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  1. Two Major Recent Approaches to Kant's Second Analogy.Gregg Osborne - 2006 - Kant Studien 97 (4):409-429.
    The second analogy of experience is one of the most famous and crucial parts of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. Despite 220 years of intense scrutiny and debate, however, no consensus has emerged as to the precise nature of its argument. A main source of disagreement in recent years has been the following question: With what is Kant concerned in this section? Is he concerned with necessary conditions of our believing in the first place that there has been a case (...)
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  2.  75
    Does Kant Refute Hume’s Derivation of the Concept of Cause?Gregg Osborne - 2007 - Journal of Philosophical Research 32:293-318.
    Kant has long been held in some quarters to undermine Hume’s derivation of the concept of cause. At least part of what Kant aims to show in his second analogy, according to adherents of this view, is that our putative awareness of objective succession—and thus of individual events—depends on our already having it. The aim of this paper is fourfold. First, to make clear that there are strong textual grounds for the claim that Kant aims to show this. Second, to (...)
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  3.  6
    Henry Allison on Kant’s First Analogy.Gregg Osborne - 2022 - Kantian Review 27 (1):5-22.
    Henry Allison’s interpretation of Kant’s First Analogy is among the most intriguing in the literature. Its virtues are considerable, but no previous discussion has done full justice to them. Nor has any previous discussion systematically explored the most important challenges to which it seems subject. This paper does both. Early sections provide a more thorough exegesis than is otherwise available and provide stronger textual backing than does Allison himself. Later sections turn to problems, most of which have not been raised (...)
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  4.  56
    James Van Cleve on the Kant-Frege View and Kant’s First Analogy.Gregg Osborne - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 16:197-204.
    According to James Van Cleve, the principle with which Kant is concerned in the first analogy follows from the view that existence statements are properly made only with quantifiers and have to be expressible in the form ‘∃ xFx’. This thesis is extremely surprising and of great potential importance. It rests on the conviction that two more basic principles can be derived from the relevant view about existence statements. The first of these more basic principles is that there can be (...)
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  5. Bennett’s Porcelain Pig and the Empirical Unity of Time.Gregg Osborne - 2018 - In Violetta L. Waibel, Margit Ruffing & David Wagner (eds.), Natur Und Freiheit. Akten des Xii. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses. De Gruyter. pp. 1117-1124.
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  6. Judgmental Activity and Putative Awareness in Kant's Second Analogy of Experience.Gregg Osborne - 2001 - Dissertation, The University of Chicago
    This dissertation centers on a prominent but generally neglected line of argument in Kant's second analogy of experience. It differs from most other recent treatments of this section of the Critique of Pure Reason in taking Kant to be concerned there with conditions of representation or putative awareness rather than mere conditions of verification or confirmation. This difference in conception has profound implications for the interpretation not only of the section itself but also of the transcendental deduction of the categories (...)
     
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  7.  35
    Hume’s Argument in Treatise 1.3.3.3: An Exposition and Defense.Gregg Osborne - 2005 - Hume Studies 31 (2):225-247.
    Hume claims to prove in Treatise 1.3.3.3 that the causal maxim is neither intuitively nor demonstratively certain. The aim of this paper is to elucidate some puzzling features of his argument and thereby show that objections raised by James Beattie, Barry Stroud, and Harold Noonan can be answered. The conclusion is that Hume’s argument goes through given convictions Hume expects his readers to share long before they reach this point of the Treatise. These convictions are that all ideas are imagistic (...)
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    ¿ Dónde está la deducción objetiva de Kant?Gregg Osborne - 2007 - Areté. Revista de Filosofía 19 (1):87-118.
    “Where Is Kant’s Objective Deduction?”. The preface to the first edition of Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason is marked by a distinction between objective and subjective sides of the transcendental deduction. The objective side alone is said to be essential to Kant’s main purpose and is also said to retain its full strength even if the subjective side is not found to be convincing. The thesis of this paper is twofold. First, that the most prominent accounts of this distinction in (...)
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    A Crucial Passage in Kant’s First Analogy.Gregg Osborne - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy 14:131-135.
    This paper is concerned with a passage that has long intrigued interpreters of Kant’s First Analogy. the passage in question can be found at A188/B231 of the Critique of Pure Reason. In order to perceive that some item x comes to exist or ceases to exist, asserts Kant in this passage, you must connect the coming to exist or ceasing to exist of x to things that already exist before it takes place and continue to exist until it is completed. (...)
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    Hume’s Argument in Treatise 1.3.3.3: An Exposition and Defense.Gregg Osborne - 2005 - Hume Studies 31 (2):225-247.
    Hume claims to prove in Treatise 1.3.3.3 that the causal maxim is neither intuitively nor demonstratively certain. The aim of this paper is to elucidate some puzzling features of his argument and thereby show that objections raised by James Beattie, Barry Stroud, and Harold Noonan can be answered. The conclusion is that Hume’s argument goes through given convictions Hume expects his readers to share long before they reach this point of the Treatise. These convictions are that all ideas are imagistic (...)
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    Does Kant Refute Hume’s Derivation of the Concept of Cause?Gregg Osborne - 2007 - Journal of Philosophical Research 32:293-318.
    Kant has long been held in some quarters to undermine Hume’s derivation of the concept of cause. At least part of what Kant aims to show in his second analogy, according to adherents of this view, is that our putative awareness of objective succession—and thus of individual events—depends on our already having it. The aim of this paper is fourfold. First, to make clear that there are strong textual grounds for the claim that Kant aims to show this. Second, to (...)
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  12.  8
    Dryer and Allison on Kant’s Move to Absolute Permanence in the First Analogy.Gregg Osborne - 2013 - In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht: Akten des Xi. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter. pp. 697-706.
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