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  1. Changing order: replication and induction in scientific practice.Harry Collins - 1985 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    This fascinating study in the sociology of science explores the way scientists conduct, and draw conclusions from, their experiments. The book is organized around three case studies: replication of the TEA-laser, detecting gravitational rotation, and some experiments in the paranormal. "In his superb book, Collins shows why the quest for certainty is disappointed. He shows that standards of replication are, of course, social, and that there is consequently no outside standard, no Archimedean point beyond society from which we can lever (...)
  2. Rethinking Expertise.Harry Collins & Robert Evans - 2007 - University of Chicago Press.
    ISBN-13: 978-0-226-11360-9 (cloth : alk. paper) ISBN-10: 0-226-11360-4 ... HM651.C64 2007 158.1—dc22 2007022671 The paper used in this publication meets the minimum requirements of the American National Standard for Information ...
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  3. Trading zones and interactional expertise.Harry Collins, Robert Evans & Mike Gorman - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (4):657-666.
    The phrase ‘trading zone’ is often used to denote any kind of interdisciplinary partnership in which two or more perspectives are combined and a new, shared language develops. In this paper we distinguish between different types of trading zone by asking whether the collaboration is co-operative or coerced and whether the end-state is a heterogeneous or homogeneous culture. In so doing, we find that the voluntary development of a new language community—what we call an inter-language trading zone—represents only one of (...)
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  4. Stages in the Empirical Programme of Relativism.Harry M. Collins - 1981 - Social Studies of Science 11:3-10.
  5. The Golem: What Everyone Should Know about Science.Harry Collins & Trevor Pinch - 1995 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 46 (2):261-266.
  6. The seven sexes: A study in the sociology of a phenomenon, or the replication of experiments in physics.H. M. Collins - 1975 - Sociology 9 (2):205.
     
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  7. Epistemological Chicken HM Collins and Steven Yearley.H. M. Collins - 1992 - In Andrew Pickering (ed.), Science as Practice and Culture. University of Chicago Press. pp. 301.
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  8. Interactional expertise as a third kind of knowledge.Harry Collins - 2004 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (2):125-143.
    Between formal propositional knowledge and embodied skill lies ‘interactional expertise’—the ability to converse expertly about a practical skill or expertise, but without being able to practice it, learned through linguistic socialisation among the practitioners. Interactional expertise is exhibited by sociologists of scientific knowledge, by scientists themselves and by a large range of other actors. Attention is drawn to the distinction between the social and the individual embodiment theses: a language does depend on the form of the bodies of its members (...)
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  9.  47
    Experiments with interactional expertise.Harry Collins, Rob Evans, Rodrigo Ribeiro & Martin Hall - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (4):656-674.
    ‘Interactional expertise’ is developed through linguistic interaction without full scale practical immersion in a culture. Interactional expertise is the medium of communication in peer review in science, in review committees, and in interdisciplinary projects. It is also the medium of specialist journalists and of interpretative methods in the social sciences. We describe imitation game experiments designed to make concrete the idea of interactional expertise. The experiments show that the linguistic performance of those well socialized in the language of a specialist (...)
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  10. Three dimensions of expertise.Harry Collins - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):253-273.
    Psychologists and philosophers tend to treat expertise as a property of special individuals. These are individuals who have devoted much more time than the general population to the acquisition of their specific expertises. They are often said to pass through stages as they move toward becoming experts, for example, passing from an early stage, in which they follow self-conscious rules, to an expert stage in which skills are executed unconsciously. This approach is ‘one-dimensional’. Here, two extra dimensions are added. They (...)
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  11.  36
    Expertise revisited, Part II: Contributory expertise.Harry Collins, Robert Evans & Martin Weinel - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 56:103-110.
  12.  40
    II.3 What is TRASP?: The Radical Programme as a Methodological Imperative.H. M. Collins - 1981 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 11 (2):215-224.
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  13.  36
    Expertise revisited, Part I—Interactional expertise.Harry Collins & Robert Evans - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 54:113-123.
  14. A Strong Confirmation Of The Experimenters' Regress.H. M. Collins - 1994 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (3):493-503.
  15.  65
    The Philosophy of Umpiring and the Introduction of Decision-Aid Technology.Harry Collins - 2010 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 37 (2):135-146.
    Recently, technology has impacted upon sports umpiring and refereeing. One effect is that the means to make sound judgments has becoe ?distributed? to new groups of people such as TV viewers and commentators. The result is that justice on the sports field is often seen not to be done and the readiness to question umpires' decisions that once pertained only to the players and, in some sports, to the crowd, has spread to anyone who has a television. What is more, (...)
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  16.  45
    The Place of the ‘Core-Set’ in Modern Science: Social Contingency with Methodological Propriety in Science.H. M. Collins - 1981 - History of Science 19 (1):6-19.
  17.  17
    The One Culture?: A Conversation about Science.Jay A. Labinger & Harry Collins - 2001 - University of Chicago Press. Edited by Jay A. Labinger & Harry Collins.
    So far the "Science Wars" have generated far more heat than light. Combatants from one or the other of what C. P. Snow famously called "the two cultures" (science versus the arts and humanities) have launched bitter attacks but have seldom engaged in constructive dialogue about the central issues. In The One Culture?, Jay A. Labinger and Harry Collins have gathered together some of the world's foremost scientists and sociologists of science to exchange opinions and ideas rather than insults. The (...)
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  18.  68
    Shot through with voices: Dissociation mediates the relationship between varieties of inner speech and auditory hallucination proneness.Ben Alderson-Day, Simon McCarthy-Jones, Sarah Bedford, Hannah Collins, Holly Dunne, Chloe Rooke & Charles Fernyhough - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 27:288-296.
  19. The construction of the paranormal: Nothing unscientific is happening.Harry M. Collins & Trevor J. Pinch - 1979 - In Roy Wallis (ed.), On the margins of science: the social construction of rejected knowledge. Keele: University of Keele. pp. 27--237.
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  20. The Philosophy of Umpiring and the Introduction of Decision-Aid Technology.Harold Maurice Collins - unknown - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 37 (2):135-146.
    Recently, technology has impacted upon sports umpiring and refereeing. One effect is that the means to make sound judgments has becoe ‘distributed’ to new groups of people such as TV viewers and commentators. The result is that justice on the sports field is often seen not to be done and the readiness to question umpires' decisions that once pertained only to the players and, in some sports, to the crowd, has spread to anyone who has a television. What is more, (...)
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  21.  53
    Demarcating Fringe Science for Policy.Harry Collins, Andrew Bartlett & Luis Reyes-Galindo - 2017 - Perspectives on Science 25 (4):411-438.
    Fringe science has been an important topic since the start of the revolution in the social studies of science that occurred in the early 1970s. The revolution was what Collins and Evans refer to as the "second wave of science studies," while this paper is best thought of as an exercise in "third wave science studies." The first wave was that period which reached its apogee in the aftermath of the Second World War when science was seen as unquestionably the (...)
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  22.  61
    Studies of Expertise and Experience.Harry Collins - 2018 - Topoi 37 (1):67-77.
    I describe the program of analysis of expertise known as ‘Studies of Expertise and Experience’, or ‘SEE’ and contrast it with certain philosophical approaches. SEE differs from many approaches to expertise in that it takes the degree of ‘esotericity’ of the expertise to be one of its characteristics: esotericity is not a defining characteristic of expertise. Thus, native language speaking is taken to be an expertise along with gravitational wave physics. Expertise is taken to be acquired by socialisation within expert (...)
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  23.  27
    Embedded or embodied? a review of Hubert Dreyfus' What Computers Still Can't Do.H. M. Collins - 1996 - Artificial Intelligence 80 (1):99-117.
  24.  48
    They Give You The Keys And Say ‘drive It!’ Managers, Referred Expertise, And Other Expertises.Harry Collins & Gary Sanders - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (4):621-641.
    On the face of it, the directors of new large scientific projects have an impossible task. They have to make technical decisions about sciences in which they have never made a research contribution—sciences in which they have no contributory expertise. Furthermore, these decisions must be accepted and respected by the scientists who are making research contributions. The problem is discussed in two interviews conducted with two directors of large scientific projects. The paradox is resolved for the managers by their use (...)
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  25.  22
    Applying Philosophy to Refereeing and Umpiring Technology.Harry Collins - 2019 - Philosophies 4 (2):21.
    This paper draws an earlier book (with Evans and Higgins) entitled _Bad Call: Technology’s Attack on Referees and Umpires and How to Fix It_ (hereafter _Bad Call_) and its various precursor papers. These show why it is that current match officiating aids are unable to provide the kind of accuracy that is often claimed for them and that sports aficianados have been led to expect from them. Accuracy is improving all the time but the notion of perfect accuracy is a (...)
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  26. Interactional expertise and embodiment.Evan Selinger, Hubert Dreyfus & Harry Collins - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (4):722-740.
    In this four part exchange, Evan Selinger starts by stating that Collins’s empirical evidence in respect of linguistic socialization and its bearing on artificial intelligence and expertise is valuable; it advances philosophical and sociological understanding of the relationship between knowledge and language. Nevertheless, he argues that Collins mischaracterizes the data under review and thereby misrepresents how knowledge is acquired and understates the extent to which expert knowers are embodied. Selinger reconstructs the case for the importance of the body in the (...)
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  27.  8
    Science as a counter to the erosion of truth in society.Harry Collins - 2023 - Synthese 202 (5):1-23.
    The role of scientific values has taken on new urgency with recent changes in the politics of Western societies. The threat is the erosion of the distinction between true and false in political circles. This could rapidly lead to democracy sliding into populism thence fascism. In the light of this, philosophy and sociology of science should themselves re-examine their role. The main point of the paper is to argue that science could and should push against the erosion of truth in (...)
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  28. Interactional expertise and embodiment. Selinger, Evan, Dreyfus, Hubert & Harry Collins - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 38 (4):722-740.
    In this four part exchange, Evan Selinger starts by stating that Collins’s empirical evidence in respect of linguistic socialization and its bearing on artificial intelligence and expertise is valuable; it advances philosophical and sociological understanding of the relationship between knowledge and language. Nevertheless, he argues that Collins mischaracterizes the data under review and thereby misrepresents how knowledge is acquired and understates the extent to which expert knowers are embodied. Selinger reconstructs the case for the importance of the body in the (...)
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  29.  29
    Are Experts Right or are They Members of Expert Groups?Harry Collins - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (6):351-357.
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  30. What is tacit knowledge.Harry M. Collins - 2000 - In Karin Knorr Cetina, Theodore R. Schatzki & Eike von Savigny (eds.), The Practice Turn in Contemporary Theory. New York: Routledge. pp. 107--119.
     
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  31.  15
    Philosophical Foundations of Labour Law.Hugh Collins, Gillian Lester & Virginia Mantouvalou (eds.) - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    The first book to explore the philosophical foundations of labour law in detail, including topics such as the meaning of work, the relationship between employee and employer, and the demands of justice in the workplace.
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  32.  85
    The core of expertise.Harry Collins - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):399-416.
    I reply to my critics in respect of my work on expertise. I define the 'core' of the multidisciplinary 'expertise studies'. I argue that those who have taken the work seriously could resolve their problems by paying more attention to the core. Each could have made good use of an aspect of the core.
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  33.  27
    The trouble with Madeleine.Harry Collins - 2004 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (2):165-170.
    I respond to Selinger and Mix (Selinger, E. and Mix, J. 2004. On interactional expertise: Pragmatic and ontological considerations. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3: 145–163), concentrating on their charges that Collins (Collins, H. M. 2004a. Interactional expertise as a third form of knowledge. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3: 125–143) underrates the importance of interactional expertise as an expertise sui generis and that the paper fails to analyse the idea of embodiment sufficiently holistically, misleading treating the ‘body’ as no (...)
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  34.  48
    "When" do Scientists Prefer to Vary their Experiments?H. M. Collins - 1984 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 15 (2):169.
  35.  53
    Building an Antenna for Tacit Knowledge.Harry Collins - 2013 - Philosophia Scientiae 17 (3):25-39.
    My book, Tacit and Explicit Knowledge, is introduced. The introduction is also helpful in explaining the book to me, the author.
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  36.  21
    Building an Antenna for Tacit Knowledge.Harry Collins - 2013 - Philosophia Scientiae 17:25-39.
    My book, Tacit and Explicit Knowledge, is introduced. The introduction is also helpful in explaining the book to me, the author.
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  37.  4
    Captives and Victims: Comment on Scott, Richards, and Martin.H. M. Collins - 1991 - Science, Technology and Human Values 16 (2):249-251.
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  38. Science as craftwork with integrity.Harry Collins - 2021 - In Inkeri Koskinen, David Ludwig, Zinhle Mncube, Luana Poliseli & Luis Reyes-Galindo (eds.), Global Epistemologies and Philosophies of Science. Routledge.
     
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  39.  49
    Performances and arguments: Bruno Latour: The modern cult of the factish Gods. Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2010, x+157pp, $69.95 HB, $19.95 PB.Harry Collins - 2011 - Metascience 21 (2):409-418.
    Performances and arguments Content Type Journal Article Category Essay Review Pages 1-10 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9562-0 Authors Harry Collins, SOCSI, Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF10 3WT UK Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  40.  36
    Journey Into Space HM Collins and Steven Yearley.H. M. Collins - 1992 - In Andrew Pickering (ed.), Science as Practice and Culture. University of Chicago Press. pp. 369.
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  41.  14
    Interactional Imogen: language, practice and the body.Harry Collins - 2020 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 19 (5):933-960.
    Here I try to improve on the available answers to certain long-debated questions and set out some consequences for the answers. Are there limits to the extent to which we can understand the conceptual worlds of other human communities and of non-human creatures? How does this question relate to our ability to engage in other cultures’ practices and languages? What is meant by ‘the body’ and what is meant by ‘the brain’ and how do different meanings bear on the questions? (...)
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  42.  65
    The experimenter's regress as philosophical sociology.H. M. Collins - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (1):149-156.
    I will divide my discussion into two. In the first part I will discuss Godin and Gingras's delicious claim that the experimenter's regress is anticipated by Sextus Empiricus's formulation of scepticism. In the second part, I will try to deal with Godin and Gingras's ‘critical argument’, that the experimenter's regress would be redundant if we were less concerned with ‘frightening philosophers’.
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  43.  51
    The Structure of Knowledge.H. Collins - 1993 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 60:95-116.
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  44.  23
    Introduction: A new programme of research?Harry Collins - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A.
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  45.  81
    Catastrophe ethics and activist speech: Reflections on moral norms, advocacy, and technical judgment.Evan Selinger, Paul Thompson & Harry Collins - 2011 - Metaphilosophy 42 (1-2):118-144.
    Abstract: This essay critically examines whether there are ethical dimensions to the way that expertise, knowledge claims, and expressions of skepticism intersect on technical matters that influence public policy, especially during times of crisis. It compares two different perspectives on the matter: a philosophical outlook rooted in discourse and virtue ethics and a sociological outlook rooted in the so-called third-wave approach to science studies. The comparison occurs through metaphilosophical analysis and applied claims that clarify how the disciplinary orientations appear to (...)
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  46.  65
    Humans not Instruments.Harry Collins - 2010 - Spontaneous Generations 4 (1):138-147.
    I argue that it is serious mistake to treat instruments as having parity with humans in the making of scientific knowledge. I try to show why the parity view is misplaced by beginning with the “Extended Mind” thesis which can be seen as an individualistic version of Actor/ant Network Theory, and then move on to instruments. The idea of parity cannot be maintained in the face of close examination of actions as simple as doing a calculation or accepting the reading (...)
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  47.  12
    Ways of Going On: An Analysis of Skill Applied to Medical Practice.W. E. Bijker, G. H. de Vries & H. M. Collins - 1997 - Science, Technology and Human Values 22 (3):267-285.
    Humans do two types of actions, polimorphic actions and mimeomorphic actions. The ability to carry out polimorphic actions cannot be mastered outside of socialization. Mimeomorphic actions, however, can be learned in other ways; sometimes, they can be learned away from the context of practice. Polimorphic actions cannot be mimicked by machines, but some mimeomorphic actions can. Other mimeomorphic actions are too complex to mechanize. Actions that cannot be mechanized because they are physically complicated should not be confused with actions that (...)
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  48.  7
    Socialness and the Undersocialized Conception of Society.H. M. Collins - 1998 - Science, Technology and Human Values 23 (4):494-516.
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  49.  53
    Foundations of Indirect Discrimination Law.Tarunabh Khaitan & Hugh Collins (eds.) - 2018 - Bloomsbury.
    Indirect discrimination (or disparate impact) concerns the application of the same rule to everyone, even though that rule significantly disadvantages one particular group in society. Ever since its recognition by the Supreme Court of the United States in 1971, liberal democracies around the world have grappled with the puzzle that it can sometimes be unfair and wrong to treat everyone equally. The law's regulation of private acts that unintentionally (but disproportionately) harm vulnerable groups has remained extremely controversial, especially in the (...)
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  50. Keeping the collectivity in mind?Harry Collins, Andy Clark & Jeff Shrager - 2008 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):353-374.
    The key question in this three way debate is the role of the collectivity and of agency. Collins and Shrager debate whether cognitive psychology has, like the sociology of knowledge, always taken the mind to extend beyond the individual. They agree that irrespective of the history, socialization is key to understanding the mind and that this is compatible with Clark’s position; the novelty in Clark’s “extended mind” position appears to be the role of the material rather than the role of (...)
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