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  1.  36
    Arguing About Desirable Consequences: What Constitutes a Convincing Argument?Hans Hoeken, Rian Timmers & Peter Jan Schellens - 2012 - Thinking and Reasoning 18 (3):394 - 416.
    Argument quality has consistently been shown to have strong and lasting persuasive effects. The question is what criteria people use to distinguish strong from weak arguments and how these criteria relate to the ones proposed in normative argumentation theory. In an experiment 235 participants without training in argumentation theory rated the acceptance of 30 claims about the desirability of a consequence that were supported by either an argument from analogy, from authority, or from consequences. The supporting arguments were systematically manipulated (...)
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  2.  5
    Evoking and Measuring Identification with Narrative Characters – A Linguistic Cues Framework.Kobie van Krieken, Hans Hoeken & José Sanders - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
  3.  28
    Arguing About the Likelihood of Consequences: Laypeople's Criteria to Distinguish Strong Arguments From Weak Ones.Hans Hoeken, Ester Šorm & Peter Jan Schellens - 2014 - Thinking and Reasoning 20 (1):77-98.
    High-quality arguments have strong and lasting persuasive effects, suggesting that people can distinguish high- from low-quality arguments. However, we know little of what norms people employ to make that distinction. Some studies have shown that, in evaluating arguments from consequences, people are more sensitive to differences with respect to the desirability of these consequences than to differences in the likelihood that these consequences will occur. This raises the question of whether people lack the criteria to distinguish high-quality from low-quality arguments (...)
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  4. Anecdotal, Statistical, and Causal Evidence: Their Perceived and Actual Persuasiveness.Hans Hoeken - 2001 - Argumentation 15 (4):425-437.
    Claims about the occurrence of future events play an important role in pragmatic argumentation. Such claims can be supported by inductive arguments employing anecdotal, statistical, or causal evidence. In an experiment, the actual and perceived persuasiveness of these three types of evidence were assessed. A total of 324 participants read a newspaper article in which it was claimed that the building of a cultural centre would be profitable. This claim was supported by either anecdotal, statistical or causal evidence. The statistical (...)
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  5.  11
    Laypeople’s Evaluation of Arguments: Are Criteria for Argument Quality Scheme-Specific?Peter Jan Schellens, Ester Šorm, Rian Timmers & Hans Hoeken - 2017 - Argumentation 31 (4):681-703.
    Can argumentation schemes play a part in the critical processing of argumentation by lay people? In a qualitative study, participants were invited to come up with strong and weak arguments for a given claim and were subsequently interviewed for why they thought the strong argument was stronger than the weak one. Next, they were presented with a list of arguments and asked to rank these arguments from strongest to weakest, upon which they were asked to motivate their judgments in an (...)
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  6.  16
    The Role of Dimensions of Narrative Engagement in Narrative Persuasion.Hans Beentjes, José Sanders, Hans Hoeken & Anneke de Graaf - 2009 - Communications 34 (4):385-405.
    Several models of narrative persuasion posit that a reader's phenomenological experience of a narrative plays a mediating role in the persuasive effects of the narrative. Because the narrative reading experience is multi-dimensional, this experiment investigates which dimensions of this experience – referred to here as narrative engagement – mediate between reading a story and the persuasive effects of the story. Narrative engagement was manipulated by giving participants a selection task to carry out while reading or by adding language errors to (...)
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  7.  8
    Conducting Experiments on Cultural Aspects of Document Design: Why and How?Hubert Korzilius & Hans Hoeken - 2003 - Communications 28 (3):285-304.
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  8.  2
    Problem-Solution Structures in Persuasive Texts: Effects on Attention, Comprehension, and Yielding.Hans Hoeken - 1998 - Communications 23 (1):61-82.
  9.  1
    Facts or Feelings: The Persuasive Efffects of the Conceptual and Afffective Meaning of Adjectives Im Coherent Texts.Hans Hoeken - 1996 - Communications 21 (3):257-272.
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