Results for 'Heidi M. Feldman'

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  1.  7
    White Matter Plasticity in Reading-Related Pathways Differs in Children Born Preterm and at Term: A Longitudinal Analysis.Lisa Bruckert, Lauren R. Borchers, Cory K. Dodson, Virginia A. Marchman, Katherine E. Travis, Michal Ben-Shachar & Heidi M. Feldman - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 13.
  2.  17
    Heidi M. Hurd.Heidi M. Hurd - 2000 - Legal Theory 6 (4):423-455.
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  3. The Moral Magic of Consent: Heidi M. Hurd.Heidi M. Hurd - 1996 - Legal Theory 2 (2):121-146.
    We regularly wield powers that, upon close scrutiny, appear remarkably magical. By sheer exercise of will, we bring into existence things that have never existed before. With but a nod, we effect the disappearance of things that have long served as barriers to the actions of others. And, by mere resolve, we generate things that pose significant obstacles to others' exercise of liberty. What is the nature of these things that we create and destroy by our mere decision to do (...)
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  4.  19
    Jewish Themes in Spinoza's Philosophy.Heidi M. Ravven & Lenn Evan Goodman (eds.) - 2002 - State University of New York Press.
    CHAPTER 1 Introduction HEIDI M. RAVVEN AND LENN E. GOODMAN The attitudes of Jewish thinkers toward Spinoza have defined a fault line between traditionalist ...
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  5. Moral Combat.Heidi M. Hurd - 2000 - Philosophical Quarterly 50 (200):420-422.
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  6. Notes on Spinoza’s Critique of Aristotle’s Ethics: From Teleology to Process Theory.Heidi M. Ravven - 1989 - Philosophy and Theology 4 (1):3-32.
    I argue that Spinoza’s ethical theory may be viewed as a transformation of Aristotle’s teleological account which has been corrected of several fundamental flaws which Spinoza found in Aristotle. The result of Spinoza’s redefinition of ethical activity is a developmental account of ethics which has close kinship with the views of process theoreticians.
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  7. Heidi M. Hurd.Interpreting Authorities - 1995 - In Andrei Marmor (ed.), Law and Interpretation: Essays in Legal Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 405.
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  8.  34
    Spinoza’s Materialist Ethics: The Education of Desire.Heidi M. Ravven - 1990 - International Studies in Philosophy 22 (3):59-78.
  9. Ethical excellence: philosophers, psychologists, and real-life exemplars show us how to achieve it.Heidi M. Giebel - 2020 - Washington, D.C.: The Catholic University of America Press.
    Combines insights from philosophy, psychology, and the biographies of ordinary people to identify principles to guide our ethical development and provide concrete models for an ethical life.
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  10. Introduction: the things that matter.Heidi M. Giebel - 2018 - In Heidi Marie Giebel (ed.), The things that matter: essays inspired by the later work of Jacques Maritain. American Maritain Association.
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  11. American Legal Thought From Premodernism to Postmodernism: An Intellectual Voyage.Stephen M. Feldman - 2000 - Oxford University Press USA.
    In a little over two hundred years, American legal thought moved from premodernism through modernism and into postmodernism. This book charts that intellectual voyage, stressing both the historical contexts in which ideas unfolded and the inherent force of the ideas themselves.Author Stephen M. Feldman first defines "premodernism," "modernism," and "postmodernism," then explains the development of American legal thought through these three intellectual periods. His narrative revolves around two broad, interrelated themes: jurisprudential foundations and the notion of progress. He points (...)
     
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  12.  6
    Forbidding Intentional Mutilation: Some Unintended Consequences?Heidi M. Giebel - 2007 - International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (4):467-476.
    In a recent IPQ article, Christopher Kaczor gave a promising argument in which he strove to reconcile the common belief that obstetric craniotomy is immoral with his clear and intuitively attractive account of intention. One of Kaczor’s crucial assumptions is that intentional mutilation is morally impermissible. In this article I argue that Kaczor’s analysis has three potential problems: the mutilating features of craniotomy do not appear to meet Kaczor’s criteria for being intended, so his account doesn’t show craniotomy to be (...)
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  13. Ration and activity : Spinoza's biologising of the mind in an Aristotelian key.Heidi M. Ravven - 2018 - In Beth Lord (ed.), Spinoza’s Philosophy of Ratio. Edinburgh University Press.
     
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  14. Spinoza's path from imaginative transindividuality to intuitive relational autonomy : from fusion, confusion and fragmentation to moral integrity.Heidi M. Ravven - 2019 - In Aurelia Armstrong, Keith Green & Andrea Sangiacomo (eds.), Spinoza and Relational Autonomy: Being with Others. Eup.
  15.  23
    The Garden of Eden: Spinoza’s Maimonidean Account of the Genealogy of Morals and the Origin of Society.Heidi M. Ravven - 2001 - Philosophy and Theology 13 (1):3-51.
    Spinoza uses the interpretation of Adam’s disobedience in the Garden of Eden to mount a biblical defense of the life devoted to intellectual pursuits. In his philosophic rereading of the biblical story, Spinoza follows the lead of Maimonides in the Guide to the Perplexed Part I, chapter 2. Both philosophers invoked the biblical text to lend authority to the view that moral consciousness, in contrast with the intellectual, marks a decline in the human condition. This paper explores Spinoza’s dependence on (...)
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  16. This Matter of Abortion.M. Feldman David - 1995 - In Elliot N. Dorff & Louis E. Newman (eds.), Contemporary Jewish Ethics and Morality: A Reader. Oxford University Press. pp. 382.
     
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  17.  7
    Moral Puzzles and Legal Perplexities: Essays on the Influence of Larry Alexander.Heidi M. Hurd (ed.) - 2018 - Cambridge University Press.
    Drawing inspiration from the profoundly influential work of legal theorist Larry Alexander, this volume tackles central questions in criminal law, constitutional law, jurisprudence, and moral philosophy. What are the legitimate conditions of blame and punishment? What values are at the heart of constitutional protections against discrimination or infringements of free speech? Must judges interpret statutes and constitutional provisions in ways that comport with the intentions of those who wrote them? Can the law obligate us to violate the demands of morality, (...)
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  18. Maimonides Non-Kantian Moral Psychology: Maimonides and Kant on the Garden of Eden and the Genealogy of Morals.Heidi M. Ravven - 2012 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 20 (2):199-216.
    Both Immanuel Kant and Moses Maimonides wrote lengthy treatments of the biblical garden of Eden. For both philosophers the biblical story served as an opportunity to address the genealogy of morals. I argue here that the two treatments offer deep insights into their respective philosophical anthropologies, that is to say, into their assessments of the human person and of moral psychology. Contrary to much that has been written about Maimonides as a proto-Kantian, I expose the profoundly different and even opposed (...)
     
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  19.  19
    Moral Rights and Legal Rules: A Natural Law Theory,”.Heidi M. Hurd - 2000 - Legal Theory ( 6:2000.
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  20.  74
    Has Hegel Anything to Say to Feminists?Heidi M. Ravven - 1988 - The Owl of Minerva 19 (2):149-168.
    In this paper I argue that the Hegelian philosophy offers insights that are particularly important for feminists: 1) a descriptive analysis of the historic family as a social system whose inherent oppressiveness needs to be transcended; and 2) a model of intrapsychic and social liberation and harmony as precisely the true path of emergence from and rational transformation of the family. Although a clear advocate of the traditional bourgeois family, Hegel, perhaps paradoxically, also took a critical posture toward the family, (...)
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  21. Living with Genius.Heidi M. Hurd - 2016 - In Kimberly Kessler Ferzan & Stephen J. Morse (eds.), Legal, Moral, and Metaphysical Truths: The Philosophy of Michael S. Moore. Oxford University Press UK.
    This chapter synthesizes Michael Moore’s scholarly opus, organizing the breathtaking array of topics that he has tackled, restating the field-changing theses that he has defended, and extracting a set of common themes that define the essential components of his intellectual legacy. Along the way, it draws upon personal experiences in Michael’s life that may have influenced his scholarly choices. On pain of committing the genetic fallacy, the piece does not purport either to bolster or to debunk any of his claims (...)
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  22. What's wrong with alienation?Heidi M. Silcox - 2010 - Philosophy and Literature 34 (1):pp. 131-144.
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  23.  52
    Spinoza’s Materialist Ethics: The Education of Desire.Heidi M. Ravven - 1990 - International Studies in Philosophy 22 (3):59-78.
  24.  6
    Ultrasound Viewers’ Attribution of Moral Status to Fetal Humans: A Case for Presumptive Rationality.Heidi M. Giebel - 2020 - Diametros:1-14.
    As several studies, along with a book and movie depicting the true story of a former clinic director, have recently brought to the public’s attention, fetal ultrasound images dramatically impact some viewers’ normative judgments: a small but non-negligible proportion of viewers attribute increased moral status to fetal humans and even form the belief that abortion is impermissible. I consider three types of psychological explanation for a viewer’s shift in beliefs: increased bonding or empathy, various forms of cognitive bias, and type (...)
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  25.  45
    Liberty in Law.Heidi M. Hurd - 2002 - Law and Philosophy 21 (4):385-465.
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  26. Why liberals should hate ``hate crime legislation''.Heidi M. Hurd - 2001 - Law and Philosophy 20 (2):215 - 232.
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  27.  35
    Free Will Skepticism: Current Arguments and Future Directions. [REVIEW]Heidi M. Ravven - 2014 - Neuroethics 7 (3):383-386.
    Offered here is a review of Gregg D. Caruso’s edited volume, Exploring the Illusion of Free will and Moral Responsibility [1]. Assembled here are essays by nearly all the major contributors to the philosophical free will debate on the denial and skeptical side. The volume tells us where the field currently is and also gives us a sense of how the free will debate is actually advancing toward greater understanding. Perhaps we can even discern some glimmer of hope for a (...)
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  28.  21
    Why Liberals Should Hate "Hate Crime Legislation".Heidi M. Hurd - 2001 - Law and Philosophy 20 (2):215-232.
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  29.  99
    Some Thoughts on What Spinoza Learned from Maimonides about the Prophetic Imagination Part 1..Heidi M. Ravven - 2001 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (2):193.
  30.  22
    Is it wrong to do right when others do wrong? A critique of american tort law.Heidi M. Hurd - 2001 - Legal Theory 7 (3):307-340.
  31.  75
    Some Thoughts on What Spinoza Learned from Maimonides on the Prophetic Imagination Part Two...Heidi M. Ravven - 2001 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (3):385.
  32.  47
    Hegel’s Epistemic Turn—Or Spinoza’s?Heidi M. Ravven - 2003 - Idealistic Studies 33 (2/3):195-202.
    This paper takes issue with Slavoj Zizek's constructed opposition between Spinoza and Hegel. Where Zizek views Hegel's non-dualistic relational epistemology as a substantial improvement over Spinoza's purported dogmatic account of a reality which is external to the perceiver, I argue that Hegel inherited such an epistemology from Spinoza. Ultimately, it is Spinoza who provides Hegel with the conceptual tools for knowledge of the "transphenomenal" within the context of human finitude.
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  33.  35
    Some Hegelian Phenomenological and Philosophical Comments on the Liturgy for the Days of Awe.Heidi M. Ravven - 1986 - The Owl of Minerva 18 (1):57-66.
  34.  41
    A Response to James Pinkerton.Heidi M. Ravven - 1994 - The Owl of Minerva 26 (1):101-102.
    In his comments on the film version of Schindler’s List, James B. Pinkerton, writing in New York Newsday, blames Hegel - and Hegel above all others - for Nazism. He charges Hegel with undermining “the last bulwark of liberty and safety we have in a world populated by the imperfect: the rule of law.” Pinkerton further suggests, “One can perhaps build a respectable ideology out of a Hegelianism … but it’s much easier to just write ‘totalitarianism’ on such a political (...)
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  35.  37
    Wertsetzung als Implikation der Erzählhaltung. Bemerkungen zur Judendarstellung im Jurek Beckers Romanen.Heidi M. Müller - 1986 - Philosophica 38 (2):61-76.
  36.  7
    Spinoza’s Ethics of ratio: discovering and applying a spinozan model of human nature.Heidi M. Ravven - 2020 - Ethics and Education 15 (2):232-246.
    ABSTRACTI argue that Spinoza attributes to society the role of moral educator, a role that is to be carried out via Religion and Politics and hence also via an educational system. In his account, the social body is given the task of applying and transmitting a notion of virtue whose criterion is enhanced freedom, yet that freedom paradoxically must be acquired initially via authoritative coercive rules of praxis. The aim is to achieve an infinite broadening of perspective upon oneself and (...)
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  37.  54
    A Response to “Why Feminists Should Take the Phenomenology of Spirit Seriously”.Heidi M. Ravven - 1992 - The Owl of Minerva 24 (1):63-69.
    Stuart Swindle in “Why Feminists Should Take the Phenomenology of Spirit Seriously” accuses me of failing to interpret the passages in the Phenomenology on the family and women in the full context of the progress to absolute spirit. He gives no particular evidence for this claim, but merely asserts it repeatedly and at an ever increasing decibel level. To this general criticism I assert that nothing that I wrote in “Has Hegel Anything to Say to Feminists?” denied that spirit progresses (...)
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  38.  25
    On Why and How Intention Matters.Heidi M. Giebel - 2015 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 89 (3):369-395.
    While our common sense seems to tell us that intention matters to ethical evaluation, there is considerable disagreement among ethicists regarding why and how it matters. In this article I argue that intention matters to act evaluation in much the way that the principle of double effect implies. First, I identify five propositions—one epistemological and four ethical—that the proponent of PDE holds regarding the ethical relevance of intention. Second, I give two general arguments for the ethical relevance of intention. Third, (...)
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  39.  6
    Putting Free Will in Cultural Context and Beyond.Heidi M. Ravven - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (2):1-2.
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  40.  51
    The Garden of Eden: Spinoza’s Maimonidean Account of the Genealogy of Morals and the Origin of Society.Heidi M. Ravven - 2001 - Philosophy and Theology 13 (1):3-51.
    Spinoza uses the interpretation of Adam’s disobedience in the Garden of Eden to mount a biblical defense of the life devoted to intellectual pursuits. In his philosophic rereading of the biblical story, Spinoza follows the lead of Maimonides in the Guide to the Perplexed Part I, chapter 2. Both philosophers invoked the biblical text to lend authority to the view that moral consciousness, in contrast with the intellectual, marks a decline in the human condition. This paper explores Spinoza’s dependence on (...)
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  41.  23
    Untying the gordian knot of mens Rea requirements for accomplices.Heidi M. Hurd & Michael S. Moore - 2016 - Social Philosophy and Policy 32 (2):161-183.
    :This essay undertakes two tasks: first, to describe the differing mens rea requirements for accomplice liability of both Anglo-American common law and the American Law Institute's Model Penal Code; and second, to recommend how the mens rea requirements of both of these two sources of criminal law in America should be amended so as to satisfy the goals of clarity and consistency and so as to more closely conform the criminal law to the requirements of moral blameworthiness. Three "pure models" (...)
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  42.  13
    The Ethical Implications of Proportioning Punishment to Deontological Desert.Heidi M. Hurd & Michael S. Moore - 2021 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 15 (3):495-514.
    This article details the degree to which the ideal of punishment proportional to desert forces changes in how we think of deontological morality. More specifically, the proportionality ideal forces us to abandon the simple, text-like view of deontological moral norms, and it forces us to acknowledge that those norms are not uniformly categorical in their force.
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  43.  47
    Introduction Symposium on Crime and Culpability.Heidi M. Hurd - 2010 - Law and Philosophy 29 (4):371-372.
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  44.  16
    Book Reviews Edlin, Douglas E. Judges and Unjust Laws: Common Law Constitutionalism and the Foundations of Judicial Review . Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2009. Pp. 321. $65.00 (cloth). [REVIEW]Heidi M. Hurd - 2009 - Ethics 120 (1):165-170.
  45.  25
    Forbidding intentional mutilation: Some unintended consequences?Heidi M. Giebel - 2007 - International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (4):467-476.
    In a recent IPQ article, Christopher Kaczor gave a promising argument in which he strove to reconcile the common belief that obstetric craniotomy (the crushing of nearlyborn fetuses’ heads) is immoral with his clear and intuitively attractive account of intention. One of Kaczor’s crucial assumptions is that intentional mutilation is morally impermissible. In this article I argue that Kaczor’s analysis has three potential problems: (1) the mutilating features of craniotomy do not appear to meet Kaczor’s criteria for being intended, so (...)
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  46.  26
    Judaism and Enlightenment (review).Heidi M. Ravven - 2004 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (3):343-345.
  47.  29
    Paternalism On Pain of Punishment.Heidi M. Hurd - 2009 - Criminal Justice Ethics 28 (1):49-73.
    “We overpunish and overcriminalize,” Douglas Husak insists in his latest book-length tour de force entitled Overcriminalization: The Limits of the Criminal Law.1 In what ways and by what mea...
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  48.  26
    Letting Compassion Open the Door: Battered Women's Disclosure to Medical Providers.Heidi M. Bauer & Michael A. Rodriguez - 1995 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (4):459.
    Domestic violence is an important social problem that strongly impacts the healthcare system. It is estimated that two to four million women are physically abused each year by their husbands, ex-husbands, or boyfriends. Many of these abused women enter the medical system as patients with physical injuries, somatic symptoms, or psychiatric problems. These patients represent a large proportion of women patients in a variety of clinical settings: 22–35% of women presenting to emergency departments, up to 37% of obstetric patients, and (...)
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  49.  5
    Crimes Against Animals.Heidi M. Hurd - 2019 - In Larry Alexander & Kimberly Kessler Ferzan (eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of Applied Ethics and the Criminal Law. Springer Verlag. pp. 71-93.
    Criminal provisions governing the treatment of animals collectively embody inconsistencies that reflect deep-seated ambivalence about who counts as the victim of animal cruelty, what constitutes the wrong of such cruelty, and what role punishment ought to play in response to it. In the first part, I shall sketch how animal cruelty laws embody tensions and contradictions that make manifest the criminal law’s need for philosophical clarity. In the second part, I shall argue that one way to bring a modicum of (...)
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  50.  2
    4. Fouling Our Nest: Is Ethics Impotent against Economics?Heidi M. Hurd - 2015 - In Roger T. Ames Peter D. Hershock (ed.), Value and Values: Economics and Justice in an Age of Global Interdependence. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 82-108.
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