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  1. Computer Simulation and the Features of Novel Empirical Data.Greg Lusk - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 56:145-152.
    In an attempt to determine the epistemic status of computer simulation results, philosophers of science have recently explored the similarities and differences between computer simulations and experiments. One question that arises is whether and, if so, when, simulation results constitute novel empirical data. It is often supposed that computer simulation results could never be empirical or novel because simulations never interact with their targets, and cannot go beyond their programming. This paper argues against this position by examining whether, and under (...)
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  2. Incorporating User Values Into Climate Services.Wendy Parker & Greg Lusk - 2019 - Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 100 (9):1643-1650.
    Increasingly there are calls for climate services to be “co-produced” with users, taking into account not only the basic information needs of users but also their value systems and decision contexts. What does this mean in practice? One way that user values can be incorporated into climate services is in the management of inductive risk. This involves understanding which errors in climate service products would have particularly negative consequences from the users’ perspective (e.g., underestimating rather than overestimating the change in (...)
     
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  3.  11
    Political Legitimacy in the Democratic View: The Case of Climate Services.Greg Lusk - 2020 - Philosophy of Science 87 (5):991-1002.
    Wendy S. Parker and I have advanced an inductive-risk approach to the provision of climate information that relies on the contextual values of information users. This approach aims to improve the e...
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    Saving the Data.Greg Lusk - 2021 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 72 (1):277-298.
    Three decades ago, James Bogen and James Woodward argued against the possibility and usefulness of scientific explanations of data. They developed a picture of scientific reasoning where stable phenomena were identified via data without much input from theory. Rather than explain data, theories ‘save the phenomena’. In contrast, I argue that there are good reasons to explain data, and the practice of science reveals attempts to do so. I demonstrate that algorithms employed to address inverse problems in remote-sensing applications should (...)
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    Varieties of Data-Centric Science: Regional Climate Modeling and Model Organism Research.Elisabeth Lloyd, Greg Lusk, Stuart Gluck & Seth McGinnis - 2022 - Philosophy of Science 89 (4):802-823.
    Modern science’s ability to produce, store, and analyze big datasets is changing the way that scientific research is practiced. Philosophers have only begun to comprehend the changed nature of scientific reasoning in this age of “big data.” We analyze data-focused practices in biology and climate modeling, identifying distinct species of data-centric science: phenomena-laden in biology and phenomena-agnostic in climate modeling, each better suited for its own domain of application, though each entail trade-offs. We argue that data-centric practices in science are (...)
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    Non-epistemic values and scientific assessment: an adequacy-for-purpose view.Greg Lusk & Kevin C. Elliott - 2022 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 12 (2):1-22.
    The literature on values in science struggles with questions about how to describe and manage the role of values in scientific research. We argue that progress can be made by shifting this literature’s current emphasis. Rather than arguing about how non-epistemic values can or should figure into scientific assessment, we suggest analyzing how scientific assessment can accommodate non-epistemic values. For scientific assessment to do so, it arguably needs to incorporate goals that have been traditionally characterized as non-epistemic. Building on this (...)
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  7.  36
    A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming. [REVIEW]Greg Lusk - 2014 - Annals of Science 71 (2):295-298.
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    Looking Forward and Backward at Extreme Event Attribution in Climate Policy.Greg Lusk - 2022 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 25 (1):37-51.
    How the science of probabilistic extreme event attribution might inform climate change adaptation is hotly debated. Central to these debates is an understanding that event attribution’s backward-lo...
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    Is HPS a valuable component of a STEM education? An empirical study of student interest in HPS courses within an undergraduate science curriculum.Greg Lusk - 2022 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 12 (1):1-14.
    This paper presents the results of a survey of students majoring in STEM fields whose education contained a significant history, philosophy and sociology of science component. The survey was administered to students in a North American public 4-year university just prior to completing their HPS sequence. The survey assessed students’ attitudes towards HPS to gauge how those attitudes changed over the course of their college careers, and to identify the benefits and obstacles to studying HPS as a component of their (...)
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    Eric Winsberg's Philosophy and Climate Science. [REVIEW]Greg Lusk - 2019 - BJPS Review of Books.
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