Results for 'Hannah Fagen'

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  1. Understanding the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative: A Multidisciplinary Analysis.Erica Preston-Roedder, Hannah Fagen, Jessica Martucci & Anne Barnhill - 2019 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 12 (2):117-147.
    In the United States, roughly 1 out of 4 births takes place at a hospital certified as Baby-Friendly. This paper offers a multi-disciplinary perspective on the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI), including empirical, normative, and historical perspectives. Our analysis is novel in that we trace how medical practices of “quality improvement,” which initially appear to have little to do with breastfeeding, may have shaped the BFHI. Ultimately, we demonstrate that a rich understanding of the BFHI can be obtained by tracing how (...)
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  2.  51
    Hannah Arendt/Karl Jaspers Correspondence, 1926-1969.Hannah Arendt & Karl Jaspers - 1992 - Houghton Mifflin.
    The correspondence between Hannah Arendt and Karl Jaspers begins in 1926, when the twenty-year-old Arendt studied philosophy with Jaspers in Heidelberg. It is interrupted by Arendt's emigration and Jasper's 'inner emigration' and resumes in the fall of 1945. From then until Jaspers's death in 1969, the initial teacher-student relationship develops into a close friendship. Three countries figure prominently in the correspondence: Germany, Israel, and the United States. Among the topics are Fascism, the atom bomb and the threat of global (...)
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  3. I—Hannah Ginsborg: Meaning, Understanding and Normativity.Hannah Ginsborg - 2012 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 86 (1):127-146.
    I defend the normativity of meaning against recent objections by arguing for a new interpretation of the ‘ought’ relevant to meaning. Both critics and defenders of the normativity thesis have understood statements about how an expression ought to be used as either prescriptive or semantic. I propose an alternative view of the ‘ought’ as conveying the primitively normative attitudes speakers must adopt towards their uses if they are to use the expression with understanding.
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  4. The portable Hannah Arendt.Hannah Arendt - 2000 - New York: Penguin Books. Edited by Peter Baehr.
    Although Hannah Arendt is considered one of the major contributors to social and political thought in the twentieth century, this is the first general anthology ...
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  5.  35
    Epigenesis and culture.Robert Fagen - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):10-10.
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    Skill and flexibility in animal play behavior.Robert Fagen - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):162-162.
  7.  18
    Hannah Arendt: the last interview and other conversations.Hannah Arendt - 2013 - Brooklyn, NY: Melville House.
    A unique selection of the most significant interviews given by Hannah Arendt, including the last she gave before her death in 1975. Some are published here in English for the first time. Arendt was one of the most important thinkers of her time, famous for her idea of "the banality of evil" which continues to provoke debate. This collection provides new and startling insight into Arendt's thoughts about Watergate and the nature of American politics, about totalitarianism and history, and (...)
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  8.  12
    Moving beyond words.Robert Fagen - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):275-276.
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  9. Sobre Hannah Arendt.Hannah Arendt - 2010 - Revista Inquietude 1 (2):122-163.
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  10.  17
    Hannah Arendt, Karl Jaspers: Briefwechsel 1926-1969.Hannah Arendt, Karl Jaspers & Lotte Köhler - 1985
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  11.  35
    Part VIII Hannah Arendt.Hannah Arendt - 2002 - In Tim Mooney & Dermot Moran (eds.), The Phenomenology Reader. New York: Routledge. pp. 339.
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  12. Between past and future.Hannah Arendt - 1961 - New York,: Viking Press.
    In this book she describes the perplexing crises which modern society faces as a result of the loss of meaning of the traditional key words of politics: justice ...
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  13. Lectures on Kant’s Political Philosophy.Hannah Arendt - 1982 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Edited by Ronald Beiner.
    The present volume brings Arendt's notes for these lectures together with other of her texts on the topic of judging and provides important clues to the likely direction of Arendt's thinking in this area.
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  14.  44
    The Normativity of Nature: Essays on Kant's Critique of Judgment.Hannah Ginsborg - 2014 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
    Hannah Ginsborg presents fourteen essays which establish Kant's Critique of Judgment as a central contribution to the understanding of human cognition. The papers bring out the significance of Kant's philosophical notion of judgment, and use it to address interpretive issues in Kant's aesthetics, theory of knowledge, and philosophy of biology.
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  15.  12
    The correspondence of Hannah Arendt and Gershom Scholem.Hannah Arendt - 2017 - London: University of Chicago Press. Edited by Gershom Scholem, Marie Luise Knott & Anthony David.
    The essence of the correspondence between Arendt and Scholem can be said to lie in three things. Above all it provides an intimate account of how two great intellectuals try to come to terms with being both German and Jewish, and how to think about Germany before, during, and after the Holocaust. They also debate the issue of what it means to be Jewish in the post-Holocaust world whether in New York or in Jerusalem. Finally, the specter of Benjamin haunts (...)
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  16.  26
    The life of the mind.Hannah Arendt - 1981 - New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.
    Discusses the nature of thought and volition, examines past philosophical theories, and clarifies the relation between will and freedom.
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  17.  11
    Minḥah le-Ḥanah: sefer ha-yovel li-khevod Ḥanah Kasher = A tribute to Hannah: jubilee book in honor of Hannah Kasher.Hannah Kasher, Avi Elqayam & Ariel Malachi (eds.) - 2018 - Tel Aviv: Idra.
  18.  72
    The regulation of cognitive enhancement devices : extending the medical model.Hannah Maslen, Thomas Douglas, Roi Cohen Kadosh, Neil Levy & Julian Savulescu - 2014 - Journal of Law and the Biosciences 1 (1):68-93.
    This article presents a model for regulating cognitive enhancement devices. Recently, it has become very easy for individuals to purchase devices which directly modulate brain function. For example, transcranial direct current stimulators are increasingly being produced and marketed online as devices for cognitive enhancement. Despite posing risks in a similar way to medical devices, devices that do not make any therapeutic claims do not have to meet anything more than basic product safety standards. We present the case for extending existing (...)
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  19.  17
    Judith Butler’s post-Hegelian ethics and the problem with recognition.Hannah Stark - 2014 - Feminist Theory 15 (1):89-100.
    Judith Butler’s recent work is exemplary of the trend in contemporary theory to consider ethics. Her deliberation over ethical questions, and the place of ethics in intellectual work, has undeniably intensified since September 11. This article will demonstrate, however, that this is a rendering explicit of what has always been implicit in her work. Rather than perceiving the ethical dimension of Butler’s writings in her increasing interest in thinkers such as Emmanuel Levinas and Hannah Arendt, I contend that it (...)
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  20.  11
    Die Sorge um sich--die Sorge um die Welt: Martin Heidegger, Michel Foucault und Hannah Arendt.Hannah Holme - 2018 - Frankfurt: Campus Verlag.
    Auf den ersten Blick haben Hannah Arendt und Michel Foucault kaum etwas gemein. Tatsächlich beziehen sie sich jedoch auf die identischen Topoi der Philosophiegeschichte - wenn ihre Auslegungen der Quellen auch denkbar verschieden sind. Als Grund hierfür bestimmt Hannah Holme die komplementären Perspektiven der beiden, die sie als Aneignungen des heideggerschen Sorgebegriffs deutet: die ethische Sorge um sich Foucaults und die politische Sorge um die Welt Arendts. Am Ende steht ein Plädoyer für eine Verbindung des machtkritischen Ethos der (...)
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  21. Going on as one ought: Kripke and Wittgenstein on the normativity of meaning.Hannah Ginsborg - 2022 - Mind and Language 37 (5):876-892.
    Kripke’s thesis that meaning is normative is typically interpreted, following Boghossian, as the thesis that meaningful expressions allow of true or warranted use. I argue for an alternative interpretation centered on Wittgenstein’s conception of the normativity involved in “knowing how to go on” in one’s use of an expression. Meaning is normative for Kripke because it justifies claims, not to be saying something true, but to be going on as one ought from prevous uses of the expression. I argue that (...)
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  22. Hypercrisy and standing to self-blame.Hannah Tierney - 2021 - Analysis 81 (2):262-269.
    In a 2020 article in Analysis, Lippert-Rasmussen argues that the moral equality account of the hypocrite’s lack of standing to blame fails. To object to this account, Lippert-Rasmussen considers the contrary of hypocrisy: hypercrisy. In this article, I show that if hypercrisy is a problem for the moral equality account, it is also a problem for Lippert-Rasmussen’s own account of why hypocrites lack standing to blame. I then reflect on the hypocrite’s and hypercrite’s standing to self-blame, which reveals that the (...)
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  23.  92
    A typology of empathy and its many moral forms.Hannah Read - 2019 - Philosophy Compass 14 (10):e12623.
    Debates about empathy's role in morality are notoriously complex. On the one hand, proponents of empathy argue that it plays a crucial role in the process of making moral judgments, moral motivation, moral development, and the cultivation of meaningful personal relationships. On the other hand, critics of empathy warn that it is especially susceptible to a number of morally troubling biases and motivational shortcomings. Yet there is little consensus about what empathy is or what it might be good for from (...)
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  24.  71
    Do-it-yourself brain stimulation: a regulatory model.Hannah Maslen, Tom Douglas, Roi Cohen Kadosh, Neil Levy & Julian Savulescu - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (5):413-414.
  25. Responsibility and judgment.Hannah Arendt - 2003 - New York: Schocken Books. Edited by Jerome Kohn.
    Each of the books that Hannah Arendt published in her lifetime was unique, and to this day each continues to provoke fresh thought and interpretations. This was never more true than for Eichmann in Jerusalem, her account of the trial of Adolf Eichmann, where she first used the phrase “the banality of evil.” Her consternation over how a man who was neither a monster nor a demon could nevertheless be an agent of the most extreme evil evoked derision, outrage, (...)
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  26. The human condition [selections].Hannah Arendt - 2013 - In Timothy C. Campbell & Adam Sitze (eds.), Biopolitics: A Reader. Durham: Duke University Press.
  27.  38
    The Human Condition: Second Edition.Hannah Arendt & Margaret Canovan - 1998 - University of Chicago Press.
    A work of striking originality bursting with unexpected insights, _The Human Condition_ is in many respects more relevant now than when it first appeared in 1958. In her study of the state of modern humanity, Hannah Arendt considers humankind from the perspective of the actions of which it is capable. The problems Arendt identified then—diminishing human agency and political freedom, the paradox that as human powers increase through technological and humanistic inquiry, we are less equipped to control the consequences (...)
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  28.  26
    Advancing understanding of executive function impairments and psychopathology: bridging the gap between clinical and cognitive approaches.Hannah R. Snyder, Akira Miyake & Benjamin L. Hankin - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  29. Critique of the Power of Judgment.Hannah Ginsborg, Immanuel Kant, Paul Guyer & Eric Matthews - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (3):429.
    This new translation is an extremely welcome addition to the continuing Cambridge Edition of Kant’s works. English-speaking readers of the third Critique have long been hampered by the lack of an adequate translation of this important and difficult work. James Creed Meredith’s much-reprinted translation has charm and elegance, but it is often too loose to be useful for scholarly purposes. Moreover it does not include the first version of Kant’s introduction, the so-called “First Introduction,” which is now recognized as indispensable (...)
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  30. Walter Benjamin 1892-1940.Hannah Arendt - 2008 - Kronos - metafizyka, kultura, religia 4 (4):340-340.
  31. Reasons for Belief.Hannah Ginsborg - 2006 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (2):286 - 318.
    Davidson claims that nothing can count as a reason for a belief except another belief. This claim is challenged by McDowell, who holds that perceptual experiences can count as reasons for beliefs. I argue that McDowell fails to take account of a distinction between two different senses in which something can count as a reason for belief. While a non-doxastic experience can count as a reason for belief in one of the two senses, this is not the sense which is (...)
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  32. Praiseworthiness and Motivational Enhancement: ‘No Pain, No Praise’?Hannah Maslen, Julian Savulescu & Carin Hunt - 2020 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 98 (2):304-318.
    The view that exertion of effort determines praiseworthiness for an achievement is implicit in ‘no pain, no praise’-style objections to biomedical enhancement. On such views, if enhancements were t...
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  33. Kant on understanding organisms as natural purposes.Hannah Ginsborg - 2001 - In Eric Watkins (ed.), Kant and the Sciences. New York, US: Oxford University Press. pp. 231--58.
  34.  31
    The Debate over Inclusive Fitness as a Debate over Methodologies.Hannah Rubin - 2018 - Philosophy of Science 85 (1):1-30.
    This article analyzes the recent debate surrounding inclusive fitness and argues that certain limitations ascribed to it by critics—such as requiring weak selection or providing dynamically insufficient models—are better thought of as limitations of the methodological framework most often used with inclusive fitness. In support of this, I show how inclusive fitness can be used with the replicator dynamics. I conclude that much of the debate is best understood as being about the orthogonal issue of using abstract versus idealized models.
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  35. The Ethics of Deep Brain Stimulation for the Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa.Hannah Maslen, Jonathan Pugh & Julian Savulescu - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (3):215-230.
    There is preliminary evidence, from case reports and investigational studies, to suggest that Deep Brain Stimulation could be used to treat some patients with Anorexia Nervosa. Although this research is at an early stage, the invasive nature of the intervention and the vulnerability of the potential patients are such that anticipatory ethical analysis is warranted. In this paper, we first show how different treatment mechanisms raise different philosophical and ethical questions. We distinguish three potential mechanisms alluded to in the neuroscientific (...)
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  36. Kant and the Problem of Experience.Hannah Ginsborg - 2006 - Philosophical Topics 34 (1-2):59-106.
    As most of its readers are aware, the Critique of Pure Reason is primarily concerned not with empirical, but with a priori knowledge. For the most part, the Kant of the first Critique tends to assume that experience, and the knowledge that is based on it, is unproblematic. The problem with which he is concerned is that of how we can be capable of substantive knowledge independently of experience. At the same time, however, the notion of experience plays a crucial (...)
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  37.  77
    Empathy and Common Ground.Hannah Read - 2021 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 24 (2):459-473.
    Critics of empathy—the capacity to share the mental lives of others—have charged that empathy is intrinsically biased. It occurs between no more than two people, and its key function is arguably to coordinate and align feelings, thoughts, and responses between those who are often already in close personal relationships. Because of this, critics claim that empathy is morally unnecessary at best and morally harmful at worst. This paper argues, however, that it is precisely because of its ability to connect people (...)
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  38. Kant's Biological Teleology and Its Philosophical Significance.Hannah Ginsborg - 2006 - In Graham Bird (ed.), A Companion to Kant. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 455–469.
    The article surveys Kant’s treatment of biological teleology in the ’Critique of Judgment’, with special attention to the question of whether the notion of natural teleology is coherent. It argues that our entitlement to regard nature as teleological is not established by the argument of the ’Antinomy’, but rather results from our entitlement to regard the workings of our own cognitive faculties in normative terms. This implies a view of the relation between biological teleology and the representational character of mind (...)
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  39.  27
    Ethical Management in the Hotel Sector: Creating an Authentic Work Experience for Workers with Intellectual Disabilities.Hannah Meacham, Jillian Cavanagh, Timothy Bartram & Jennifer Laing - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (3):823-835.
    The study examines the employment experience of workers with intellectual disability in the hotel sector in Australia. Through a qualitative case study, we interviewed managers and WWID, and held focus groups with supervisors and colleagues at three hotels. We have used the theoretical framework of corporate social responsibility to investigate HR practices that create an ethical climate which promote authentic work experiences for WWID. The study found that participative work practices provide evidence of how WWID fit in at the workplace. (...)
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  40. Collective responsibility.Hannah Arendt - 1987 - In James William Bernauer (ed.), Amor mundi: explorations in the faith and thought of Hannah Arendt. Hingham, MA: distributors for the U.S. and Canada Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  41.  14
    Antibiotic Resistance and the Biology of History.Hannah Landecker - 2016 - Body and Society 22 (4):19-52.
    Beginning in the 1940s, mass production of antibiotics involved the industrial-scale growth of microorganisms to harvest their metabolic products. Unfortunately, the use of antibiotics selects for resistance at answering scale. The turn to the study of antibiotic resistance in microbiology and medicine is examined, focusing on the realization that individual therapies targeted at single pathogens in individual bodies are environmental events affecting bacterial evolution far beyond bodies. In turning to biological manifestations of antibiotic use, sciences fathom material outcomes of their (...)
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  42.  50
    Love and Saint Augustine.Hannah Arendt - 1996 - University of Chicago Press.
    Here is a completely corrected and revised English translation that incorporates Arendt's own substantial revisions and provides additional notes based on letters, contracts, and other documents.
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  43. Wittgenstein on Going On.Hannah Ginsborg - 2020 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 50 (1):1-17.
    In a famous passage from the Philosophical Investigations, Wittgenstein describes a pupil who has been learning to write out various sequences of numbers in response to orders such as “+1” and “+2”. He has shown himself competent for numbers up to 1000, but when we have him continue the “+2” sequence beyond 1000, he writes the numerals 1004, 1008, 1012. As Wittgenstein describes the case: We say to him, “Look what you’re doing!” — He doesn’t understand us. We say “You (...)
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  44. Was Kant a nonconceptualist?Hannah Ginsborg - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 137 (1):65 - 77.
    I criticize recent nonconceptualist readings of Kant’s account of perception on the grounds that the strategy of the Deduction requires that understanding be involved in the synthesis of imagination responsible for the intentionality of perceptual experience. I offer an interpretation of the role of understanding in perceptual experience as the consciousness of normativity in the association of one’s representations. This leads to a reading of Kant which is conceptualist, but in a way which accommodates considerations favoring nonconceptualism, in particular the (...)
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  45. Thinking the particular as contained under the universal.Hannah Ginsborg - 2006 - In Rebecca Kukla (ed.), Aesthetics and Cognition in Kant's Critical Philosophy. New York: Cambridge University Press.
    In a well-known passage from the Introduction to Kant’s Critique of Judgment, Kant defines the power or faculty of judgment [Urteilskraft] as "the capacity to think the particular as contained under the universal" (Introduction IV, 5:179).1 He then distinguishes two ways in which this faculty can be exercised, namely as determining or as reflecting. These two ways are defined as follows: "If the universal (the rule, the principle, the law) is given, then judgment, which subsumes the particular under it... is (...)
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  46. Primitive Normativity and Skepticism about Rules.Hannah Ginsborg - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy 108 (5):227-254.
  47. How Many of Us Are There?Hannah Tierney, Chris Howard, Victor Kumar, Trevor Kvaran & Shaun Nichols - 2014 - In Justin Sytsma (ed.), Advances in Experimental Philosophy of Mind. New York: Bloomsbury.
  48. Lectures on Kant’s Political Philosophy,.Hannah Arendt & Ronald Beiner - 1982 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 56 (2):386-386.
  49. Lawfulness without a Law.Hannah Ginsborg - 1997 - Philosophical Topics 25 (1):37-81.
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    Locke, language, and early-modern philosophy.Hannah Dawson - 2007 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    In a powerful and original contribution to the history of ideas, Hannah Dawson explores the intense preoccupation with language in early-modern philosophy, and presents a groundbreaking analysis of John Locke's critique of words. By examining a broad sweep of pedagogical and philosophical material from antiquity to the late seventeenth century, Dr Dawson explains why language caused anxiety in writers such as Montaigne, Bacon, Descartes, Hobbes, Gassendi, Nicole, Pufendorf, Boyle, Malebranche and Locke. Locke, Language and Early-Modern Philosophy demonstrates that new (...)
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