Results for 'Gregory A. Light'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  53
    Probing cortico-cortical interactions that underlie the multiple sensory, cognitive, and everyday functional deficits in schizophrenia.Gregory A. Light - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):799-799.
    Schizophrenia patients exhibit impairments across multiple clinical, cognitive, and functional domains. A fundamental abnormality of the timing and/or efficiency of neural processes across disparate brain regions (i.e., cortico-cortical communications) may underlie many of the deficits in schizophrenia. Because gamma synchrony is temporally correlated with many cognitive processes, probing patterns of gamma activation may shed light on the functional integrity of neural circuits in schizophrenia and related disorders.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  20
    Edward Harold Fulcher Swain's Vision of Forest Modernity.Gregory A. Barton & Brett M. Bennett - 2011 - Intellectual History Review 21 (2):135-150.
    Edward Harold Fulcher Swain (1883?1970) developed a unique idea about the importance of forests, advocating the creation of a new society based upon forests, and he pursued policies to implement his unique vision of forestry when he served as the Director of Queensland's Forestry Board from 1918 to 1924 and the Forestry Commissioner for New South Wales from 1935 to 1948. Swain's beliefs developed out of a combination of his Australian experiences and connections with foresters in the British Empire and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Portraits of Pioneers in Psychology: Volume Iii.Michael Wertheimer & Gregory A. Kimble (eds.) - 1998 - Psychology Press.
    This third volume in a series devoted to luminaries in the history of psychology--features chapter authors who are themselves highly visible and eminent scholars. They provide glimpses of the giants who shaped modern cognitive and behavioral science, and shed new light on their contributions and personalities, often with a touch of humor or whimsy and with fresh personal insights. The animated style, carefully selected details, and lively perspective make the people, ideas, and controversies in the history of psychology come (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. ‘Two Dogmas’ -- All Bark and No Bite?: Carnap and Quine on Analyticity.Paul A. Gregory - 2003 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (3):633 - 648.
    Recently O'Grady argued that Quine's "Two Dogmas" misses its mark when Carnap's use of the analyticity distinction is understood in the light of his deflationism. While in substantial agreement with the stress on Carnap's deflationism, I argue that O'Grady is not sufficiently sensitive to the difference between using the analyticity distinction to support deflationism, and taking a deflationary attitude towards the distinction itself; the latter being much more controversial. Being sensitive to this difference, and viewing Quine as having reason (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. ‘Two Dogmas’ -- All Bark and No Bite?: Carnap and Quine on Analyticity.Paul A. Gregory - 2003 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (3):633–648.
    Recently O’Grady argued that Quine’s “Two Dogmas” misses its mark when Carnap’s use of the analyticity distinction is understood in the light of his deflationism. While in substantial agreement with the stress on Carnap’s deflationism, I argue that O’Grady is not sufficiently sensitive to the difference between using the analyticity distinction to support deflationism, and taking a deflationary attitude towards the distinction itself; the latter being much more controversial. Being sensitive to this difference, and viewing Quine as having reason (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  45
    Management as a Domain-Relative Practice that Requires and Develops Practical Wisdom.Gregory R. Beabout - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (2):405-432.
    ABSTRACT:Although Alasdair MacIntyre has criticized both the market economy and applied ethics, his writing has generated significant discussion within the literature of business ethics and organizational studies. In this article, I extend this conversation by proposing the use of MacIntyre’s account of the virtues to conceive of management as a domain-relative practice that requires and develops practical wisdom. I proceed in four steps. First, I explain MacIntyre’s account of the virtues in light of his definition of a “practice.” Second, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   59 citations  
  7.  16
    Collective Responsibility.Gregory F. Mellema - 1997 - Brill | Rodopi.
    Groups of people are commonly said to be collectively responsible for what has happened. Sometimes the groups claimed to be responsible are vast in size, as when collective responsibility is ascribed to the class of all Americans or the class of all white males. In this book the concept of collective responsibility is analyzed. It is examined not only in the light of what philosophical proponents have said about it, but a genuine attempt is made to make sense of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  8.  15
    A Fourth View Concerning Persistence.Gregory Fowler - manuscript
    This unpublished paper, which readers should feel free to cite, is posted primarily for the historical record. In recent work that has, deservedly, received some attention, Paul R. Daniels presents and defends a non-standard theory of persistence that he dubs transdurantism, according to which persisting objects are temporally extended simples. This is exactly what I do in work dating back to 2004. (This work began with an earlier draft of this paper, which was presented to the University of Rochester's Philosophy (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. Chapter Nine Is Love an Affection or an Emotion? Looking at Wesley's Heart Language in a New Light Gregory S. Clapper.Gregory S. Clapper - 2007 - In Thomas Jay Oord (ed.), The Many Facets of Love: Philosophical Explorations. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 75.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10.  42
    Psychophysical scaling: Judgments of attributes or objects?Gregory R. Lockhead - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (3):543-558.
    Psychophysical scaling models of the form R = f, with R the response and I some intensity of an attribute, all assume that people judge the amounts of an attribute. With simple biases excepted, most also assume that judgments are independent of space, time, and features of the situation other than the one being judged. Many data support these ideas: Magnitude estimations of brightness increase with luminance. Nevertheless, I argue that the general model is wrong. The stabilized retinal image literature (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   51 citations  
  11. Can a Darwinian Be a Christian?Gregory W. Dawes - 2007 - Religion Compass 1 (6):711-24.
    A number of recent historians claim to have defeated what they call the ‘conflict thesis’, the idea that there exists some inevitable conflict between Darwinism and Christianity. This is often thought to be part of a broader ‘warfare thesis’, which posits an inevitable conflict between science and religion. But, all they have defeated is one, relatively uninteresting form of this thesis. There remain other forms of the conflict theses that remain entirely plausible, even in light of the historical record.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  12.  8
    The Logic of Normative Justification.Gregory Carneiro - 2019 - Felsefe Arkivi 51:79-115.
    What really makes the concepts of obligation or permission so important for practical philosophy? What if we could find a better concept, one that, despite the simplicity, could show itself as intuitive and rich as possible? Could justifications be used in common language and practice as a sign of ethical judgment and as a strong motive for action? In most scenarios, for example, it really doesn’t matter if a given action is obliged, permitted or forbidden, one may perform the action (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  13.  25
    Invertebrate cytokines: The phylogenetic emergence of interleukin‐1.Gregory Beck, Robert F. O'Brien & Gail S. Habicht - 1989 - Bioessays 11 (2-3):62-67.
    Cytokines are polypeptides released by activated vertebrate blood cells which have profound effects on other blood cells and which have hormone‐like properties affecting other organ systems as well. In recent years a wide variety of these mediators has been isolated and characterized. Many of these molecules have subsequently been cloned and expressed in E. coli. The tremendous importance of these proteins to host immune and non‐specific defense systems along with the striking similarities of their properties among different species suggested to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  13
    Mill and Paternalism.Gregory Claeys - 2013 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Many discussions of J. S. Mill's concept of liberty focus too narrowly on On Liberty and fail to acknowledge that his treatment of related issues elsewhere may modify its leading doctrines. Mill and Paternalism demonstrates how a contextual reading suggests that in Principles of Political Economy, and also his writings on Ireland, India and on domestic issues like land reform, Mill proposed a substantially more interventionist account of the state than On Liberty seems to imply. This helps to explain Mill's (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  15. Less proof, more truth.Gregory Chaitin - manuscript
    MATHEMATICS is a wonderful, mad subject, full of imagination, fantasy and creativity that is not limited by the petty details of the physical world, but only by the strength of our inner light. Does this sound familiar? Probably not from the mathematics classes you may have attended. But consider the work of three famous earlier mathematicians: Leonhard Euler, Georg Cantor and Srinivasa Ramanujan.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Best explanationism and justification for beliefs about the future.Gregory Stoutenburg - 2015 - Episteme 12 (4):429-437.
    Earl Conee and Richard Feldman have recently argued that the evidential support relation should be understood in terms of explanatory coherence: roughly, one's evidence supports a proposition if and only if that proposition is part of the best available explanation of the evidence. Their thesis has been criticized through alleged counterexamples, perhaps the most important of which are cases where a subject has a justified belief about the future. Kevin McCain has defended the thesis against Byerly's counterexample. I argue that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  17.  52
    Saving Creativity in Whitehead and Saving Whitehead through Zhu Xi.Gregory Aisemberg - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (4):1149-1173.
    At the fore of concern within Whitehead scholarship are the main interpretive issues revolving around the relationships of God, creativity, and the world. Some critics have charged that Whitehead’s mature thought suffers from a lack of coherence in his formulation of the relationship between God and creativity as they function in cosmic generativity, a charge proven difficult to overcome. Such critics have posed the following question. In light of Whitehead’s commitment to the Ontological Principle, how can God and creativity (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  40
    The Philosophy of Forgiveness - Volume IV: Christian Perspectives on Forgiveness.Gregory L. Bock (ed.) - 2019 - Vernon Press.
    The Philosophy of Forgiveness, Volume IV: Christian Perspectives on Forgiveness is a collection of essays that explores different Christian views on forgiveness. Each essay takes up a different topic, such as the nature of divine forgiveness, the basis for forgiving our enemies, and the limits of forgiveness. In some chapters, the views of different philosophers and theologians are explored, figures such as St. John Climacus, Bonaventure, and Nietzsche. In other chapters, the concept of forgiveness is analyzed in light of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Thomas Aquinas between just war and pacifism.Gregory M. Reichberg - 2010 - Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (2):219-241.
    Some recent authors have argued that Aquinas deliberately integrated a pacifist outlook into his just war theory. Others, by contrast, have maintained that his rejection of pacifism was unequivocal. The present article attempts to set the historical record straight by an examination of Aquinas's writings on this topic. In addition to Q. 40, A. 1 of Summa theologiae II–II, the text usually cited in this connection, this article considers the biblical commentaries where Aquinas explains how the Gospel “precepts of patience,” (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  20. Legislating Morality: Scoring the Hart‐Devlin Debate after Fifty Years.Gregory Bassham - 2012 - Ratio Juris 25 (2):117-132.
    It has now been more than 50 years since H. L. A Hart and Lord Patrick Devlin first squared off in perhaps the most celebrated jurisprudential debate of the twentieth‐century (1959–1967). The central issue in that dispute—whether the state may criminalize immoral behavior as such—continues to be debated today, but in a vastly changed legal landscape. In this article I take a fresh look at the Hart‐Devlin debate in the light of five decades of social and legal changes.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21.  5
    Contemporary Practices of Citizenship in Asia and the West: Care of the Self.Gregory Bracken (ed.) - 2020 - Amsterdam University Press.
    This collection of essays examines urban communities and societies in Asia and the West to shed much-needed light on issues that have emerged as the world experiences its new urban turn. An urbanized world should be an improving place, one that is better to live in, one where humans can flourish. This book examines contemporary practices of care of the self in cities in Asia and the West, including challenges to citizenship and even the right to the city itself. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  23
    The Explanatory Tools of Theoretical Population Biology.Gregory Cooper - 1990 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:165 - 178.
    What is the role (or roles) of mathematical theory in ecology and evolutionary biology? How does the construction of such theory advance our understanding? The lack of clear answers to this pair of questions has been a source of controversy both within the sciences themselves, and in the philosophical discussions of these sciences as well. In an attempt to shed some light on these issues, I look at what some biologists have had to say on the matter and at (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  23. Characters and contingency.Gregory Currie - manuscript
    One way creatures of fiction seem to differ from real things is in their essential properties. While you and I might not have done many of the things we did do, Anna Karenina could not, surely, have been other than a lover of Vronsky. Is that right? Not straightforwardly: while it is true that “Necessarily, someone who was not a lover of Vronsky would not be Anna”, it is also true that “Someone who was necessarily a lover of Vronsky would (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24.  42
    Stipulations Missing Axioms in Frege's Grundgesetze der Arithmetik.Gregory Landini - 2022 - History and Philosophy of Logic 43 (4):347-382.
    Frege's Grundgesetze der Arithmetik offers a conception of cpLogic as the study of functions. Among functions are included those that are concepts, i.e. characteristic functions whose values are the logical objects that are the True/the False. What, in Frege's view, are the objects the True/the False? Frege's stroke functions are themselves concepts. His stipulation introducing his negation stroke mentions that it yields [...]. But curiously no accommodating axiom is given, and there is no such theorem. Why is it that some (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  28
    Aquinas on The Distinction Between Esse and Esse: How the Name ‘Esse’ Can Signify Essence.Gregory T. Doolan - 2023 - New Blackfriars 104 (1114):628-650.
    In a number of texts throughout his career, Thomas Aquinas identifies different senses of the term ‘esse’. Most notably, he notes that according to one sense, the term signifies the act of existence (actus essendi), which he famously holds is really distinct from essence in all beings other than God. Perhaps surprisingly, he also notes on a number of occasions that according to another sense, the term ‘esse’ can signify that very principle that he says is distinct from the act (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. In starvation's shadow: The role of logistics in the strained byzantine-european relations during the first crusade.Gregory D. Bell - 2010 - Byzantion 80:38-71.
    At the time of the First Crusade, numerous factors fed the tension between the Byzantines and those Western Europeans who traveled through imperial lands. However, one of these factors - the supply of food - is often assumed or taken for granted. The purpose of this article is to examine the impact that the acquisition of food had on relations between the purported allies. It seems that during the First Crusade, at a critical juncture in their ongoing social and political (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Carnap, semantics and ontology.Gregory Lavers - 2004 - Erkenntnis 60 (3):295-316.
    This paper will deal with three questions regarding Carnap's transition from the position he held at the time of writing Syntax to the doctrines he held during his semantic phase: (1) What was Carnap's attitude towards truth at the time of writing Syntax? (2) What was Carnap's position regarding questions of reference and ontology at the time of writing Syntax? (3) Was Carnap's acceptance of Tarski's analysis of truth and reference detrimental to his philosophical project? Section 1 of this paper (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  28. Paradigmatic Explanations: Strauss's Dangerous Idea.Gregory W. Dawes - 2007 - Louvain Studies 32 (1-2):67-80.
    David Friedrich Strauss is best known for his mythical interpretation of the Gospel narratives. He opposed both the supernaturalists (who regarded the Gospel stories as reliable) and the rationalists (who offered natural explanations of purportedly supernatural events). His mythical interpretation suggests that many of the stories about Jesus were woven out of pre-existing messianic beliefs and expectations. Picking up this suggestion, I argue that the Gospel writers thought paradigmatically rather than historically. A paradigmatic explanation assimilates the event-to-be- explained to what (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  1
    Conceptualization and Justification.Gregory Salmieri - 2013 - In Allan Gotthelf & James G. Lennox (eds.), Concepts and Their Role in Knowledge: Reflections on Objectivist Epistemology. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press. pp. 41-84.
    Given its title, one might expect Ayn Rand's Introduction to Objectivist Epistemology (ITOE) to outline her positions on the issues normally covered in introductory courses and texts on epistemology. In particular, one might expect to find discussions of epistemic justification- i.e., "our right to the beliefs we have" (Dancy 2005, 263). Justification and the nature of knowledge are widely regarded as the essential subject matter of the field, and, as we will see, Rand effectively agrees with this consensus. 1 Yet (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  30.  57
    The Evolution of Consciousness and the Theology of Nature.Gregory R. Peterson - 1999 - Zygon 34 (2):283-306.
    Theology and philosophy have traditionally assumed a radical split between human beings and the rest of creation. Philosophically, the split is usually justified in terms of a locus humanus, some one cognitive trait that human beings possess and nonhuman animals do not. Theologically, this trait is usually identified as that which makes us in the image of God. Research in animal cognition, however, suggests that we are not unique in as many respects as we think we are. This suggests that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  31.  7
    Leibniz on Compossibility and Possible Worlds.Brown Gregory & Yual Chiek (eds.) - 2016 - Cham: Springer.
    This volume brings together a number of original articles by leading Leibniz scholars to address the meaning and significance of Leibniz’s notions of compossibility and possible worlds. In order to avoid the conclusion that everything that exists is necessary, or that all possibles are actual, as Spinoza held, Leibniz argued that not all possible substances are compossible, that is, capable of coexisting. In Leibniz’s view, the compossibility relation divides all possible substances into disjoint sets, each of which constitutes a possible (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Plato's "third man" argument (PARM. 132a1-b2): Text and logic.Gregory Vlastos - 1969 - Philosophical Quarterly 19 (77):289-301.
    This paper is a restatement of my earlier analysis of this argument (1954), Revised in the light of critical comments by other scholars and of closer study of the text. It includes a critical discussion of an alternative formalization of the argument, First offered by wilfrid sellars (1955) and retained (with modifications) by colin strang (1963), Which eliminates successfully the inconsistency of the premises of the argument but has dubious support from plato's text.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  33.  39
    Knowing God through and in All Things: A Proposal for Reading Bonaventure's Itinerarium mentis in Deum.Gregory F. LaNave - 2009 - Franciscan Studies 67:267-299.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Scholars of Bonaventure's thought labor under the difficulty that the Seraphic Doctor is more widely admired than read. Yet there is one advantage they may claim: the immense popularity down through the centuries of his magnum opus: the Itinerarium mentis in Deum, "The Journey of the Mind to God." The text is poetic, concise, and dense. It summarizes many points in Bonaventure's philosophy, theology, and spirituality – indeed, it (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Theories of Consciousness & Death.Gregory Nixon (ed.) - 2016 - New York, USA: QuantumDream.
    What happens to the inner light of consciousness with the death of the individual body and brain? Reductive materialism assumes it simply fades to black. Others think of consciousness as indicating a continuation of self, a transformation, an awakening or even alternatives based on the quality of life experience. In this issue, speculation drawn from theoretic research are presented. -/- Table of Contents Epigraph: From “The Immortal”, Jorge Luis Borges iii Editor’s Introduction: I Killed a Squirrel the Other Day, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  45
    Hermann Cohen's Das Prinzip der Infinitesimalmethode, Ernst Cassirer, and the Politics of Science in Wilhelmine Germany.Gregory B. Moynahan - 2003 - Perspectives on Science 11 (1):35-75.
    Few texts summarize and at the same time compound the challenges of their author's philosophy so sharply as Hermann Cohen's Das Prinzip der Infinitesimalmethode und seine Geschichte . The book's meaning and style are greatly illuminated by placing it in the scientific, political, and academic context of late-nineteenth century Germany. As this context changed, so did both the reception of the philosophy of the infinitesimal and of the Marburg school more generally. A study of this transformation casts significant light (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  36.  60
    On McCauley's why religion is natural and science is not: Some further observations.Gregory R. Peterson - 2014 - Zygon 49 (3):716-727.
    Robert McCauley's Why Religion Is Natural and Science Is Not provides a summary interpretive statement of the standard model in cognitive science of religion, what I have previously called the HADD + ToM + Cultural Epidemiology model, along with a more general argument comparing religious cognition to scientific thinking and a novel framework for understanding both in terms of the concept of the maturationally natural. I here follow up on some observations made in a previous paper, developing them in (...) of McCauley's own response to my previous arguments. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  37.  57
    Characters and contingency.Gregory Courrle - 2003 - Dialectica 57 (2):137–148.
    One way creatures of fiction seem to differ from real things is in their essential properties. While you and I might not have done many of the things we did do, Anna Karenina could not, surely, have been other than a lover of Vronsky. Is that right? Not straightforwardly: while it is true that “Necessarily, someone who was not a lover of Vronsky would not be Anna” it is also true that “Someone who was necessarily a lover of Vronsky would (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38.  27
    Hermann Cohen's.Gregory B. Moynahan - 2003 - Perspectives on Science 11 (1):35-75.
    : Few texts summarize and at the same time compound the challenges of their author's philosophy so sharply as Hermann Cohen's Das Prinzip der Infinitesimalmethode und seine Geschichte (1883). The book's meaning and style are greatly illuminated by placing it in the scientific, political, and academic context of late-nineteenth century Germany. As this context changed, so did both the reception of the philosophy of the infinitesimal and of the Marburg school more generally. A study of this transformation casts significant (...) on the political relevance of the philosophy of science in theWilhelmine era. As a means of following this development across time, Cohen's text is read through its changing reception in the philosophy of his closest disciple, Ernst Cassirer. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  39.  16
    Text without Context: Some Errors of Stanley Fish.Gregory Currie - 1991 - Philosophy and Literature 15 (2):212-228.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Gregory Currie TEXT WITHOUT CONTEXT: SOME ERRORS OF STANLEY FISH "Intuition told him that the vast ineptitude of the venture would serve as proof that no fraud was afoot." —Jorge Luis Borges, "Tom Castro, the Implausible Imposter," in A Universal History ofInfamy There are those of us who seek unity, universality, patterns of invariance in any diverse multitude of particulars. With the interpretation of texts, the diversity is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40.  29
    Russell to Frege, 24 May 1903: "I Believe That I Have Discovered That Classes Are Completely Superfluous".Gregory Landini - 1992 - Russell: The Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies 12 (2):160-185.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:RUSSELL TO FREGE, 24 MAY 1903: "I BELIEVE I HAVE DISCOVERED THAT CLASSES ARE ENTIRELY SUPERFLUOUS" GREGORY LANDINI Philosophy / University of Iowa Iowa City, IA 52242, USA It was his consideration of Cantor's proof that there is no greatest cardinal, Russell recalls in My Philosophical Development, that led in the spring of 1901 to the discovery of the paradox of the class of all classes not members (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  41.  23
    Spontaneous order and civilization: Burke and Hayek on markets, contracts and social order.Gregory M. Collins - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (3):386-415.
    In light of a growing body of scholarship that has cast doubt on the analytic import of spontaneous order, the purpose of my article is to rethink the intellectual relationship between Edmund Burke and Friedrich Hayek by suggesting that reading spontaneous order into Burke’s thought introduces greater tensions between the two thinkers than prior scholars have suggested. One crucial tension, I suggest, is that Hayek believed that contractual arrangements, competitive markets and the rule of law could sustain the growth (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  4
    Inspiration/Expiration (Completion).Grégory Chatonsky - 2023 - Substance 52 (1):153-154.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Inspiration/Expiration (Completion)Grégory Chatonsky (bio)This text was co-written with an artificial intelligence (AI). This so-called author wrote a sentence, then the software continued, and so on, each influencing the other, completing each other. Another AI summarized this text in a few keywords that allowed it to automatically generate an image from a stock of 14 million documents. Click for larger view View full resolutionThe organism was still breathing, in the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  20
    Spontaneous order and civilization: Burke and Hayek on markets, contracts and social order.Gregory M. Collins - 2021 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (3):386-415.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Volume 48, Issue 3, Page 386-415, March 2022. In light of a growing body of scholarship that has cast doubt on the analytic import of spontaneous order, the purpose of my article is to rethink the intellectual relationship between Edmund Burke and Friedrich Hayek by suggesting that reading spontaneous order into Burke’s thought introduces greater tensions between the two thinkers than prior scholars have suggested. One crucial tension, I suggest, is that Hayek believed that contractual (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  10
    Characters and Contingency.Gregory Courrle - 2003 - Dialectica 57 (2):137-148.
    One way creatures of fiction seem to differ from real things is in their essential properties. While you and I might not have done many of the things we did do, Anna Karenina could not, surely, have been other than a lover of Vronsky. Is that right? Not straightforwardly: while it is true that “Necessarily, someone who was not a lover of Vronsky would not be Anna” it is also true that “Someone who was necessarily a lover of Vronsky would (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. On the Curious Calculi of Wittgenstein and Spencer Brown.Gregory Landini - 2018 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 6 (10).
    In his Tractatus, Wittgenstein sets out what he calls his N-operator notation which can be used to calculate whether an expression is a tautology. In his Laws of Form, George Spencer Brown offers what he calls a “primary algebra” for such calculation. Both systems are perplexing. But comparing two blurry images can reduce noise, producing a focus. This paper reveals that Spencer Brown independently rediscovered the quantifier-free part of the N-operator calculus. The comparison sheds a flood light on each (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. The Art of Truth.Gregory Schufreider - 2010 - Research in Phenomenology 40 (3):331-362.
    In The Truth in Painting , Derrida insists that Heidegger's treatment of “a famous picture by Van Gogh” marks “a moment of pathetic collapse.” While we would agree, we would insist that this example does not render Heidegger's entire philosophy of art suspect. Instead, if his reading of Van Gogh's painting is “derisory and symptomatic,” it is nonetheless “significant,” if only insofar as it provides an indication of Heidegger's underestimation of the plastic arts in favor of the elevation of poetry—an (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47.  22
    What Is Going On? Where Do We Go from Here? Should the Souls of White Folks Be Saved?Gregory Fernando Pappas - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (1):67-80.
    in "whites: made in america," the Rev. Thandeka takes on the issues that have recently been in the minds of many Americans in light of racial problems and the shocking results of the elections: "What is going on?" She does not pretend to provide a full diagnosis, but argues that there is a need for a new conceptual shift and new target of our inquiries. Thandeka argues that underneath the veil of whiteness, there are troublesome feelings and emotions that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  27
    Theism and the justification of first principles in Thomas Reid’s epistemology.Gregory S. Poore - unknown
    The role of theism in Thomas Reid’s epistemology remains an unresolved question. Opinions range from outright denials that theism has any relevance to Reid’s epistemology to claims that Reid’s epistemology depends upon theism in a dogmatic or a viciously circular manner. This dissertation attempts to bring some order to this interpretive fray by answering the following question: What role or roles does theism play in Reid’s epistemology, particularly in relation to the epistemic justification of first principles? Chapters 2-4 lay the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49. Misreading the Unparticipated Source of Difference in Deleuze's Reversal of Platonism.Gregory Kirk - 2013 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (1):205-225.
    In this article, I argue that in his “reversal of Platonism” in The Logic of Sense, Gilles Deleuze does not adequately consider in what sense Plotinus identifies The One as “unparticipated.” I further claim that when The One is understood in the sense I consider Plotinus to have presented it, it shows itself to have attributes similar to Deleuze’s “dark precursor,” insofar as both The One and the dark precursor are ineffable, are inexhaustible, and contain absolute generative power. I propose (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  30
    Simply the Best?Gregory R. P. Stacey - 2021 - Faith and Philosophy 38 (4):431-459.
    Some critics claim that ontological arguments are dialectically ineffective against sceptics, whatever the sceptics’ broader metaphysical commitments. In this paper, I examine and contest arguments for this conclusion. I suggest that such critics overlook important claims about God’s nature (viz. divine simplicity and divine inimitability) typically advanced by proponents of ontological arguments who endorse classical theism. I reformulate two representative ontological arguments in light of this characterization of God, arguing that for philosophers prepared to endorse Meinongianism or modal Platonism, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000