13 found
Order:
  1.  80
    Locke, language, and early-modern philosophy.Hannah Dawson - 2007 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    In a powerful and original contribution to the history of ideas, Hannah Dawson explores the intense preoccupation with language in early-modern philosophy, and presents a groundbreaking analysis of John Locke's critique of words. By examining a broad sweep of pedagogical and philosophical material from antiquity to the late seventeenth century, Dr Dawson explains why language caused anxiety in writers such as Montaigne, Bacon, Descartes, Hobbes, Gassendi, Nicole, Pufendorf, Boyle, Malebranche and Locke. Locke, Language and Early-Modern Philosophy demonstrates that new developments (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  2.  20
    A crisis of recognition: gender, race, and the struggle to be seen in pre-modernity.Hannah Dawson - 2024 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 32 (2):319-351.
    ABSTRACT It used to be said that shame culture waned in early modernity, but there is a growing body of historiography on the vital role that recognition and the opinion of others continued to play. Honour mattered; for some it was the mark and the maker of your true self. While philosophers like Hobbes, Locke, Mandeville, Hume, Smith, and Rousseau disagreed in their evaluations of the phenomenon, they were united in thinking that the great engine of recognition whirred like furious (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  17
    Shame in early modern thought: from sin to sociability.Hannah Dawson - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (3):377-398.
    ABSTRACTThis article challenges the historiographical narrative that modernity saw a transition from shame to guilt. I argue not only that these two concepts overlapped, but that, if anything, a shift occurred in the opposite direction: from guilt to shame. I identify two concepts of shame: guilt-shame, focused on sinfulness and caused by mere introspection, and reputation-shame, focused on social norms and caused by the gaze of others. Looking primarily at English texts, straying often into the European republic of letters, I (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  36
    Locke on language in (civil) society.Hannah Dawson - 2005 - History of Political Thought 26 (3):398-425.
    This article investigates the impact of Locke's philosophy of language on his political thought. It argues that certain aspects of his linguistic theory have a devastating impact on his vision of civil society. There are three ways in which the Lockean commonwealth is threatened. First, Locke's belief in the sovereign and constitutive power of words impedes the toleration that he holds so dear. Second, his fear that men break the compacts that make language work throws into doubt the possibility of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5. A ridiculous plan: Locke and the universal language movement.Hannah Dawson - 2007 - Locke Studies 7:137-158.
  6.  6
    Hobbes: great thinkers on modern life.Hannah Dawson - 2015 - New York, NY: Pegasus Books LLC.
    Thomas Hobbes was an English philosopher who was roiled by the bloodshed and turmoil of the English Civil War. During this period of ceaseless in-fighting, he wrote his masterpiece, Leviathan, which established the foundation for Western political thought. His work has inspired both hate and awe, as he reveals the darker side of human nature and the value of authority. Though he claims man's nature is inherently competitive and selfish, he also shows us how to utilize these traits to our (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  73
    Hobbes, Language and Philip Pettit.Hannah Dawson - 2009 - Hobbes Studies 22 (2):219-230.
    In this article I explore two aspects of Pettit's thesis about Hobbes' innovation with regard to the transformative and central role of language in thought and politics. First, I argue that while Hobbes had many debts to both traditionalists and innovators, he did break new ground in characterising language as in some ways constitutive of thought - a conclusion he came to as a consequence not only of his extreme nominalism, but also of his views on the exceptional sensibility of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Locke on private language.Hannah Dawson - 2003 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (4):609 – 637.
  9. Natural Religion: Pufendorf and Locke on the Edge of Freedom and Reason.Hannah Dawson - 2013 - In Q. Skinner & M. van Gelderen (eds.), Freedom and the Construction of Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 115-33.
  10.  4
    Rethinking Liberty Before Liberalism.Hannah Dawson & Annelien de Dijn (eds.) - 2022 - Cambridge University Press.
    Opens up new histories of freedom and republicanism by building on Quentin Skinner's ground-breaking Liberty before Liberalism nearly twenty five years after its initial publication. Leading historians and philosophers reveal the neo-Roman conception of liberty that Skinner unearthed as a normative and historical hermeneutic tool of enormous, ongoing power. The volume thinks with neo-Romanism to offer reinterpretations of individual thinkers, such as Montaigne, Grotius and Locke. It probes the role of neo-Roman liberty within hierarchies and structures beyond that of citizen (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. The place of democracy in late Stuart England.Hannah Dawson - 2019 - In Cesare Cuttica & Markku Peltonen (eds.), Democracy and anti-democracy in early modern England, 1603-1689. Boston: Brill.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. When reason does not see you: feminism at the intersection of history and philosophy.Hannah Dawson - 2023 - In Richard Bourke & Quentin Skinner (eds.), History in the humanities and social sciences. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  13.  31
    XII—Fighting for My Mind: Feminist Logic at the Edge of Enlightenment.Hannah Dawson - 2018 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 118 (3):275-306.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark