9
    Moral Entanglements: The Ancillary-Care Obligations of Medical Researchers.Henry S. Richardson - 2012 - Oup Usa.
    The philosopher Henry Richardson's short book is a defense of a position on a neglected topic in medical research ethics. Clinical research ethics has been a longstanding area of study, dating back to the aftermath of the Nazi death-camp doctors and the Tuskegee syphilis study. Most ethical regulations and institutions have developed in response to those past abuses, including the stress on obtaining informed consent from the subject. Richardson points out that that these ethical regulations do not address one of (...)
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  8. Specifying, balancing, and interpreting bioethical principles.Henry S. Richardson - 2000 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (3):285 – 307.
    The notion that it is useful to specify norms progressively in order to resolve doubts about what to do, which I developed initially in a 1990 article, has been only partly assimilated by the bioethics literature. The thought is not just that it is helpful to work with relatively specific norms. It is more than that: specification can replace deductive subsumption and balancing. Here I argue against two versions of reliance on balancing that are prominent in recent bioethical discussions. Without (...)
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  9.  26
    Practical Reasoning About Final Ends.Henry S. Richardson - 1994 - Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.
    Henry Richardson argues that we can determine our ends rationally. He constructs a rich and original theory of how we can reason about our final goals. Richardson defuses the counter-arguments for the limits of rational deliberation, and develops interesting ideas about how his model might be extended to interpersonal deliberation of ends, taking him to the borders of political theory. Along the way Richardson offers illuminating discussions of, inter alia, Aristotle, Aquinas, Sidgwick, and Dewey, as well as the work of (...)
  10. Liberalism, Deliberative Democracy, and “Reasons that All Can Accept”.Henry S. Richardson & James Bohman - 2009 - Journal of Political Philosophy 17 (3):253-274.
  11.  21
    Bioethics: A Return to Fundamentals.Henry S. Richardson, Bernard Gert, Charles M. Culver & K. Danner Clouser - 1999 - Hastings Center Report 29 (5):36.
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  12. Practical Reasoning about Final Ends.Henry Richardson - 1999 - Philosophical Quarterly 49 (195):255-257.
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  13. Practical Reasoning about Final Ends.Henry S. Richardson - 1996 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 58 (4):782-783.
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  14. Moral Reasoning.Henry S. Richardson - 2013 - The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Moral reasoning is individual or collective practical reasoning about what, morally, one ought to do. Philosophical examination of moral reasoning faces both distinctive puzzles — about how we recognize moral considerations and cope with conflicts among them and about how they move us to act — and distinctive opportunities for gleaning insight about what we ought to do from how we reason about what we ought to do.
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  15.  44
    Incidental Findings and Ancillary-Care Obligations.Henry S. Richardson - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):256-270.
    Recent work on incidental fndings, concentrating on the difcult problems posed by the ambiguous results often generated by high-tech medicine, has proceeded largely independently from recent work on medical researchers' ancillary-care obligations, the obligations that researchers have to deal with diseases or conditions besides the one(s) under study. This paper contends that the two topics are morally linked, and specifcally that a sound understanding of ancillary-care obligations will center them on incidental fndings. The paper sets out and defends an understanding (...)
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  16.  29
    Incidental Findings and Ancillary-Care Obligations.Henry S. Richardson - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):256-270.
    This paper explores the convergence of two recent and growing streams of bioethical work and concern. Each has originated independently, but each arises from the fact that the Common Rule that has shaped medical research ethics, as institutionalized in the United States and also abroad, is largely silent about what needs to be done in response to researchers’ positive obligations. One stream concerns what to do about the sometimes vast range of findings that may arise incidentally to performing research procedures. (...)
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  17. Rawlsian social-contract theory and the severely disabled.Henry S. Richardson - 2006 - The Journal of Ethics 10 (4):419-462.
    Martha Nussbaum has powerfully argued in Frontiers ofJustice and elsewhere that John Rawls’s sort of social-contract theory cannot usefully be deployed to deal with issues pertaining to justice for the disabled. To counter this claim, this article deploys Rawls’s sort of social-contract theory in order to deal with issues pertaining to justice for the disabled—or, since, as Nussbaum stresses, we all have some degree of disability—for the severely disabled. In this way, rather than questioning one by one Nussbaum’s interpretive claims (...)
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  18.  19
    Liberalism and the good.R. Bruce Douglass, Gerald M. Mara & Henry S. Richardson (eds.) - 1990 - New York: Routledge.
    A collection of critical essays by English and American scholars, including such controversial academic political theorists as Gutmann, Barry and Nussbaum, that raises questions about the current theoretical reassessment of political liberalism.
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  19.  48
    Beyond Good and Right: Toward a Constructive Ethical Pragmatism.Henry S. Richardson - 1995 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 24 (2):108-141.
  20.  19
    Partial Entrustment in Pragmatic Clinical Trials.Henry S. Richardson & Mildred K. Cho - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (1):24-26.
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  21.  85
    Institutionally Divided Moral Responsibility*: HENRY S. RICHARDSON.Henry S. Richardson - 1999 - Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (2):218-249.
    I am going to be discussing a mode of moral responsibility that anglophone philosophers have largely neglected. It is a type of responsibility that looks to the future rather than the past. Because this forward-looking moral responsibility is relatively unfamiliar in the lexicon of analytic philosophy, many of my locutions will initially strike many readers as odd. As a matter of everyday speech, however, the notion of forward-looking moral responsibility is perfectly familiar. Today, for instance, I said I would be (...)
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  22.  15
    More-Than-Partial Entrustment in Pragmatic Clinical Trials.Henry S. Richardson - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (8):42-45.
    Morain and Largent’s (2023) thorough and thoughtful article concludes that the partial-entrustment model of medical researchers’ ancillary-care obligations (Richardson and Belsky 2004; Belsky and R...
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  23.  50
    Democratic Intentions.Henry S. Richardson - 1997 - Modern Schoolman 74 (4):285-300.
  24. Fair domestic allocation of monkeypox virus countermeasures.Govind Persad, R. J. Leland, Trygve Ottersen, Henry S. Richardson, Carla Saenz, G. Owen Schaefer & Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 2023 - Lancet Public Health 8 (5):e378–e382.
    Countermeasures for mpox (formerly known as monkeypox), primarily vaccines, have been in limited supply in many countries during outbreaks. Equitable allocation of scarce resources during public health emergencies is a complex challenge. Identifying the objectives and core values for the allocation of mpox countermeasures, using those values to provide guidance for priority groups and prioritisation tiers, and optimising allocation implementation are important. The fundamental values for the allocation of mpox countermeasures are: preventing death and illness; reducing the association between death (...)
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  25. Desire and the good in De Anima.Henry Richardson - 1995 [1992] - In Martha Craven Nussbaum & Amélie Rorty (eds.), Essays on Aristotle's De anima. New York: Oxford University Press.
     
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  26.  84
    Degrees of finality and the highest good in Aristotle.Henry S. Richardson - 1992 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 30 (3):327-352.
    This article develops a uniform interpretation of "pursuit for the sake of an end", explaining what an "unqualified final" end (sought solely for its own sake) offers that a (merely) final one does not and providing an improved account of what Aristotle means by an "ultimate end". This interpretation sheds light on (1) the regress argument at the outset of "N.E." I.2, (2) the way Aristotle argues for the existence of a highest good, (3) the special contribution of "self-sufficiency" (autarkeia) (...)
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  27. Republicanism and democratic injustice.Henry S. Richardson - 2006 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 5 (2):175-200.
    A Theory of Freedom and Government has provided a systematic basis for republican theory in the idea of freedom as non-domination. Can a pure republican view, which confines itself to the normative resources thus afforded, adequately address the full range of issues of social justice? This article argues that while there are many sorts of structural injustice with which a pure republican view can well cope, unfair disparities in political influence, of the kind that Rawls labeled failures of the ‘fair (...)
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  28. Satisficing: Not good enough.Henry S. Richardson - 2004 - In Michael Byron (ed.), Satisficing and Maximizing: Moral Theorists on Practical Reason. New York, USA: Cambridge University Press. pp. 106--130.
  29. Discerning subordination and inviolability: A comment on Kamm's intricate ethics.Henry S. Richardson - 2008 - Utilitas 20 (1):81-91.
    Frances Kamm has for some time now been a foremost champion of non-consequentialist ethics. One of her most powerful non-consequentialist themes has been the idea of inviolability. Morality's prohibitions, she argues, confer on persons the status of inviolability. This thought helps articulate a rationale for moral prohibitions that will resist the protean threat posed by the consequentialist argument that anyone should surely be willing to violate a constraint if doing so will minimize the overall number of such violations. As Kamm (...)
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  30.  82
    Moral Entanglements: Ad Hoc Intimacies and Ancillary Duties of Care.Henry S. Richardson - 2012 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (3):376-409.
    This paper develops and explores the idea of moral entanglements: the ways in which, through innocent transactions with others, we can unintendedly accrue special obligations to them. More particularly, the paper explains intimacy-based moral entanglements, to which we become liable by accepting another's waiver of privacy rights. Sometimes, having entered into others' private affairs for innocent or even helpful reasons, one discovers needs of theirs that then become the focus of special duties of care. The general duty to warn them (...)
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  31.  81
    Relying on Experts as We Reason Together.Henry S. Richardson - 2012 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 22 (2):91-110.
    In various contexts, it is thought to be important that we reason together. For instance, an attractive conception of democracy requires that citizens reach lawmaking decisions by reasoning with one another. Reasoning requires that reasoners survey the considerations that they take to be reasons, proceed by a coherent train of thought, and reach conclusions freely. De facto reliance on experts threatens the possibility of collective reasoning by making some reasons collectively unsurveyable, raising questions about the coherence of the resulting train (...)
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  32.  41
    Discerning Subordination and Inviolability: A Comment on Kamm's Intricate Ethics: Henry S. Richardson.Henry S. Richardson - 2008 - Utilitas 20 (1):81-91.
    Frances Kamm has for some time now been a foremost champion of non-consequentialist ethics. One of her most powerful non-consequentialist themes has been the idea of inviolability. Morality's prohibitions, she argues, confer on persons the status of inviolability. This thought helps articulate a rationale for moral prohibitions that will resist the protean threat posed by the consequentialist argument that anyone should surely be willing to violate a constraint if doing so will minimize the overall number of such violations. As Kamm (...)
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  33.  57
    Estlund’s Promising Account of Democratic Authority.Henry S. Richardson - 2011 - Ethics 121 (2):301-334.
    David Estlund’s Democratic Authority develops a novel doctrine of “normative consent,” according to which the nonconsent of those with a duty to consent is null. This article suggests that this doctrine can be defended by confining it to contexts involving consent to an authority, which raise distinctive normative challenges, but argues that Estlund’s attempt to deploy the doctrine fails, for it does not provide convincing reasons to think that citizens have any duty to consent. In closing, the article suggests that (...)
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  34.  22
    Equitable global allocation of monkeypox vaccines.G. Owen Schaefer, Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Caesar A. Atuire, R. J. Leland, Govind Persad, Henry S. Richardson & Carla Saenz - 2023 - Vaccine 41 (48):7084-7088.
    With the world grappling with continued spread of monkeypox internationally, vaccines play a crucial role in mitigating the harms from infection and preventing spread. However, countries with the greatest need - particularly historically endemic countries with the highest monkeypox case-fatality rates - are not able to acquire scarce vaccines. This is unjust, and requires rectification through equitable allocation of vaccines globally. We propose applying the Fair Priority Model for such allocation, which emphasizes three key principles: 1) preventing harm; 2) prioritizing (...)
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  35.  43
    Truth and Ends in Dewey's Pragmatism.Henry S. Richardson - 1998 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 28 (sup1):109-147.
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  36.  10
    Degrees of Finality and the Highest Good in Aristotle.Henry R. Richardson - 1992 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 30 (3):327.
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  37.  18
    The Logical Structure of Sittlichkeit.Henry S. Richardson - 1989 - Idealistic Studies 19 (1):62-78.
    Sittlichkeit seduces: Hegel’s third category of Right, intended to synthesize impartially derived rights with a subjectively centered morality of the good, understandably piques the hopes of his modern readers. How could it not? Sittlichkeit, Ethical Life, holds out the prospect of so much that we still seek. It promises to reconcile welfare and autonomy while guaranteeing concrete content for their product. By combining legal duty with a place for conscience and freedom, it could solve a central problem of politics. Most (...)
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  38.  14
    Philosophy of Rawls: A Collection of Essays.Henry Richardson & Paul Weithman (eds.) - 1999 - Routledge.
    First Published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  39.  38
    Estlund’s Promising Account of Democratic Authority.David Copp, Gerald Gaus, Henry S. Richardson, William A. Edmundson, David Estlund & Edward Slingerland - 2011 - Ethics 121 (2):301-334.
    David Estlund’s Democratic Authority develops a novel doctrine of “normative consent,” according to which the nonconsent of those with a duty to consent is null. This article suggests that this doctrine can be defended by confining it to contexts involving consent to an authority, which raise distinctive normative challenges, but argues that Estlund’s attempt to deploy the doctrine fails, for it does not provide convincing reasons to think that citizens have any duty to consent. In closing, the article suggests that (...)
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  40.  35
    Noncognitivist Trumpism: Partisanship and Political Reasoning.Henry S. Richardson - 2019 - Journal of Social Philosophy 50 (4):642-663.
  41.  43
    The Logical Structure of Sittlichkeit.Henry S. Richardson - 1989 - Idealistic Studies 19 (1):62-78.
    Sittlichkeit seduces: Hegel’s third category of Right, intended to synthesize impartially derived rights with a subjectively centered morality of the good, understandably piques the hopes of his modern readers. How could it not? Sittlichkeit, Ethical Life, holds out the prospect of so much that we still seek. It promises to reconcile welfare and autonomy while guaranteeing concrete content for their product. By combining legal duty with a place for conscience and freedom, it could solve a central problem of politics. Most (...)
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  42. The problem of liberalism and the good.Henry S. Richardson - 1990 - In R. Bruce Douglass, Gerald M. Mara & Henry S. Richardson (eds.), Liberalism and the good. New York: Routledge. pp. 1--28.
     
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  43.  43
    Autonomy's Many Normative Presuppositions.Henry S. Richardson - 2001 - American Philosophical Quarterly 38 (3):287 - 303.
  44.  33
    Our Call: The Constitutive Importance of the People's Judgment.Henry Richardson - 2008 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 5 (1):3-29.
    It is often debated whether what we ought, politically, to do is determined by standards that are independent of any actual political process or whether, by contrast, judgments reached in actual democratic processes have constitutive importance in determining what we should do. This paper argues that this is not an exclusive disjunction and that, consistently with there being independent standards, constitutively authoritative judgments can enter into the truth-conditions pertaining to claims about what we ought, politically, to do. The crucial objection (...)
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  45.  34
    Gewirth: Critical Essays on Action, Rationality, and Community.Anita Allen, Lawrence C. Becker, Deryck Beyleveld, David Cummiskey, David DeGrazia, David M. Gallagher, Alan Gewirth, Virginia Held, Barbara Koziak, Donald Regan, Jeffrey Reiman, Henry Richardson, Beth J. Singer, Michael Slote, Edward Spence & James P. Sterba - 1998 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    As one of the most important ethicists to emerge since the Second World War, Alan Gewirth continues to influence philosophical debates concerning morality. In this ground-breaking book, Gewirth's neo-Kantianism, and the communitarian problems discussed, form a dialogue on the foundation of moral theory. Themes of agent-centered constraints, the formal structure of theories, and the relationship between freedom and duty are examined along with such new perspectives as feminism, the Stoics, and Sartre. Gewirth offers a picture of the philosopher's theory and (...)
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  46.  31
    Editorial: The Devotion and Diversity of the Associate Editors.Henry S. Richardson - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):1-7.
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  47. 10. Neil MacCormick, Practical Reason in Law and Morality Neil MacCormick, Practical Reason in Law and Morality (pp. 192-196).Henry S. Richardson, Cécile Fabre, Joshua Glasgow, Alison Hills, Kieran Setiya & Hallie Rose Liberto - 2004 - In John Hawthorne (ed.), Ethics. Wiley Periodicals.
  48.  18
    Commensurability as a Prerequisite of Rational Choice: An Examination of Sidgwick's Position.Henry S. Richardson - 1991 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 8 (2):181 - 197.
  49.  36
    Announcing an Improvement to the Journal’s Blind Review Process.Henry S. Richardson - 2017 - Ethics 127 (3):519-520.
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  50.  21
    Editorial: Changes at the Journal.Henry S. Richardson - 2016 - Ethics 127 (1):1-5.
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