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Gregory R. Peterson [54]Gregory Roy Peterson [1]
  1. Minding God: Theology and the Cognitive Sciences.Gregory R. Peterson - 2003
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  2.  62
    Is my feeling your pain bad for others? Empathy as virtue versus empathy as fixed trait.Gregory R. Peterson - 2017 - Zygon 52 (1):232-257.
    The purpose of this article is to critique the primary arguments given by Paul Bloom and Jesse Prinz against empathy, and to argue instead that empathy is best understood as a virtue that plays an important but complicated role in the moral life. That it is a virtue does not mean that it always functions well, and empathy sometimes contributes to behavior that is partial and unfair. In some of their writings, both Bloom and Prinz endorse the view that empathy (...)
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  3.  77
    In praise of folly? Theology and the university.Gregory R. Peterson - 2008 - Zygon 43 (3):563-577.
    To suppose the possibility of dialogue between theology and science is to suppose that theology is an intellectually worthy partner to engage in dialogue with science. The status of theology as a discipline, however, remains contested, one sign of which is the absence of theology from the university. I argue that a healthy theology-science dialogue would benefit from the presence of theology as an academic discipline in the university. Theology and theologians would benefit from the much closer contact with university (...)
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  4.  60
    Whither Panentheism?Gregory R. Peterson - 2001 - Zygon 36 (3):395-405.
    Panentheism has received widespread support among theologians involved in the religion‐science dialogue, due in no small part to the success with which panentheism addresses a range of issues. Nevertheless, panentheism as a theological premise needs continued development and elucidation. Panentheism is often presented as a theoretical model of the God‐world relationship, yet the supporting arguments rely on metaphors that are varied and open‐ended. Analogy from the mind‐body relationship leads to a “weak” panentheism that emphasizes the presence of God, while whole‐part (...)
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  5.  60
    The Evolution of Consciousness and the Theology of Nature.Gregory R. Peterson - 1999 - Zygon 34 (2):283-306.
    Theology and philosophy have traditionally assumed a radical split between human beings and the rest of creation. Philosophically, the split is usually justified in terms of a locus humanus, some one cognitive trait that human beings possess and nonhuman animals do not. Theologically, this trait is usually identified as that which makes us in the image of God. Research in animal cognition, however, suggests that we are not unique in as many respects as we think we are. This suggests that (...)
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  6.  15
    In Praise of Folly? Theology and the University.Gregory R. Peterson & Nicholaos Jones - 2008 - Zygon 43 (3):563-577.
    Abstract.To suppose the possibility of dialogue between theology and science is to suppose that theology is an intellectually worthy partner to engage in dialogue with science. The status of theology as a discipline, however, remains contested, one sign of which is the absence of theology from the university. I argue that a healthy theology‐science dialogue would benefit from the presence of theology as an academic discipline in the university. Theology and theologians would benefit from the much closer contact with university (...)
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  7.  70
    Uniqueness, the image of God, and the problem of method: Engaging Van huyssteen.Gregory R. Peterson - 2008 - Zygon 43 (2):467-474.
    Wentzel van Huyssteen's book Alone in the World? provides a thoughtful and nuanced account of human evolution from a theological perspective. Not only does his work provide what is perhaps the only sustained theological reflection specifically on human evolution, but his working through of many of the issues, particularly on the image of God literature in theology, has few parallels. Despite this, I focus on what I consider to be several weaknesses of the text, including areas of theological method, theological (...)
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  8.  68
    Demarcation and the Scientistic Fallacy.Gregory R. Peterson - 2003 - Zygon 38 (4):751-761.
    For many theologians and philosophers, scientism is among the greatest of intellectual sins. In its most commonly cited form, scientism consists in claiming that science is the only source of real knowledge and, therefore, that what science does not discover does not exist. Because the charge of scientism is frequently levied, it is important to be clear about what exactly is being claimed in its name. I argue that scientism can best be understood as a fallacy, specifically as a kind (...)
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  9.  54
    God, Genes, and Cognizing Agents.Gregory R. Peterson - 2000 - Zygon 35 (3):469-480.
    Much ink has been spilled on the claim that morality and religion have evolutionary roots. While some attempt to reduce morality and religion to biological considerations, others reject any link whatsoever. Any full account, however, must acknowledge the biological roots of human behavior while at the same time recognizing that our relatively unique capacity as cognitive agents requires orienting concepts of cosmic and human nature. While other organisms display quasi‐moral and proto‐moral behavior that is indeed relevant, fully moral behavior is (...)
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  10. Are evolutionary/cognitive theories of religion relevant for philosophy of religion?Gregory R. Peterson - 2010 - Zygon 45 (3):545-557.
    Biological theories of religious belief are sometimes understood to undermine the very beliefs they are describing, proposing an alternative explanation for the causes of belief different from that given by religious believers themselves. This article surveys three categories of biological theorizing derived from evolutionary biology, cognitive science of religion, and neuroscience. Although each field raises important issues and in some cases potential challenges to the legitimacy of religious belief, in most cases the significance of these theories for the holding of (...)
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  11. Species of emergence.Gregory R. Peterson - 2006 - Zygon 41 (3):689-712.
  12.  64
    Stage-two secularity and the future of theology-and-science.Gregory R. Peterson - 2010 - Zygon 45 (2):506-516.
    Charles Taylor has recently provided an in-depth exploration of secularity, with a central characteristic being the understanding that religious commitment is optional. This essay extends this analysis, considering the possibility that American society may be entering a second stage of secularity, one in which the possibility of religious commitment ceases to be an option at all for many. The possible implications of such a development are considered for the theology-and-science dialogue.
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  13. A hard problem indeed.Gregory R. Peterson - 2009 - Zygon 44 (1):19-29.
    Owen Flanagan's The Really Hard Problem provides a rich source of reflection on the question of meaning and ethics within the context of philosophical naturalism. I affirm the title's claim that the quest to find meaning in a purely physical universe is indeed a hard problem by addressing three issues: Flanagan's claim that there can be a scientific/empirical theory of ethics (eudaimonics), that ethics requires moral glue, and whether, in the end, Flanagan solves the hard problem. I suggest that he (...)
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  14.  63
    On McCauley's why religion is natural and science is not: Some further observations.Gregory R. Peterson - 2014 - Zygon 49 (3):716-727.
    Robert McCauley's Why Religion Is Natural and Science Is Not provides a summary interpretive statement of the standard model in cognitive science of religion, what I have previously called the HADD + ToM + Cultural Epidemiology model, along with a more general argument comparing religious cognition to scientific thinking and a novel framework for understanding both in terms of the concept of the maturationally natural. I here follow up on some observations made in a previous paper, developing them in light (...)
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  15.  61
    Religion as Orienting Worldview.Gregory R. Peterson - 2001 - Zygon 36 (1):5-19.
    Religions are complex, and any attempt at defining religion necessarily falls short. Nevertheless, any scholarly inquiry into the nature of religion must use some criteria in order to evaluate and study the character of religious traditions across contexts. To this end, I propose understanding religion in terms of an orienting worldview. Religions are worldviews that are expressed not only in beliefs but also in narratives and symbols. More than this, religions orient action, and any genuine religious tradition necessarily is concerned (...)
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  16.  89
    Is Eating Locally a Moral Obligation?Gregory R. Peterson - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (2):421-437.
    Advocates of eating locally offer a wide range of arguments in favor of the practice, but their ethical import is not always clear. Some locavore statements and arguments seem to imply a strong form of moral obligation; that eating locally is not merely instrumental to some other good, but has intrinsic value in its own right. This article examines standard arguments on behalf of eating locally, including arguments linked to the value of small farms and agrarianism, the environment, taste and (...)
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  17.  45
    Whither Theology and Science?Gregory R. Peterson - 2007 - Zygon 42 (3):583-586.
  18.  37
    Theology and the science wars: Who owns human nature?Gregory R. Peterson - 2006 - Zygon 41 (4):853-862.
  19.  52
    The created co‐creator: What it is and is not.Gregory R. Peterson - 2004 - Zygon 39 (4):827-840.
    In this article I briefly assesses Philip Hefner's concept of the created co-creator by considering both what it does and does not claim. Looking at issues of reductionism, biological selfishness, biology and freedom, and environmental ethics, I point out strengths and weaknesses in Hefner's conception of the created co-creator.
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  20.  53
    Whose Evolution? Which Theology?Gregory R. Peterson - 2000 - Zygon 35 (2):221-232.
    The importance of scientific conflicts for theology andphilosophy is difficult to judge. In many disputes of significance, prominent scientists can be found on both sides. Profound philosophical and religious implications are sometimes said to be implied by the new theory as well. This article examines the dispute over natural selection between Richard Dawkins and Stephen Jay Gould as a contemporary instance of such a conflict. While both claim that profound philosophical conclusions flow from their own alternativeaccount of evolution, I suggest (...)
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  21.  23
    Can One Love the Distant Other? Empathy, Affiliation, and Cosmopolitanism.Gregory R. Peterson - 2015 - Philosophy, Theology and the Sciences 2 (1):4.
  22.  66
    Cognitive science: What one needs to know.Gregory R. Peterson - 1997 - Zygon 32 (4):615-627.
    Cognitive science is a new paradigm that informs and involves several disciplines, including artificial intelligence, neuroscience, cognitive psychology, cognitive ethology, and the philosophy of mind. Cognitive science studies the mind as an information processor, with the computer often operating as a metaphor for the operations of the mind. Developments in the cognitive sciences stand to affect tremendously how we think of the mind and, consequently, how we think of theological and religious claims that concern the human subject. The unity of (...)
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  23.  44
    Theology: Reduction or Autonomy?Gregory R. Peterson - 2001 - Zygon 36 (4):597-614.
    Issues of the nature and task of theology remain important to the science‐theology dialogue. This paper lays out a framework for understanding the nature of theology in relation to the other sciences. In particular, I argue that the primary question remains one of autonomy and reduction. If theology is a genuine academic discipline, then it should be an autonomous field with its own subject matter and norms. Wolfhart Pannenberg argues that theology is the science of God, but I suggest that (...)
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  24. Being conscious of Marc Bekoff: Thinking of animal self-consciousness.Gregory R. Peterson - 2003 - Zygon 38 (2):247-256.
    The preceding article by Marc Bekoff reveals much about our current understanding of animal self-consciousness and its implications. It also reveals how much more there is to be said and considered. This response briefly examines animal self-consciousness from scientific, moral, and theological perspectives. As Bekoff emphasizes, self-consciousness is not one thing but many. Consequently, our moral relationship to animals is not simply one based on a graded hierarchy of abilities. Furthermore, the complexity of animal self-awareness can serve as stimulus for (...)
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  25. The Matter of Religion and Science: Response to Huston Smith.Gregory R. Peterson - 2001 - Zygon 36 (2):215-222.
    Huston Smith's Why Religion Matters is the culminating reflections of one of the most respected religion scholars of our day. In this work, Smith sees modern society to be in the midst of a spiritual crisis. According to Smith, this crisis has been brought about by the advance of science and the inroads into what Smith calls the traditional worldview. While Smith's work is of some importance, I believe that several of its fundamental claims are mistaken. Smith often does not (...)
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  26. Going Public: Science‐and‐Religion at a Crossroads.Gregory R. Peterson - 2000 - Zygon 35 (1):13-24.
    A survey of recent news events involving science and religion is conducted with an aim toward analyzing the current state of the science and religion dialogue. Recent events suggest that the dialogue has come to a crossroads, achieving an unprecedented level of popular attention. At the same time, this attention reveals what still needs to be done. More attention needs to be given to the nature of religion, to the history of religion and science, and to the increasing plurality of (...)
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  27.  18
    Martha C. Nussbaum, Anger and Forgiveness: Resentment, Generosity, Justice.Gregory R. Peterson - 2021 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 18 (3):315-318.
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  28. What Shall We Make ofWolfhart Pannenberg? A Symposium on Beginning with the End: God, Science, and Wolfliart Pannenberg (eds., Carol.Rausch Albright, Joel Haugen & Gregory R. Peterson - 1999 - Zygon 34 (1):139.
  29. Henry Stapp on quantum mechanics, spirit, mind, and moralitv.Antje JackklEn, Philip Clayton & Gregory R. Peterson - 2006 - Zygon 41 (3-4):776.
     
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  30. Science looks at spirituality David hay and spirituality as a natural phenomenon: Bringing Pawel M. Socha biological and psychological perspectives together Ellen Goldberg cognitive science and hathayoga.Harold J. Morowitz, Charley D. Hardwick, Ann Pederson, Gregory R. Peterson, Karl E. Peters, Nicole Schmitz-Moormann, James F. Salmon, S. J. Paul H. Carr, Michael W. DeLashmutt & James E. Huchingson - 2005 - Zygon 40 (3-4):788.
     
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  31. Do split brains listen to prozac?Gregory R. Peterson - 2004 - Zygon 39 (3):555-576.
    . Cognitive science challenges our understandings of self and freedom. In this article, adapted from a chapter in Minding God: Theology and the Cognitive Sciences , I review some of the scientific literature with regard to issues of self and freedom. I argue that our sense of self is a construct and heavily dependent on the kind of brain that we have. Furthermore, understanding the issue of freedom requires an understanding of the findings of cognitive science. Human beings are constrained (...)
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  32.  52
    Dancing with Karl Peters.Gregory R. Peterson - 2005 - Zygon 40 (3):691-700.
    Dancing with the Sacred by Karl Peters provides a coherent and at times moving portrait of the religious naturalist position. I highlight three broad issues that are raised by the kind of religious naturalism that Peters develops: (1) the meaning of the term natural, (2) the nature of God in Peters's naturalistic framework, and (3) the question of eschatology. In each area, I believe that Peters's work raises many questions that need to be addressed and also provides openings for further (...)
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  33.  39
    Emergence and Supervenience.Gregory R. Peterson - 2002 - Tradition and Discovery 29 (3):23-27.
    Philip Clayton has put forth a clear and important position regarding the mind-body relationship in terms of supervenient and emergent realities. While I agree with Clayton on many points, I argue that there are important problems with current literature on supervenience and emergence. In particular, I distinguish between closed system emergence and open system emergence, suggesting that Clayton’s position is closer to the latter than the former.
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  34.  23
    Empathy, Compassion, Love Perspectives on the Science of Morality.Gregory R. Peterson - 2015 - Philosophy, Theology and the Sciences 2 (1):1-3.
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  35.  55
    Forty years later: What have we accomplished?Gregory R. Peterson - 2005 - Zygon 40 (4):875-890.
    I examine the responses to John Caiazza's “Athens, Jerusalem, and the Arrival of Techno‐Secularism” as part of Zygon's forty‐year anniversary symposium. The responses reveal that issues of modernism and postmodernism are central to understanding the dynamic of the current science‐religion/theology dialogue and that the resistance of many of the participants to the influences of postmodernism is a sign not of its backwardness but rather of some of the weaknesses inherent in the postmodern project. This does not mean that the many (...)
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  36.  58
    God, Determinism, and Action: Perspectives from Physics.Gregory R. Peterson - 2000 - Zygon 35 (4):881-890.
    Recent articles by Michael Heller, Carl Helrich, Peter Hodgson, Jeffrey Koperski, and Nicholas Saunders present a challenge to much current thinking on God, divine action, and cosmology. In the process, they also reveal underlying assumptions and current problems, especially in the debate over physics and divine action. In particular, three issues come up that need to be addressed further. First, what is the status of determinism, and what can physics contribute? Second, what kind of divine action are we talking about? (...)
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  37. God Soul Mind Brain: A Neuroscientist's Reflections on the Spirit World by Michael S.A. Graziano.Gregory R. Peterson - 2011 - Zygon 46 (2):503-504.
  38.  14
    Habits in Mind: Integrating Theology, Philosophy, and the Cognitive Science of Virtue, Emotion, and Character Formation.Gregory R. Peterson & Kevin S. Reimer (eds.) - 2017 - Boston: Brill.
    This volume explores the role of both "mere habits" and sophisticated habitus in the formation of moral character and the virtues, incorporating perspectives from philosophy, theology, psychology, and neuroscience.
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  39.  15
    Habits in Mind: Integrating Theology, Philosophy, and the Cognitive Science of Virtue, Emotion, and Character Formation.Gregory R. Peterson, James van Slyke, Michael Spezio & Kevin Reimer (eds.) - 2017 - Boston: BRILL.
    This volume explores the role of both “mere habits” and sophisticated habitus in the formation of moral character and the virtues, incorporating perspectives from philosophy, theology, psychology, and neuroscience.
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  40.  56
    Minds and Bodies: Human and Divine.Gregory R. Peterson - 1997 - Zygon 32 (2):189-206.
    Does God have a mind? Western theism has traditionally construed God as an intentional agent who acts on creation and in relation to humankind. God loves, punishes, and redeems. God's intentionality has traditionally been construed in analogy to human intentionality, which in turn has often presumed a supernatural dualism. Developments in cognitive science, however, render supernatural dualism suspect for explaining the human mind. How, then, can we speak of the mind of God? Borrowing from Daniel Dennett's intentional stance, I suggest (...)
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  41.  44
    MindingMinding God: A Response to Spezio and Bielfeldt.Gregory R. Peterson - 2004 - Zygon 39 (3):605-614.
  42.  64
    Maintaining respectability: Response to nicholaos Jones.Gregory R. Peterson - 2008 - Zygon 43 (3):593-598.
    Nicholaos Jones argues that theology is not a respectable discipline because of its inability to meet the standards of contemporary science. Although Jones makes a bold claim, I suggest that he has not made his case by focusing on the question of defining science and metaphysics appropriately, the analysis of the literature he cites, and his central claim that theology presupposes the absolute certainty of God.
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  43.  64
    Mysterium Tremendum.Gregory R. Peterson - 2002 - Zygon 37 (2):237-254.
    In recent years, interest in the scientific basis of religious experience has resurged. In particular, research and publications by V. S. Ramachandran and by Eugene d’Aquili and Andrew Newberg have sparked considerable curiosity and debate over the reality and basis of religious experience. This article puts such research into a broader context and examines the extent to which scientific research supports or undermines particular religious and theological claims. I argue that such experiments show that religious experience has some biological basis (...)
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  44.  78
    Rethinking Human Nature: A Multidisciplinary Approach, By Malcolm Jeeves.Gregory R. Peterson - 2012 - Zygon 47 (1):241-243.
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  45.  14
    Science, Religion, and Secularity.Gregory R. Peterson - 2017 - Philosophy, Theology and the Sciences 4 (1):1.
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  46. Think pieces.Gregory R. Peterson, Religious Metaphor Ursula Goodenough, What Is Religious Naturalism, Vajrayana Art & Iconography Jensine Andresen - 2000 - Zygon 35 (2):217.
  47.  55
    What Does Silicon Valley Have to Do with Jerusalem?Gregory R. Peterson - 2004 - Zygon 39 (3):541-554.
    . Adapted from the introductory chapter of Minding God: Theology and the Cognitive Sciences , I here lay out a general approach for a dialogue between theology and cognitive science. Key to this task is an understanding of theology as the science or study of meaning and purpose. I give reasons why theology should be thought of in this sense and the potential fruitfulness of this approach.
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  48.  35
    Where Do We Go from Here?Gregory R. Peterson - 1999 - Zygon 34 (1):139-149.
    Beginning with the End represents an excellent collection of articles devoted to the thought of Wolfhart Pannenberg. This volume includes many of the most important thinkers in the science‐religion dialogue and shows as well the importance and impact of Pannenberg's theology. This response addresses themes that surface in several of the articles: What is religion? What is science? What is theology? What is God? On some of these themes there is agreement, on others sharp disagreement. The conclusion also considers what (...)
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  49. Why the New Atheism Shouldn't Be (Completely) Dismissed.Gregory R. Peterson - 2007 - Zygon 42 (4):803-806.
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  50.  52
    Review of Michael Martin, ed., the cambridge companion to atheism. [REVIEW]Gregory R. Peterson - 2009 - Sophia 48 (4):509-510.
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