24 found
Order:
  1.  12
    Public Deliberation about Gene Editing in the Wild.Michael K. Gusmano, Gregory E. Kaebnick, Karen J. Maschke, Carolyn P. Neuhaus & Ben Curran Wills - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (S2):2-10.
    The release of genetically engineered organisms into the shared environment raises scientific, ethical, and societal issues. Using some form of democratic deliberation to provide the public with a voice on the policies that govern these technologies is important, but there has not been enough attention to how we should connect public deliberation to the existing regulatory process. Drawing on lessons from previous public deliberative efforts by U.S. federal agencies, we identify several practical issues that will need to be addressed if (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2.  7
    Justice, Bioethics, and Covid‐19.Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (6):2-2.
    Both articles in the November‐December 2021 issue of the Hastings Center Report reflect bioethics’ growing interest in questions of justice, or more generally, questions of how collective interests constrain individual interests. Hugh Desmond argues that human enhancement should be reconsidered in light of developments in the field of human evolution. Contemporary understandings in this area lead, he argues, to a new way of thinking about the ethics of enhancement—an approach that replaces personal autonomy with group benefit as the primary criterion (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3.  8
    Heart and Soul.Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (1):2-2.
    The lead article in this January‐February 2021 issue—the first of the Hastings Center Report's fiftieth year of publication—does not set out to change medicine. It tries instead to understand it. In “A Heart without Life: Artificial Organs and the Lived Body,” Mary Jean Walker draws on work in phenomenology and on empirical research with people who have received artificial heart devices to argue that such devices may have two very different effects on how a patient experiences the body and the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  9
    Editors’ Statement on the Responsible Use of Generative AI Technologies in Scholarly Journal Publishing.Gregory E. Kaebnick, David Christopher Magnus, Audiey Kao, Mohammad Hosseini, David Resnik, Veljko Dubljević, Christy Rentmeester, Bert Gordijn & Mark J. Cherry - forthcoming - American Journal of Bioethics:1-4.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  15
    Editors’ Statement on the Responsible Use of Generative AI Technologies in Scholarly Journal Publishing.Gregory E. Kaebnick, David Christopher Magnus, Audiey Kao, Mohammad Hosseini, David Resnik, Veljko Dubljević, Christy Rentmeester, Bert Gordijn & Mark J. Cherry - 2023 - Hastings Center Report 53 (5):3-6.
    Generative artificial intelligence (AI) has the potential to transform many aspects of scholarly publishing. Authors, peer reviewers, and editors might use AI in a variety of ways, and those uses might augment their existing work or might instead be intended to replace it. We are editors of bioethics and humanities journals who have been contemplating the implications of this ongoing transformation. We believe that generative AI may pose a threat to the goals that animate our work but could also be (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  14
    Editors' statement on the responsible use of generative artificial intelligence technologies in scholarly journal publishing.Gregory E. Kaebnick, David Christopher Magnus, Audiey Kao, Mohammad Hosseini, David Resnik, Veljko Dubljević, Christy Rentmeester & Bert Gordijn - 2023 - Bioethics 37 (9):825-828.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  13
    Editors' statement on the responsible use of generative artificial intelligence technologies in scholarly journal publishing.Gregory E. Kaebnick, David Christopher Magnus, Audiey Kao, Mohammad Hosseini, David Resnik, Veljko Dubljević, Christy Rentmeester, Bert Gordijn & Mark J. Cherry - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (4):296-299.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  7
    Editors’ Statement on the Responsible Use of Generative AI Technologies in Scholarly Journal Publishing.Gregory E. Kaebnick, David Christopher Magnus, Audiey Kao, Mohammad Hosseini, David Resnik, Veljko Dubljević, Christy Rentmeester, Bert Gordijn & Mark J. Cherry - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 14 (4):337-340.
    The new generative artificial intelligence (AI) tools, and especially the large language models (LLMs) of which ChatGPT is the most prominent example, have the potential to transform many aspects o...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  5
    Trust in Health Care and Science: Toward Common Ground on Key Concepts.Lauren A. Taylor, Mildred Z. Solomon & Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2023 - Hastings Center Report 53 (S2):2-8.
    This essay summarizes key insights across the essays in the Hastings Center Report's special report “Time to Rebuild: Essays on Trust in Health Care and Science.” These insights concern trust and trustworthiness as distinct concepts, competence as a necessary but not sufficient input to trust, trust as a reciprocal good, trust as an interpersonal as well as structural phenomena, the ethical impermissibility of seeking to win trust without being trustworthy, building and borrowing trust as distinct strategies, and challenges to trustworthiness (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  5
    Bioethics and Addiction.Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (4):2-2.
    Bioethicists have sometimes regarded the opioid epidemic as a problem with obvious answers and thus no need for the field's conceptual analysis. Yet, as three essays in the July‐August 2020 issue of the Hastings Center Report demonstrate, the opioid crisis contains a knot of distinctions and puzzles to be sorted out. Travis N. Rieder examines, for example, what is fundamentally driving the crisis—access to the drugs or large societal problems such as poverty and joblessness. The role of choice in addiction, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  4
    Choosing to Die.Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2022 - Hastings Center Report 52 (5):2-2.
    Hastings Center Report, Volume 52, Issue 5, Page 2-2, September–October 2022.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  10
    Ethicists and Activists.Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (4):2-2.
    In some sense, argues Christopher Meyers in the lead article in this, the July‐August 2021, issue of the Hastings Center Report, to be a good ethicist is to be an activist. The question for the ethicist, and for Meyers, is about how hard and far to push: how much personal risk to shoulder, how much to tick off colleagues, how much institutional disruption to create, how much to look like an angry protester. Meyers argues for aiming at the middle, in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  4
    Ethics and Structure.Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2022 - Hastings Center Report 52 (2):2-2.
    Hastings Center Report, Volume 52, Issue 2, Page 2-2, March‐April 2022.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  9
    Editorial Trends.Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (1):2-2.
    I was recently asked to report on editorial trends in the Hastings Center Report, past and future. What I reported is that HCR has been going in two seemingly contrasting directions. One has to do with moral decision‐making in clinical ethics—the core theme in bioethics for fifty years, but still developing. A second editorial trend is treatment of larger social and political issues that bear on health, such as public health interventions and access to health care. I could also have (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  5
    Healing Relationships.Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (5):2-2.
    In a 2015 Hastings Center Report essay, Robert Truog and his coauthors argued that the clinical ethics portion of medical education should cast both a wider and a finer net than is sometimes realized. Many of the morally important moments in patient care are missed if we teach only general moral principles, they held; we also need to give attention to an indefinite stream of “microethical” decisions in everyday clinical practice. In the current issue, Truog plays out a similar theme (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  18
    IRB Becomes E&HR.Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (1):2-2.
    I was recently asked to report on editorial trends in the Hastings Center Report, past and future. What I reported is that HCR has been going in two seemingly contrasting directions. One has to do with moral decision‐making in clinical ethics—the core theme in bioethics for fifty years, but still developing. A second editorial trend is treatment of larger social and political issues that bear on health, such as public health interventions and access to health care. I could also have (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  7
    Learning Health Systems, Informed Consent, and Respect for Persons.Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2022 - Hastings Center Report 52 (3):2-2.
    Hastings Center Report, Volume 52, Issue 3, Page 2-2, May–June 2022.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  1
    Neuroscience and Society: Supporting and Unsettling Public Engagement.Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2024 - Hastings Center Report 54 (1):20-23.
    Advancing neuroscience is one of many topics that pose a challenge often called “the alignment problem”—the challenge, that is, of assuring that science policy is responsive to and in some sense squares with the public's values. This issue of the Hastings Center Report launches a series of scholarly essays and articles on the ethical and social issues raised by this vast body of medical research and bench science. The series, which will run under the banner “Neuroscience and Society,” is supported (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  7
    The Crisis in Standards of Care.Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (5):2-2.
    Hastings Center Report, Volume 51, Issue 5, Page 2-2, September‐October 2021.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  6
    Third Parties.Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (6):2-2.
    The lead article in the Hastings Center Report's November‐December 2020 issue reconsiders the rationale for requiring that patients have a prescription from a physician to obtain a drug. Madison Kilbride, Steve Joffe, and Holly Fernandez Lynch conclude that growing respect for patient autonomy should lead to a new default for drug access: drugs should be available over the counter unless there are special concerns about harms to third parties or about patients' ability to make decisions for themselves. This conclusion would (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  7
    Variations on Consent.Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (2):2-2.
    Two articles in the March‐April 2021 issue of the Hastings Center Report consider alterations to traditional informed consent. In “The Consent Continuum: A New Model of Consent, Assent, and Nondissent for Primary Care,” Marc Tunzi and colleagues argue that, in primary care settings, patient consent should be understood as taking a range of forms depending on the procedure, the patient, and the patient‐care context. Traditional informed consent is at the ceremonious end; for many things done in these settings, the authors (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  6
    Words Matter.Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (5):2-2.
    The lead article in this, the September‐October 2020, issue of the Hastings Center Report considers the use of metaphors in communications with clinicians and patients.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  11
    Civic Learning for a Democracy in Crisis.Bruce Jennings, Michael K. Gusmano, Gregory E. Kaebnick, Carolyn P. Neuhaus & Mildred Z. Solomon - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (S1):2-4.
    This essay introduces a special report from The Hastings Center entitled Democracy in Crisis: Civic Learning and the Reconstruction of Common Purpose, which grew out of a project supported by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. This multiauthored report offers wide‐ranging assessments of increasing polarization and partisanship in American government and politics, and it proposes constructive responses to this in the provision of objective information, institutional reforms in government and the electoral system, and a reexamination of cultural and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  5
    Real-life Bioethics.Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2011 - Hastings Center Report 41 (6):2-2.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Real-life BioethicsGregory E. KaebnickMy academic training is in philosophy, and I tend to see the problems in bioethics as philosophical problems. And so they often are. What are moral values? What is the nature of rationality? These are certainly philosophical problems. But at the same time, they are not strictly philosophical problems, insofar as they are not the special purview of the field of philosophy. They require a broader (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark