Results for 'Gregory R. Samanez-Larkin'

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  1.  23
    Emotion identification across adulthood using the Dynamic FACES database of emotional expressions in younger, middle aged, and older adults.Catherine A. C. Holland, Natalie C. Ebner, Tian Lin & Gregory R. Samanez-Larkin - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (2):245-257.
    ABSTRACTFacial stimuli are widely used in behavioural and brain science research to investigate emotional facial processing. However, some studies have demonstrated that dynamic expressions elicit stronger emotional responses compared to static images. To address the need for more ecologically valid and powerful facial emotional stimuli, we created Dynamic FACES, a database of morphed videos from younger, middle-aged, and older adults displaying naturalistic emotional facial expressions. To assess adult age differences in emotion identification of dynamic stimuli and to provide normative ratings (...)
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  2.  13
    The Effects of Methylphenidate on Resting-State Functional Connectivity of the Basal Nucleus of Meynert, Locus Coeruleus, and Ventral Tegmental Area in Healthy Adults.Ryan L. Kline, Sheng Zhang, Olivia M. Farr, Sien Hu, Laszlo Zaborszky, Gregory R. Samanez-Larkin & Chiang-Shan R. Li - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  3.  39
    Universal Emergency Access under Managed Care: Universal Doubt or Mission Impossible?Gregory Luke Larkin, James E. Weber & Arthur R. Derse - 1999 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (2):213-225.
    Appropriate concerns about cost and unequal access to healthcare have resulted in the creation of powerful managed networks seeking to share the risks of high healthcare costs among plans, providers, and patients. Much to their credit, these managed networks have slowed the rise in healthcare spending by as much as 44% in markets with high HMO penetration. However, whether these savings will materially improve access and quality remains to be seen.
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  4.  15
    Ethics: the art of character.Gregory R. Beabout - 2018 - New York: Wooden Books. Edited by Michael Hannis.
    ...Drawing primarily on the work of Aristotle, Socrates, and Plato, ethicist Gregory Beabout contemplates the quest for courage, justice, temperance, wisdom, empathy, humility, and much more. Featuring additional chapters by Mike Hannis on medical ethics, workplace ethics, and environmental ethics..."--Dust jacket.
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  5. Think pieces.Gregory R. Peterson, Religious Metaphor Ursula Goodenough, What Is Religious Naturalism, Vajrayana Art & Iconography Jensine Andresen - 2000 - Zygon 35 (2):217.
  6.  41
    Psychophysical scaling: Judgments of attributes or objects?Gregory R. Lockhead - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (3):543-558.
    Psychophysical scaling models of the form R = f, with R the response and I some intensity of an attribute, all assume that people judge the amounts of an attribute. With simple biases excepted, most also assume that judgments are independent of space, time, and features of the situation other than the one being judged. Many data support these ideas: Magnitude estimations of brightness increase with luminance. Nevertheless, I argue that the general model is wrong. The stabilized retinal image literature (...)
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  7.  25
    Modeling temporal and spatial differences.Gregory R. Lockhead - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):302-303.
  8.  19
    Sola Scriptura and the Evolutionary Argument Against Naturalism.Tyler Dalton McNabb & Gregory R. P. Stacey - 2024 - TheoLogica: An International Journal for Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology 9 (1).
    Inspired by Plantinga’s Evolutionary Argument Against Naturalism (EAAN), we develop an argument—the “Scriptural Argument Against Dogmatic Protestantism” (SAADP)—that Protestants who accept the doctrine of sola scriptura cannot reasonably hold that Catholic and Eastern churches are in doctrinal error. If sola scriptura is true and Catholic and Eastern Churches have fallen into error, it is improbable that any Protestant can reliably form true beliefs about controversial points of Christian doctrine, including sola scriptura or suggestions that Catholic and Eastern Christians are in (...)
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  9.  45
    Management as a Domain-Relative Practice that Requires and Develops Practical Wisdom.Gregory R. Beabout - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (2):405-432.
    ABSTRACT:Although Alasdair MacIntyre has criticized both the market economy and applied ethics, his writing has generated significant discussion within the literature of business ethics and organizational studies. In this article, I extend this conversation by proposing the use of MacIntyre’s account of the virtues to conceive of management as a domain-relative practice that requires and develops practical wisdom. I proceed in four steps. First, I explain MacIntyre’s account of the virtues in light of his definition of a “practice.” Second, I (...)
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  10.  34
    A parallel view of the history of psychophysics.Gregory R. Lockhead - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):154-155.
  11. Minding God: Theology and the Cognitive Sciences.Gregory R. Peterson - 2003
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  12.  58
    Is my feeling your pain bad for others? Empathy as virtue versus empathy as fixed trait.Gregory R. Peterson - 2017 - Zygon 52 (1):232-257.
    The purpose of this article is to critique the primary arguments given by Paul Bloom and Jesse Prinz against empathy, and to argue instead that empathy is best understood as a virtue that plays an important but complicated role in the moral life. That it is a virtue does not mean that it always functions well, and empathy sometimes contributes to behavior that is partial and unfair. In some of their writings, both Bloom and Prinz endorse the view that empathy (...)
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  13.  74
    In praise of folly? Theology and the university.Gregory R. Peterson - 2008 - Zygon 43 (3):563-577.
    To suppose the possibility of dialogue between theology and science is to suppose that theology is an intellectually worthy partner to engage in dialogue with science. The status of theology as a discipline, however, remains contested, one sign of which is the absence of theology from the university. I argue that a healthy theology-science dialogue would benefit from the presence of theology as an academic discipline in the university. Theology and theologians would benefit from the much closer contact with university (...)
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  14.  57
    Whither Panentheism?Gregory R. Peterson - 2001 - Zygon 36 (3):395-405.
    Panentheism has received widespread support among theologians involved in the religion‐science dialogue, due in no small part to the success with which panentheism addresses a range of issues. Nevertheless, panentheism as a theological premise needs continued development and elucidation. Panentheism is often presented as a theoretical model of the God‐world relationship, yet the supporting arguments rely on metaphors that are varied and open‐ended. Analogy from the mind‐body relationship leads to a “weak” panentheism that emphasizes the presence of God, while whole‐part (...)
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  15.  67
    Kierkegaard Amidst the Catholic Tradition.Gregory R. Beabout - 2013 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (3):521-540.
    To mark the 200th anniversary of the birth of Søren Kierkegaard, I review in this essay the relationship between Kierkegaard and the Catholic tradition. First, I look back to consider both Kierkegaard’s encounter with Catholicism and the influence of his work upon Catholics. Second, I look around to consider some of the recent work on Kierkegaard and Catholicism, especially Jack Mulder’s recent book, Kierkegaard and the Catholic Tradition, and the many articles that examine Kierkegaard’s relation to Catholicism in the multi-volume (...)
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  16.  15
    The Efficacy of Scapegoating and Revolutionary Violence.Gregory R. McCreery - 2014 - Philosophy, Culture, and Traditions 10:203-219.
  17.  57
    The Evolution of Consciousness and the Theology of Nature.Gregory R. Peterson - 1999 - Zygon 34 (2):283-306.
    Theology and philosophy have traditionally assumed a radical split between human beings and the rest of creation. Philosophically, the split is usually justified in terms of a locus humanus, some one cognitive trait that human beings possess and nonhuman animals do not. Theologically, this trait is usually identified as that which makes us in the image of God. Research in animal cognition, however, suggests that we are not unique in as many respects as we think we are. This suggests that (...)
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  18. Modal Ontological Arguments.Gregory R. P. Stacey - 2023 - Philosophy Compass 18 (8):e12938.
    Inspired by the third chapter of Anselm's Proslogion, twentieth century philosophers including Charles Hartshorne and Alvin Plantinga developed “modal” ontological arguments for the existence of God. Such arguments use modal logic to infer God's existence from the premises that (i) God's existence is possible and (ii) if God exists, He exists necessarily. Like other ontological arguments, modal arguments have won few converts to theism; many commentators consider them question‐begging or liable to parody. This article details how recent attempts to defend (...)
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  19.  24
    Aquinas, Instinct and the “Internalist” Justification of Faith.Gregory R. P. Stacey - 2021 - New Blackfriars 102 (1098):205-224.
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  20.  10
    In Praise of Folly? Theology and the University.Gregory R. Peterson & Nicholaos Jones - 2008 - Zygon 43 (3):563-577.
    Abstract.To suppose the possibility of dialogue between theology and science is to suppose that theology is an intellectually worthy partner to engage in dialogue with science. The status of theology as a discipline, however, remains contested, one sign of which is the absence of theology from the university. I argue that a healthy theology‐science dialogue would benefit from the presence of theology as an academic discipline in the university. Theology and theologians would benefit from the much closer contact with university (...)
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  21.  64
    Uniqueness, the image of God, and the problem of method: Engaging Van huyssteen.Gregory R. Peterson - 2008 - Zygon 43 (2):467-474.
    Wentzel van Huyssteen's book Alone in the World? provides a thoughtful and nuanced account of human evolution from a theological perspective. Not only does his work provide what is perhaps the only sustained theological reflection specifically on human evolution, but his working through of many of the issues, particularly on the image of God literature in theology, has few parallels. Despite this, I focus on what I consider to be several weaknesses of the text, including areas of theological method, theological (...)
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  22.  64
    Demarcation and the Scientistic Fallacy.Gregory R. Peterson - 2003 - Zygon 38 (4):751-761.
    For many theologians and philosophers, scientism is among the greatest of intellectual sins. In its most commonly cited form, scientism consists in claiming that science is the only source of real knowledge and, therefore, that what science does not discover does not exist. Because the charge of scientism is frequently levied, it is important to be clear about what exactly is being claimed in its name. I argue that scientism can best be understood as a fallacy, specifically as a kind (...)
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  23.  32
    Social values as arguments: similar is convincing.Gregory R. Maio, Ulrike Hahn, John-Mark Frost, Toon Kuppens, Nadia Rehman & Shanmukh Kamble - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
  24.  78
    On The Structure of Rational Acceptance: Comments on Hawthorne and Bovens.Gregory R. Wheeler - 2005 - Synthese 144 (2):287-304.
    The structural view of rational acceptance is a commitment to developing a logical calculus to express rationally accepted propositions sufficient to represent valid argument forms constructed from rationally accepted formulas. This essay argues for this project by observing that a satisfactory solution to the lottery paradox and the paradox of the preface calls for a theory that both (i) offers the facilities to represent accepting less than certain propositions within an interpreted artificial language and (ii) provides a logical calculus of (...)
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  25.  51
    God, Genes, and Cognizing Agents.Gregory R. Peterson - 2000 - Zygon 35 (3):469-480.
    Much ink has been spilled on the claim that morality and religion have evolutionary roots. While some attempt to reduce morality and religion to biological considerations, others reject any link whatsoever. Any full account, however, must acknowledge the biological roots of human behavior while at the same time recognizing that our relatively unique capacity as cognitive agents requires orienting concepts of cosmic and human nature. While other organisms display quasi‐moral and proto‐moral behavior that is indeed relevant, fully moral behavior is (...)
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  26.  21
    Psychophysical scaling methods reveal and measure context effects.Gregory R. Lockhead - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (3):607-612.
    People cannot make independent judgements of stimulus attributes and so (Lockhead 1992, p. 551) rather than in terms of stimulus features. The new commentaries here further this statement and also support the observations in the target article that psychophysical scaling methods allow us to measure (1) how context determines judgments and (2) what people remember about prior stimuli.
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  27. Species of emergence.Gregory R. Peterson - 2006 - Zygon 41 (3):689-712.
  28.  28
    What Contemporary Virtue Ethics Might Learn from Aristotle’s Rhetoric.Gregory R. Beabout - 2013 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 87:155-166.
    In this paper, I extend contemporary virtue ethics by pointing to a philosophical insight that emerges from Aristotle’s Rhetoric: technical mastery of a discipline or practice involves cultivating the virtue of practical wisdom. After reviewing features of Alasdair MacIntyre’s virtue ethics, I draw attention to specific virtues identified by MacIntyre while noting the relative absence of the virtue of practical wisdom in his discussion of social practices. I compare and contrast MacIntyre’s virtue ethics with that of Aristotle. Focusing on Aristotle’s (...)
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  29.  60
    Stage-two secularity and the future of theology-and-science.Gregory R. Peterson - 2010 - Zygon 45 (2):506-516.
    Charles Taylor has recently provided an in-depth exploration of secularity, with a central characteristic being the understanding that religious commitment is optional. This essay extends this analysis, considering the possibility that American society may be entering a second stage of secularity, one in which the possibility of religious commitment ceases to be an option at all for many. The possible implications of such a development are considered for the theology-and-science dialogue.
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  30.  15
    Applied Professional Ethics: A Developmental Approach for Use with Case Studies.Gregory R. Beabout & Daryl J. Wennemann - 1993 - Upa.
    This innovative book is written in an accessible, compact style that sets forth and explains a sound framework for professional ethics that readers can quickly put into practice in analyzing and writing about cases. Through a series of moral conflicts, it aims at improving the skills of moral reasoning and achieving moral development.
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  31.  71
    Freedom and Its Misuses: Kierkegaard on Anxiety and Despair.Gregory R. Beabout - 1996
    Sheds light on the meaning of human freedom by examining and making clear the relationship between the concepts of anxiety and despair in the writings of Soren Kierkegaard. Drawing on Kierkegaard's The Concept of Anxiety and The Sickness Unto Death, the author provides detailed accounts on Kierkegaard's concepts of anxiety and despair, and discusses much secondary literature on these topics. What follows is an examination of Kierkegaardian feelings and moods, and freedom and individuality. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, (...)
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  32.  36
    Epistemology and artificial intelligence.Gregory R. Wheeler & Luís Moniz Pereira - 2004 - Journal of Applied Logic 2 (4):469-493.
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  33. Error statistics and Duhem's problem.Gregory R. Wheeler - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3):410-420.
    No one has a well developed solution to Duhem's problem, the problem of how experimental evidence warrants revision of our theories. Deborah Mayo proposes a solution to Duhem's problem in route to her more ambitious program of providing a philosophical account of inductive inference and experimental knowledge. This paper is a response to Mayo's Error Statistics (ES) program, paying particular attention to her response to Duhem's problem. It turns out that Mayo's purported solution to Duhem's problem is very significant to (...)
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  34. A hard problem indeed.Gregory R. Peterson - 2009 - Zygon 44 (1):19-29.
    Owen Flanagan's The Really Hard Problem provides a rich source of reflection on the question of meaning and ethics within the context of philosophical naturalism. I affirm the title's claim that the quest to find meaning in a purely physical universe is indeed a hard problem by addressing three issues: Flanagan's claim that there can be a scientific/empirical theory of ethics (eudaimonics), that ethics requires moral glue, and whether, in the end, Flanagan solves the hard problem. I suggest that he (...)
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  35.  59
    On McCauley's why religion is natural and science is not: Some further observations.Gregory R. Peterson - 2014 - Zygon 49 (3):716-727.
    Robert McCauley's Why Religion Is Natural and Science Is Not provides a summary interpretive statement of the standard model in cognitive science of religion, what I have previously called the HADD + ToM + Cultural Epidemiology model, along with a more general argument comparing religious cognition to scientific thinking and a novel framework for understanding both in terms of the concept of the maturationally natural. I here follow up on some observations made in a previous paper, developing them in light (...)
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  36.  57
    Religion as Orienting Worldview.Gregory R. Peterson - 2001 - Zygon 36 (1):5-19.
    Religions are complex, and any attempt at defining religion necessarily falls short. Nevertheless, any scholarly inquiry into the nature of religion must use some criteria in order to evaluate and study the character of religious traditions across contexts. To this end, I propose understanding religion in terms of an orienting worldview. Religions are worldviews that are expressed not only in beliefs but also in narratives and symbols. More than this, religions orient action, and any genuine religious tradition necessarily is concerned (...)
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  37.  66
    Illusion in Nature and Art.R. L. Gregory & E. H. Gombrich - 1975 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 34 (2):213-215.
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  38.  1
    Intelligent program analysis.Gregory R. Ruth - 1976 - Artificial Intelligence 7 (1):65-85.
  39.  19
    Constancy in a changing world.Gregory R. Lockhead - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (3):587-600.
  40.  15
    Emmert’s imaginal law.Gregory R. Lockhead & Nancy J. Evans - 1979 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 13 (2):114-116.
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  41.  37
    Isomorphisms and subjective colors.Gregory R. Lockhead & Scott A. Huettel - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (6):959-960.
    Palmer describes a “subjective barrier” that limits knowledge of others' experience. We discuss how this barrier extends to all knowledge, becoming less distinct as theoretical constructs are strengthened. We provide evidence for isomorphic experience, among individuals with similar physiologies, by showing that perceived relations between colors are as similar when viewing pigments as when viewing subjective colors caused by flickering bars.
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  42.  8
    Psychophysical measures of objects and their features: It is time for a change.Gregory R. Lockhead - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):766-772.
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  43.  18
    Psychophysical measures of objects and their features: It is time for a change.Gregory R. Lockhead - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):766-772.
  44.  89
    Is Eating Locally a Moral Obligation?Gregory R. Peterson - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (2):421-437.
    Advocates of eating locally offer a wide range of arguments in favor of the practice, but their ethical import is not always clear. Some locavore statements and arguments seem to imply a strong form of moral obligation; that eating locally is not merely instrumental to some other good, but has intrinsic value in its own right. This article examines standard arguments on behalf of eating locally, including arguments linked to the value of small farms and agrarianism, the environment, taste and (...)
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  45.  42
    Whither Theology and Science?Gregory R. Peterson - 2007 - Zygon 42 (3):583-586.
  46.  34
    Theology and the science wars: Who owns human nature?Gregory R. Peterson - 2006 - Zygon 41 (4):853-862.
  47.  48
    The created co‐creator: What it is and is not.Gregory R. Peterson - 2004 - Zygon 39 (4):827-840.
    In this article I briefly assesses Philip Hefner's concept of the created co-creator by considering both what it does and does not claim. Looking at issues of reductionism, biological selfishness, biology and freedom, and environmental ethics, I point out strengths and weaknesses in Hefner's conception of the created co-creator.
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  48.  50
    Whose Evolution? Which Theology?Gregory R. Peterson - 2000 - Zygon 35 (2):221-232.
    The importance of scientific conflicts for theology andphilosophy is difficult to judge. In many disputes of significance, prominent scientists can be found on both sides. Profound philosophical and religious implications are sometimes said to be implied by the new theory as well. This article examines the dispute over natural selection between Richard Dawkins and Stephen Jay Gould as a contemporary instance of such a conflict. While both claim that profound philosophical conclusions flow from their own alternativeaccount of evolution, I suggest (...)
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  49.  10
    Radical intellectuals and the subversion of progressive politics: the betrayal of politics.Gregory R. Smulewicz-Zucker & Michael Thompson (eds.) - 2015 - New York, NY: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Radical Intellectuals and the Subversion of Progressive Politics is a challenge to contemporary radical politics and political thought. This collection of essays critiques the dominant trends and figures on the left that have distorted the legacy of progressive politics, arguing that they have moved politics away from issues of class and economic power toward a preoccupation with culture and identity. The contributors discuss this new radicalism from the perspective of a more rational form of leftism capable of reviving interest in (...)
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  50. The phenomenon of Faust.Gregory R. Peterson Forty Years Later - forthcoming - Zygon.
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