Results for 'Gynecology'

727 found
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  1.  14
    Do gynaecology outpatients use the Internet to seek health information? A questionnaire survey.Padmaja Neelapala, S. K. Duvvi, G. Kumar & B. N. Kumar - 2008 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (2):300-304.
  2. The Science of Woman. Gynaecology and Gender in England, 1800-1929.Ornella Moscucci & Michele S. Kohler - 1994 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 16 (2):355.
     
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  3.  27
    What do medical students experience as moral problems during their obstetric and gynaecology clerkship?G. Olthuis & L. Dukel - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):e2-e2.
    This article reports on moral problems that were raised by medical students as the basis for an ethical case-conference in an obstetrics and gynaecology clerkship. After introducing the issue of teaching clinical ethics, the method of our case-conference is explained. Next, the variety of topics and related moral problems are presented. The article continues with a discussion of three distinct and challenging aspects that characterise obstetrics and gynaecology as a domain for teaching clinical ethics. The conclusion puts forward three significant (...)
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  4.  27
    An experimental case-conference programme for obstetrics and gynaecology clinical students.H. ten Have & G. Essed - 1989 - Journal of Medical Ethics 15 (2):94-98.
    Since the founding of the University of Limburg (1974), in The Netherlands, an innovative medical curriculum has been guided by educational principles of problem-orientation, continuous assessment, student initiative and attitude development. The teaching of medical ethics was built into the preclinical curriculum from the start. However, the clinical years remained largely unaffected, and only recently has an effort been made to extend the educational philosophy to this more or less traditional part of medical education. Within this context, an experiment of (...)
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  5.  15
    Poor Representation of Developing Countries in Editorial Boards of Leading Obstetrics and Gynaecology Journals.Seema Rawat, Priyanka Mathe, Vishnu B. Unnithan, Pratyush Kumar, Kumar Abhishek, Nazia Praveen & Kiran Guleria - 2023 - Asian Bioethics Review 15 (3):241-258.
    Evidence suggests a limited contribution to the total research output in leading obstetrics and gynaecology journals by researchers from the developing world. Editorial bias, quality of scientific research produced and language barriers have been attributed as possible causes for this phenomenon. The aim of this study was to understand the prevalence of editorial board members based out of low and lower-middle income countries in leading journals in the field of obstetrics and gynaecology. The top 21 journals in the field of (...)
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  6.  17
    The Science of Woman: Gynaecology and Gender in England, 1800-1929. Ornella Moscucci.Londa Schiebinger - 1991 - Isis 82 (4):763-764.
  7.  11
    Progress in Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Volume 2. Edited by Studd John. (Churchill Livingstone, 1982.).S. L. Barron - 1983 - Journal of Biosocial Science 15 (2):249-250.
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  8.  18
    Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Tudor and Stuart EnglandAudrey Eccles.Harold J. Cook - 1983 - Isis 74 (3):444-445.
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  9.  44
    SORANOS' GYNAECOLOGY P. Burguière, D. Gourevitch, Y. Malinas: Soranos d'Ephèse : Maladies des femmes. Tome IV, livre 4 . Pp. xxviii + 197. Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 2000. ISBN: 2-251-00480-. [REVIEW]Helen King - 2003 - The Classical Review 53 (02):338-.
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  10.  25
    From Witchcraft to Wisdom: A History of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in the British Isles.Richard Barnett - 2009 - Annals of Science 66 (4):561-563.
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  11.  44
    The opinions and experiences of Irish obstetric and gynaecology trainee doctors in relation to abortion services in Ireland.Kara Aitken, Paul Patek & Mark E. Murphy - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (11):778-783.
    Introduction The provision of abortion services in the Republic of Ireland is legally restricted. Recent legislation that has been implemented allows for abortion if there is a real and substantial risk to the woman's life, but in general Irish women must travel abroad for abortion services. The aims of this study were to investigate the clinical experiences of Irish obstetric non-consultant hospital doctors that work in this environment and to assess their attitudes towards termination of pregnancy. Methods We conducted an (...)
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  12.  18
    A trial of a reproductive ethics and law curriculum for obstetrics and gynaecology residents.Kavita Shah Arora - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (12):854-856.
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  13.  12
    The History of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Michael J. O'Dowd, Elliot E. Philipp.Helen Rodnite Lemay - 1995 - Isis 86 (4):624-625.
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  14.  21
    Monica H. Green, Making Women’s Medicine Masculine: The Rise of Male Authority in Pre-Modern Gynaecology.Gabriella Zuccolin - 2013 - Clio 37:233-236.
    Il y a trente ans, évoquant la gynécologie dans l’Antiquité, Giulia Sissa écrivait que l’utérus, « dépositaire insensé et irritable de la reproduction sociale, est le seul organe qui a forcé la connaissance médicale hippocratique à définir en son sein une véritable spécialité ». L’ouvrage de Monica H. Green reprend, en les contextualisant dans un paradigme méthodologique beaucoup plus complexe, ses études précédentes sur la figure historique et littéraire de Trotula et sur la médecine féminin...
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  15.  16
    Helen King. Midwifery, Obstetrics, and the Rise of Gynaecology: The Uses of a Sixteenth‐Century Compendium. x + 228 pp., figs., bibl., index. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2007. $99.95. [REVIEW]Katharine Park - 2009 - Isis 100 (3):650-651.
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  16.  15
    Aetii Amideni Libri medicinales V-VIII. Alexander OlivieriAëtios of Amida: The Gynaecology and Obstetrics of the VIth Century A.D.James V. Ricci. [REVIEW]George Sarton - 1951 - Isis 42 (2):150-152.
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  17.  11
    Safavid Medical Practice, or The Practice of Medicine, Surgery and Gynaecology in Persia between 1500 A.D. and 1750 A.D.Cyril Elgood. [REVIEW]Emilie Savage Smith - 1973 - Isis 64 (1):122-123.
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  18.  6
    Midwifery, Obstetrics, and the Rise of Gynaecology: The Uses of a Sixteenth‐Century Compendium. [REVIEW]Katharine Park - 2009 - Isis 100:650-651.
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  19.  16
    Aetii Amideni Libri medicinales V-VIII by Alexander Olivieri; Aëtios of Amida: The Gynaecology and Obstetrics of the VIth Century A.D. by James V. Ricci. [REVIEW]George Sarton - 1951 - Isis 42:150-152.
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  20.  24
    Ethics in Obstetrics and Gynecology.Joan C. Callahan, Laurence B. McCullough & Frank A. Chervenak - 1996 - Hastings Center Report 26 (2):45.
    Book reviewed in this article: Ethics in Obstetrics and Gynecology. By Laurence B. McCullough and Frank A. Chervenak.
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  21.  13
    Ethics in obstetrics and gynecology.B. Almond - 1995 - Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (3):190-190.
  22.  8
    Clinical Gynecology and Aristotle's Biology: The Composition of HA X.Lesley Dean-Jones - 2012 - Apeiron 45 (2):180-199.
  23.  28
    A comparison of medical litigation filed against obstetrics and gynecology, internal medicine, and surgery departments.Tomoko Hamasaki & Akihito Hagihara - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):72.
    The aim of this study was to review the typical factors related to physician’s liability in obstetrics and gynecology departments, as compared to those in internal medicine and surgery, regarding a breach of the duty to explain.
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  24.  43
    Ethics in obstetrics and gynecology.Laurence B. McCullough, Frank A. Chervenak & Susan M. Scott - 1995 - HEC Forum 7 (6):379-380.
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  25.  16
    Time, Magic, and Gynecology Contemporary Israeli Practice.Miriam Jacoby - 1995 - Science in Context 8 (1):231-248.
    The ArgumentThis paper describes the way in which a simple device, the pregnancy wheel, has been used by the medical profession to impose a new way of measuring and experiencing pregnancy.The change involves counting in weeks instead of counting in months and it is gradually replacing a commonsensical method that had deep physiological and cultural roots. In contrast, the medical methodology of counting forty weeks is more complicated and lacks direct connections to the events of pregnancyIn the encounter between the (...)
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  26.  4
    The emergence of molecular gynecology: homeobox and Wnt genes in the female reproductive tract.Jan Kitajewski & David Sassoon - 2000 - Bioessays 22 (10):902-910.
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  27. Ethics in obstetrics and gynecology by McCullough, lb, Chervenak, fa (vol 21, pg 190, 1995).B. Almond - 1995 - Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (5):318-318.
     
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  28.  52
    Fat Chance Getting an Obstetrician in South Florida? Ethics and Discrimination in Obstetrics and Gynecology.Glenn McGee - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):1 - 2.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page 1-2, June 2011.
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  29.  21
    History of Gynecology by Richard A. Leonardo. [REVIEW]J. De C. M. Saunders - 1947 - Isis 37:123-124.
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  30.  55
    Concept of defensive medicine and litigation among Sudanese doctors working in obstetrics and gynecology.AbdelAziem A. Ali, Moawia E. Hummeida, Yasir A. M. Elhassan, Wisal O. M. Nabag, Mohammed Ahmed A. Ahmed & Gamal K. Adam - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1-5.
    BackgroundObstetrics and gynaecology always has reputation for being a highly litigious. The field of obstetrics and gynaecology is surrounded by different circumstances that stimulate the doctors to practice defensive medicine.MethodsThis study was directed to assess the extent and the possible effect of defensive medicine phenomenon on medical decision making among different grades of obstetric and gynaecologic Sudanese doctors, and to determine any experience of medical litigations with respect to sources and factors associated with it.ResultsA total of 117 doctors were approached, (...)
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  31.  7
    Problems of legitimacy of modern obstetrical gynecology.Kai Haucke & Natalie Dippong - 2012 - Ethik in der Medizin 24 (1):43-55.
    ZusammenfassungEmpirische Daten belegen, dass die moderne Geburtsmedizin Schwangerschaft und Gebären vorrangig als krankhaft wahrnimmt, was zu einem Legitimationsdefizit führt: Eine primär invasive Geburtsmedizin verletzt das Prinzip der Nichtschädigung, verursacht vermeidbare Kosten und ist nicht ohne weiteres durch das Autonomieprinzip gedeckt. Von den unmittelbar Beteiligten ist diese Pathologisierung als eine solche jedoch kaum wahrgenommen worden. Daher stellt sich die Frage, wie es zur sozialen Akzeptanz einer derart drastischen Wahrnehmungsverschiebung kommen konnte. Da Begriffe unsere Wahrnehmung strukturieren, interessiert uns vor allem die konzeptionelle (...)
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  32.  21
    The Lawyer's Perspective on the Use of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology.Albert L. Bundy & A. Everette James - 1985 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 13 (5):219-224.
  33.  12
    The Lawyer's Perspective on the Use of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology.Albert L. Bundy & A. Everette James - 1985 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 13 (5):219-224.
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  34.  22
    Book Review: Public Privates: Performing Gynecology from Both Ends of the Speculum. Terri Kapsalis. (1997). Durham, NC: Duke University Press. 216 pp. [REVIEW]Sue Sun Yom - 2001 - Journal of Medical Humanities 22 (4):311-313.
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  35.  35
    Concept of defensive medicine and litigation among Sudanese doctors working in obstetrics and gynecology.A. Ali AbdelAziem, E. Hummeida Moawia, A. M. Elhassan Yasir, O. M. Nabag Wisal, A. Ahmed Mohammed Ahmed & K. Adam Gamal - forthcoming - Most Recent Articles: Bmc Medical Ethics.
    Obstetrics and gynaecology always has reputation for being a highly litigious. The field of obstetrics and gynaecology is surrounded by different circumstances that stimulate the doctors to practice defensive..
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  36.  18
    Feasibility of an ethics and professionalism curriculum for faculty in obstetrics and gynecology: a pilot study.Lori-Linell Hollins, Marilena Wolf, Brian Mercer & Kavita Shah Arora - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (12):806-810.
    ObjectiveThere have been increased efforts to implement medical ethics curricula at the student and resident levels; however, practising physicians are often left unconsidered. Therefore, we sought to pilot an ethics and professionalism curriculum for faculty in obstetrics and gynaecology to remedy gaps in the formal, informal and hidden curriculum in medical education.MethodsAn ethics curriculum was developed for faculty within the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at a tertiary care, academic hospital. During the one-time, 4-hour, mandatory in-person session, the participants voluntarily (...)
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  37.  4
    Improving Patient-Doctor Communication about Risk and Choice in Obstetrics and Gynecology through Medical Education: A Call for Action.Kathryn Mills, Rizwana Biviji-Sharma, Jennifer Chevinsky & Macey L. Henderson - 2014 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 25 (2):176-176.
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  38.  5
    New Fragments of Rufus of Ephesus’ On the Retention of Menses.Brent Arehart & Joshua Bocher - 2022 - Classical Quarterly 72 (2):764-777.
    Rufus of Ephesus (fl. c.100c.e.) was a prolific medical author and practitioner in the Imperial period whose historical importance has been obscured by the loss of most of his works. One of the largest gaps in our knowledge of Rufus’ corpus is his gynaecological writings, none of which survives in full. This article assembles and comments on several fragments from Rufus’ lost gynaecological workOn the Retention of Menses(perhapsΠερὶ τῶν ἐπεχομένων ἐμμήνων). Comparison of overlapping passages from the authors Ibn al-Jazzār (tenth (...)
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  39.  17
    The concept of intersectionality in bioethics: a systematic review.Lisa Brünig, Hannes Kahrass & Sabine Salloch - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1):1-20.
    Background Intersectionality is a concept that originated in Black feminist movements in the US-American context of the 1970s and 1980s, particularly in the work of feminist scholar and lawyer Kimberlé W. Crenshaw. Intersectional approaches aim to highlight the interconnectedness of gender and sexuality with other social categories, such as race, class, age, and ability to look at how individuals are discriminated against and privileged in institutions and societal power structures. Intersectionality is a “traveling concept”, which also made its way into (...)
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  40. Bioethics and physiotherapy.I. Poulis - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (8):435-436.
    Physiotherapy raises serious bioethical questions that are far too little discussed. Concerns include the lack of a clearly defined end point, the closeness of interaction between therapist and patient, the patient’s own share of responsibility, and the common failure to refer patients for rehabilitation.Physiotherapy has evolved dramatically in recent years, to the point where it is now a major healthcare profession offering assessment, diagnosis and treatment for a wide range of conditions, from sports injuries to rehabilitation for major injuries and (...)
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  41.  16
    Women in Science.Sophia Connell - 2021 - Oxford Classical Dictionary.
    Women were involved in both practical and theoretical aspects of scientific endeavour in the ancient world. Although the evidence is scant, it is clear that women innovated techniques in textile manufacture, metallurgy, and medical sciences. The most extensive engagement of women in science was in medicine, including obstetrics, gynaecology, pharmacology, and dermatology. The evidence for this often comes from male medical writers. Women were also involved in the manufacture of gold alloys, which interested later alchemists. Maria of Alexandria innovated equipment (...)
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  42.  35
    From whom do physicians obtain consent for surgery?Zahra Jarayedi & Fariba Asghari - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (6):366-370.
    ObjectiveTo evaluate the knowledge and performance of surgical residents regarding the person from whom informed consent should be taken for surgery and from whom the consent is taken in practice.Materials and methodsThis study was done in 2013. The population of this study was all residents of urology, surgery, orthopaedic surgery and gynaecology of Tehran and Iran University of Medical Sciences. The study tool was a self-administered questionnaire, containing questions on their knowledge and performance regarding informed consent acquisition from patients with (...)
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  43. Are we teaching students that patients don't matter?J. Robinson - 1985 - Journal of Medical Ethics 11 (1):19-26.
    Medical students may fear that their training leeches away the caring attitudes which attracted them to medicine. Some research suggests they are right. The medical school has a duty to support and encourage their values, but the reverse may happen. Students are taught about legal consent but not ethical consent. They may see or participate in concealment of medical mistakes and learn to practise deceit. The use of unconscious females for gynaecology teaching may encourage the wrong attitudes to patients. Trainee (...)
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  44.  11
    The ghost of anatomies past: Simulating the one-sex body in modern medical training.Ericka Johnson - 2005 - Feminist Theory 6 (2):141-159.
    An examination of the use of medical simulators shows that they contain traces of the one-sex body model found in pre-Enlightenment anatomies. The simulators present the male body as ‘male including female’ rather than ‘male, not female’. Only when female sex organs are relevant to a practice, as in gynaecology, does a simulator need to become ‘female, not male’. The widely held modernist understanding of sex and gender as binary categories is actually masking local practices which allow varied sex and (...)
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  45.  21
    Can patients be sure they are fully informed when representatives of surgical equipment manufacturers attend their operations?M. Sillender - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (7):395-397.
    Objective: To determine the practice in UK hospitals regarding the level of patient involvement and consent when representatives of commercial surgical device manufacturers attend and advise during operations.Methods: An anonymous postal questionnaire was sent to the senior nurse in charge in all 236 UK gynaecology theatres in 2004. 79/236 replies were received.Results: Operating departments were visited every 2 weeks on average by a representative of the surgical device manufacturer. Actual operations were attended every 10 weeks, although there was much variation. (...)
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  46.  32
    Diet in pregnancy, 1930–1960: a shifting social, political and scientific concern.Najia Sultan - 2010 - Medical Humanities 36 (2):118-121.
    The diet of expectant mothers was a significant issue of social, political and scientific concern between 1930 and 1960. However, while histories of maternity services and nutritional science are independently available, no existing study addresses the nutrition of expectant mothers in this period. Between 1900 and 1930, maternal mortality rates were rising despite improving clinical antenatal provisions. Breakthroughs in nutritional science resulted in the identification of key dietary components, while changing social attitudes meant hunger was increasingly being seen as a (...)
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  47.  11
    Hippocrates: Greek Text and Translation, with Introduction and Commentary.Elizabeth M. Craik (ed.) - 1998 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The wide-ranging content of Places in Man represents the entire Hippocratic Corpus: anatomy, physiology, pathology, medical ideology, clinical instruction, traditional love, gynaecology. Despite this wide and varied scope, the work is conceptually coherent and stylistically consistent. In this new edition of the Greek text with translation and commentary, the language and content of the work are studied in relation to other treatises of the Hippocratic Corpus, and to fragmentary early medical writings. It is argued that while there are `Koan' and (...)
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  48.  24
    Willingness to Care for Patients With HIV/AIDS.Maritta Välimäki, Pekka Makkonen, Mari Blek-Vehkaluoto, Vida Mockiene, Natalja Istomina, Ulla Raid, Maj-Lis Vänskä & Tarja Suominen - 2008 - Nursing Ethics 15 (5):586-600.
    This study aims to describe and compare nurses' willingness to provide care for patients with HIV/AIDS and factors associated with this in three countries. An international cross-sectional survey was conducted among nurses working in medical, surgical and gynaecology units in Finland (n =427), Estonia (n =221) and Lithuania ( n =185) in early 2006. The response rates were 75% (n = 322) in Finland, 54% (n =119) in Estonia and 86% (n = 160) in Lithuania. A modified version of a (...)
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  49.  18
    Nursing research refrained by the inescapable reality of practice: a personal encounter.Annette Huntington - 1996 - Nursing Inquiry 3 (3):167-171.
    This paper describes how an innocent venture outside the confines of academia to update my nursing skills completely changed the focus of my research. I was deeply involved in the theoretical development of my thesis, which I thought was a feminist exploration of the meaning of health for mid‐life women. I was immersed in feminist theory and was exploring the work of the French Feminists. I had written comprehensive draft chapters about nursing, women's bodies and science. While I was absorbed (...)
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  50.  33
    Medical students' attitudes to abortion: a comparison between Queen's University Belfast and the University of Oslo.R. Steele - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (6):390-394.
    Background: Abortion policy varies significantly between Northern Ireland and Norway. This is the first study to compare medical students’ attitudes towards abortion in two different countries. Objective: To assess medical students’ attitudes to abortion at the University of Oslo (UiO) and Queen’s University Belfast (QUB). Design: An anonymous questionnaire completed by 59 medical students at UiO and 86 medical students at QUB. Participants: Students who had completed their obstetrics and gynaecology placements during 2006/2007. Results: The students’ responses (UiO versus QUB) (...)
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