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Henry E. Allison [79]Henry Allison [10]Henry Edward Allison [1]
  1. Kant's Transcendental Idealism.Henry E. Allison - 1988 - Yale University Press.
    This landmark book is now reissued in a new edition that has been vastly rewritten and updated to respond to recent Kantian literature.
  2. Kant's Theory of Freedom.Henry E. Allison - 1990 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    In his new book the eminent Kant scholar Henry Allison provides an innovative and comprehensive interpretation of Kant's concept of freedom. The author analyzes the concept and discusses the role it plays in Kant's moral philosophy and psychology. He also considers in full detail the critical literature on the subject from Kant's own time to the present day. In the first part Professor Allison argues that at the centre of the Critique of Pure Reason there is the foundation for a (...)
  3. Kant’s Theory of Taste: A Reading of the Critique of Aesthetic Judgment.Henry Allison - 2001 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This book constitutes one of the most important contributions to recent Kant scholarship. In it, one of the pre-eminent interpreters of Kant, Henry Allison, offers a comprehensive, systematic, and philosophically astute account of all aspects of Kant's views on aesthetics. The first part of the book analyses Kant's conception of reflective judgment and its connections with both empirical knowledge and judgments of taste. The second and third parts treat two questions that Allison insists must be kept distinct: the normativity of (...)
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  4.  30
    Kant’s Transcendental Idealism: An Interpretation and Defense.Henry E. Allison - 2004 - Yale University Press.
    This landmark book is now reissued in a new edition that has been vastly rewritten and updated to respond to recent Kantian literature. It includes a new discussion of the Third Analogy, a greatly expanded discussion of Kant’s _Paralogisms, _and entirely new chapters dealing with Kant’s theory of reason, his treatment of theology, and the important Appendix to the Dialectic. _Praise for the earlier edition: _ “Probably the most comprehensive and substantial study of the Critique of Pure Reason written by (...)
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  5.  46
    Kant's Transcendental Deduction: An Analytic-Historical Commentary.Henry E. Allison - 2015 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press UK.
    Henry E. Allison presents an analytical and historical commentary on Kant`s transcendental deduction of the pure concepts of the understanding in the Critique of Pure Reason. He argues that, rather than providing a new solution to an old problem, it addresses a new problem, and he traces the line of thought that led Kant to the recognition of the significance of this problem in his 'pre-critical' period. In addition to the developmental nature of the account of Kant`s views presented here, (...)
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  6.  70
    Idealism and Freedom: Essays on Kant’s Theoretical and Practical Philosophy.Henry E. Allison - 1996 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Henry Allison is one of the foremost interpreters of the philosophy of Kant. This new volume collects all his recent essays on Kant's theoretical and practical philosophy. All the essays postdate Allison's two major books on Kant, and together they constitute an attempt to respond to critics and to clarify, develop and apply some of the central theses of those books. Two are published here for the first time. Special features of the collection are: a detailed defence of the author's (...)
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  7. Kant.Henry E. Allison - 1995 - In Ted Honderich (ed.), The philosophers: introducing great western thinkers. New York: Oxford University Press.
     
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  8.  61
    Kant's Transcendental Idealism: An Interpretation and Defence.Eckart Forster & Henry E. Allison - 1985 - Journal of Philosophy 82 (12):734.
  9.  31
    Kant's Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals: A Commentary.Henry Allison - 2011 - New York, USA: Oxford University Press.
    Henry E. Allison presents a comprehensive commentary on Kant's Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals. Allison pays special attention to the structure of the work and its historical and intellectual context. He argues that, despite its relative brevity, the Groundwork is the single most important work in modern moral philosophy.
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  10. Custom and reason in Hume: a Kantian reading of the first book of the Treatise.Henry E. Allison - 2008 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    So considered, Hume is viewed as a naturalist, whose project in the first three parts of the first book of the Treatise is to provide an account of the ...
  11.  46
    Kant and the Claims of Knowledge.Henry E. Allison - 1989 - Journal of Philosophy 86 (4):214-221.
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  12.  29
    Essays on Kant.Henry E. Allison - 2012 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
    This volume presents seventeen essays by one of the world's leading scholars on Kant. Henry E. Allison explores the nature of transcendental idealism, freedom of the will, and the concept of the purposiveness of nature. He places Kant's views in their historical context and explores their contemporary relevance to present day philosophers.
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  13. Kant’s Antinomy of Teleological Judgment.Henry E. Allison - 1992 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (S1):25-42.
  14.  27
    Kant's Conception of Freedom: A Developmental and Critical Analysis.Henry E. Allison - 2019 - New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
    Although a good deal has been written about Kant's conception of free will in recent years, there has been no serious attempt to examine in detail the development of his views on the topic. This book endeavours to remedy the situation by tracing Kant's thoughts on free will from his earliest discussions of it in the 1750s through to his last accounts in the 1790s. This developmental approach is of interest for at least two reasons. First, it shows that the (...)
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  15.  9
    Kant's Transcendental Idealism.Henry E. Allison - 2006 - In Graham Bird (ed.), A Companion to Kant. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 111–124.
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  16. Morality and freedom: Kant's reciprocity thesis.Henry E. Allison - 1986 - Philosophical Review 95 (3):393-425.
  17.  64
    Kant’s Transcendental Idealism: An Interpretation and Defense; Revised and Enlarged Edition.Henry E. Allison - 2004 - Yale University Press.
    This landmark book is now reissued in a new edition that has been vastly rewritten and updated to respond to recent Kantian literature. It includes a new discussion of the Third Analogy, a greatly expanded discussion of Kant’s _Paralogisms, _and entirely new chapters dealing with Kant’s theory of reason, his treatment of theology, and the important Appendix to the Dialectic. _Praise for the earlier edition: _ “Probably the most comprehensive and substantial study of the Critique of Pure Reason written by (...)
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  18. .Henry Allison - unknown
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  19. On the Very Idea of a Propensity to Evil.Henry E. Allison - 2002 - Journal of Value Inquiry 36 (2-3):337-348.
  20. The non-spatiality of things in themselves for Kant.Henry E. Allison - 1976 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (3):313-321.
  21. Where have all the categories gone? Reflections on Longuenesse's reading of Kant's transcendental deduction.Henry E. Allison - 2000 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 43 (1):67 – 80.
    This paper contains a critical analysis of the interpretation of Kant's second edition version of the Transcendental Deduction offered by Béatrice Longuenesse in her recent book: Kant and the Capacity to Judge. Though agreeing with much of Longuenesse's analysis of the logical function of judgment, I question the way in which she tends to assign them the objectifying role traditionally given to the categories. More particularly, by way of defending my own interpretation of the Deduction against some of her criticisms, (...)
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  22.  66
    On Naturalizing Kant's Transcendental Psychology.Henry E. Allison - 1995 - Dialectica 49 (2‐4):335-356.
  23. Dialogue: Paul Guyer and Henry Allison on Allison's Kant's theory of taste.Paul Guyer & Henry E. Allison - 2006 - In Rebecca Kukla (ed.), Aesthetics and Cognition in Kant's Critical Philosophy. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  24. Transcendental realism, empirical realism and transcendental idealism.Henry E. Allison - 2006 - Kantian Review 11:1-28.
    This essay argues that the key to understanding Kant's transcendental idealism is to understand the transcendental realism with which he contrasts it. It maintains that the latter is not to be identified with a particular metaphysical thesis, but with the assumption that the proper objects of human cognitions are “objects in general” or “as such,” that is, objects considered simply qua objects of some understanding. Since this appears to conflict with Kant's own characterization of transcendental realism as the view that (...)
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  25. Kant on Freedom of the Will.Henry E. Allison - 2006 - In Paul Guyer (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Kant and Modern Philosophy. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 381--415.
     
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  26.  25
    Locke's Theory of Personal Identity: A Re-examination.Henry E. Allison - 1966 - Journal of the History of Ideas 27 (1):41.
  27. Kant's critique of Berkeley.Henry E. Allison - 1973 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 11 (1):43.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Kant's Critique of Berkeley HENRY E. ALLISON THE CLAIMTHAT KANT'S IDEALISM,or at least certain strands of it, is essentially identical to that of Berkeley has a long and distinguished history. It was first voiced by several of Kant's contemporaries such as Mendelssohn, Herder, Hamann, Pistorius and Eberhard who attacked the alleged subjectivism of the Critique of Pure Reason. 1 This viewpoint found its sharpest contemporary expression in the notorious (...)
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  28.  90
    Christianity and Nonsense.Henry E. Allison - 1967 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (3):432 - 460.
    THE Concluding Unscientific Postscript is generally regarded as the most philosophically significant of Kierkegaard's works. In terms of a subjectivistic orientation it seems to present both an elaborate critique of the pretensions of the Hegelian philosophy and an existential analysis which points to the Christian faith as the only solution to the "human predicament." Furthermore, on the basis of such a straightforward reading of the text, Kierkegaard has been both vilified as an irrationalist and praised as a profound existential thinker (...)
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  29.  48
    Kant’s Compatibilism.Henry E. Allison & Hud Hudson - 1996 - Philosophical Review 105 (1):125.
  30.  93
    We Can Act Only under the Idea of Freedom.Henry E. Allison - 1997 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 71 (2):39 - 50.
  31.  8
    Benedict de Spinoza.Henry E. Allison - 1975 - Boston: Twayne Publishers.
  32. Reflections on the Banality of (Radical) Evil.Henry E. Allison - 1995 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 18 (2):141-158.
    In her reply to Gershom Scholem’s criticism of Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil, Hannah Arendt writes.
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  33. Kant’s Refutation of Materialism.Henry E. Allison - 1989 - The Monist 72 (2):190-208.
    In the Critique of Pure Reason, Kant uses the notion of spontaneity to characterize both the ordinary epistemic activity of the understanding and the kind of causal activity required for transcendentally free agency. In spite of the obvious differences between these two conceptions of spontaneity, at one time Kant virtually identified them, since he licensed the inference from the spontaneity of thought manifest in apperception to the transcendental freedom of the thinker. By the mid-1700s, however, he abandoned that view, affirming (...)
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  34. Reply to the comments of Longuenesse and Ginsborg.Henry Allison - 2003 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 46 (2):182 – 194.
    In this discussion I respond to some of the criticisms raised by Béatrice Longuenesse and Hannah Ginsborg to my account of Kant's aesthetic theory presents in Kant's Theory of Taste.
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  35. Kant on freedom: A reply to my critics.Henry E. Allison - 1993 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 36 (4):443 – 464.
    The first two sections of this paper are devoted respectively to the criticisms of my views raised by Stephen Engstrom and Andrews Reath at a symposium on Kant's Theory of Freedom held in Washington D.C. on 28 December 1992 under the auspices of the North American Kant Society. The third section contains my response to the remarks of Marcia Baron at a second symposium in Chicago on 24 April 1993 at the APA Western Division meetings. The fourth section deals with (...)
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  36. On a Presumed Gap in the Derivation of the Categorical Imperative.Henry E. Allison - 1991 - Philosophical Topics 19 (1):1-15.
  37.  78
    Ethics, Evil, and Anthropology in Kant: Remarks on Allen Wood's.Henry E. Allison - 2001 - Ethics 111 (3):594-613.
  38. Debating Allison on Transcendental Idealism.Allen W. Wood, Paul Guyer & Henry E. Allison - 2007 - Kantian Review 12 (2):1-39.
    People talk about rats deserting a sinking ship, but they don't usually ask where the rats go. Perhaps this is only because the answer is so obvious: of course, most of the rats climb aboard the sounder ships, the ships that ride high in the water despite being laden with rich cargoes of cheese and grain and other things rats love, the ships that bring prosperity to ports like eighteenth-century Königsberg and firms such as Green & Motherby. By making the (...)
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  39.  59
    Theoretical Philosophy After 1781.Henry E. Allison, Peter Heath, Gary Hatfield & Michael Friedman (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    This volume, originally published in 2002, assembles the historical sequence of writings that Kant published between 1783 and 1796 to popularize, summarize, amplify and defend the doctrines of his masterpiece, the Critique of Pure Reason of 1781. The best known of them, the Prolegomena, is often recommended to beginning students, but the other texts are also vintage Kant and are important sources for a fully rounded picture of Kant's intellectual development. As with other volumes in the series there are copious (...)
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  40.  5
    Justification and Freedom in the Critique of Practical Reason.Henry E. Allison - 1988 - In Eckart Förster (ed.), Kant’s Transcendental Deductions: The Three ‘Critiques’ and the ‘Opus Postumum’. Stanford University Press. pp. 114-130.
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  41.  52
    “Whatever begins to be must have a cause of existence”: Hume’s Analysis and Kant's Response.Henry E. Allison - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (3):525-546.
  42.  36
    The Gulf Between Nature and Freedom and Nature ’s Guarantee of Perpetual Peace.Henry Allison - 1995 - Proceedings of the Eighth International Kant Congress 1:37-49.
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  43. Apperception and Analyticity in the B-Deduction.Henry E. Allison - 1993 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 44 (1):233-252.
    This paper defends the thesis of the analyticity of the principle of apperception, as developed in the first part of the B-Deduction, against recent criticisms by Paul Guyer and Patricia Kitchen The first part presents these criticisms, the most important of which being that the analyticity thesis is incompatible with both the avowed goal of which being that the Deduction of establishing the validity of the categories and Üie account of apperception in the A-Deduction. The second part argues that Kant's (...)
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  44. Reflective Judgment and the Application of Logic to Nature: Kant's Deduction of the Principle of Purposiveness as an Answer to Hume.Henry E. Allison - 2003 - In Hans-Johann Glock (ed.), Strawson and Kant. New York: Oxford University Press.
  45. Kant’s Conception of Enlightenment.Henry E. Allison - 2000 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 7:35-44.
    Kant’s views on enlightenment are best known through his essay, “What is Enlightenment?” This is, however, merely the first of a series of reflections on the subject contained in the Kantian corpus. In what follows, I shall attempt to provide an overview of the Kantian conception of enlightenment. My major concern is to show that Kant had a complex and nuanced conception of enlightenment, one which is closely connected to some of his deepest philosophical commitments, and is as distinct from (...)
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  46. Kant's Critique of Spinoza.Henry E. Allison - 1980 - In Richard Kennington (ed.), The Philosophy of Baruch Spinoza. Washington: Catholic University of America Press. pp. 199--277.
  47.  49
    Faith and Falsifiability.Henry E. Allison - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 22 (3):499 - 522.
    The falsifiability debate has developed largely in response to a challenge offered in the name of this principle by Antony Flew. His basic contention is that since the assertion of any state of affairs is logically equivalent to a denial of its negation, it must always be possible to designate an actual or possible state of affairs which would "count against" or falsify the original assertion. "And," he concludes, "if there is nothing which a putative assertion denies then there is (...)
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  48.  48
    The Critique of Pure Reason as Transcendental Phenomenology.Henry E. Allison - 1975 - In Don Ihde & Richard M. Zaner (eds.), Dialogues in phenomenology. The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff. pp. 136--155.
  49.  91
    Reflections on the b-deduction.Henry E. Allison - 1987 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 25 (S1):1-15.
  50.  12
    Reason, Revelation, and History in Lessing and Kant.Henry E. Allison - 2010 - In Jürgen Stolzenberg, Fred Rush & Karl P. Ameriks (eds.), Glaube Und Vernunft. / Faith and Reason. De Gruyter. pp. 35-57.
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