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  1.  22
    Emotion, Somatovisceral Afference, and Autonomic Regulation.Greg J. Norman, Gary G. Berntson & John T. Cacioppo - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (2):113-123.
    The precise relationship between the autonomic nervous system and emotion has been a topic of intense debate and research throughout the history of modern psychology. The present article considers some of the more influential theoretical frameworks that continue to drive contemporary research on the relationship between emotion and physiological processes. In particular, we highlight the multiple routes through which somatovisceral afference influences emotion and how this relates to the topic of emotion-specific patterns of autonomic nervous system activity.
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  2.  13
    Positive Effects of Nature on Cognitive Performance Across Multiple Experiments: Test Order but Not Affect Modulates the Cognitive Effects.Cecilia U. D. Stenfors, Stephen C. Van Hedger, Kathryn E. Schertz, Francisco A. C. Meyer, Karen E. L. Smith, Greg J. Norman, Stefan C. Bourrier, James T. Enns, Omid Kardan, John Jonides & Marc G. Berman - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
  3.  44
    Current Emotion Research in Psychophysiology: The Neurobiology of Evaluative Bivalence.Greg J. Norman, Catherine J. Norris, Jackie Gollan, Tiffany A. Ito, Louise C. Hawkley, Jeff T. Larsen, John T. Cacioppo & Gary G. Berntson - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (3):349-359.
    Evaluative processes have their roots in early evolutionary history, as survival is dependent on an organism’s ability to identify and respond appropriately to positive, rewarding or otherwise salubrious stimuli as well as to negative, noxious, or injurious stimuli. Consequently, evaluative processes are ubiquitous in the animal kingdom and are represented at multiple levels of the nervous system, including the lowest levels of the neuraxis. While evolution has sculpted higher level evaluative systems into complex and sophisticated information-processing networks, they do not (...)
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  4.  43
    Comment: Laterality and Evaluative Bivalence: A Neuroevolutionary Perspective.Gary G. Berntson, Greg J. Norman & John T. Cacioppo - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (3):344-346.
    Rutherford and Lindell (2011) review an extensive literature on lateralization of emotion. As they note, an important issue surrounding this question is the nature of emotion, which bears on what, precisely, is lateralized. The present comments are intended to broaden the context of the review, by considering lateralization from the standpoint of a bivariate model of evaluative processes and a neuroevolutionary perspective.
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  5.  4
    Corrigendum: Positive Effects of Nature on Cognitive Performance Across Multiple Experiments: Test Order but Not Affect Modulates the Cognitive Effects.Cecilia U. D. Stenfors, Stephen C. Van Hedger, Kathryn E. Schertz, Francisco A. C. Meyer, Karen E. L. Smith, Greg J. Norman, Stefan C. Bourrier, James T. Enns, Omid Kardan, John Jonides & Marc G. Berman - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  6.  28
    Comment: Emotional and Autonomic Arousal Constructs in Psychophysiological Research: Where Do We Go From Here?Greg J. Norman - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (1):79-80.
    Picard, Fedor, and Ayzenberg provide a review of the existing literature on the relationship between electrodermal activity and affective processes and present data from a number of studies suggesting strong lateralization in EDA reactivity to emotion. As the authors note, their manuscript extends previous work suggesting the concept of arousal is more complex than previously thought, and they provide a framework for interpreting such complexities within the context of a multiple arousal theory.
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