95 found
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  1. On being responsible.Graham Haydon - 1978 - Philosophical Quarterly 28 (110):46-57.
  2.  28
    Education, philosophy and the ethical environment.Graham Haydon - 2006 - New York: Routledge.
    This book offers a critical and thought-provoking analysis of some of the fundamental questions about the nature and purpose of education. It includes ideas such as the demands of pluralism and the liberal fear of indoctrination.
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  3.  9
    Education, Persons and Society: A Philosophical Enquiry.Graham Haydon & Glenn Langoford - 1986 - British Journal of Educational Studies 34 (2):202.
  4.  14
    Values education: sustaining the ethical environment.Graham Haydon - 2004 - Journal of Moral Education 33 (2):115-129.
    This article, drawing on philosophical sources, proposes a certain way of seeing the nature and scope of values education: as a matter of ‘sustaining the ethical environment’. The idea is introduced that just as we live in a physical environment we also live in an ethical environment, ‘the surrounding climate of ideas about how to live’. It is argued that there are some illuminating analogies between our responsibility for the quality of the physical environment and our responsibility for the quality (...)
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  5.  46
    The 'right to education' and compulsory schooling.Graham Haydon - 1977 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 9 (1):1–15.
  6. Reason and Virtues: The Paradox of R. S. Peters on Moral Education.Graham Haydon - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (supplement s1):173-188.
    This article examines the work of R. S. Peters on moral development and moral education, as represented in his papers collected under that name, pointing out that these writings have been relatively neglected. It approaches these writings through the lens of the ‘familiar story’ that philosophical work on this topic switched during, roughly, the 1980s from an emphasis on rational principles to an emphasis on virtues and care. Starting from what Peters called ‘the paradox of moral education’—roughly, that a rational (...)
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  7.  12
    Education for a Pluralist Society: Philosophical Perspectives on the Swann Report.Graham Haydon - 1988 - British Journal of Educational Studies 36 (3):269-270.
  8. Teaching about Values: A New Approach.Graham Haydon - 1998 - British Journal of Educational Studies 46 (4):466-468.
     
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  9.  58
    7. is there virtue in anger?Graham Haydon - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (1):59–66.
    If there is to be a convergence in public understanding on a minimal conception of morality, morality(n), there has to be a way of talking about the content of that morality which can be both readily understood and widely adopted.
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  10.  20
    Moral Education.Graham Haydon - 1993 - Philosophy Now 8:9-11.
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  11.  25
    4. morality in the narrow sense.Graham Haydon - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (1):31–40.
    I have suggested that popular demands for moral education, and beliefs that it can be effective, for instance in reducing violence, presuppose some appropriate and shared conception of morality and moral education. But the existence, and even the possibility, of such a shared conception is often now called into question. The focus is very often on diversity within a plural society. And I have myself argued before that not only do we have differences of opinion over whether certain sorts of (...)
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  12.  18
    4. Morality in the Narrow Sense.Graham Haydon - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (1):31-40.
    I have suggested that in looking for shared values which were seen as having force for people's conduct, the SCAA Forum was in effect looking for a shared morality. This does not yet show that a shared understanding was achieved on what kind of thing morality is Ð no such agreement was explicitly aimed at — but it does point in the direction in which such an agreement might be found. The key is to be found, I think, in the (...)
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  13.  30
    Autonomy as an aim of education and the autonomy of teachers[1].Graham Haydon - 1983 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 17 (2):219–228.
    Graham Haydon; Autonomy as an Aim of Education and the Autonomy of Teachers, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 17, Issue 2, 30 May 2006, Pages 219–228.
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  14.  3
    Autonomy as an Aim of Education and the Autonomy of Teachers.Graham Haydon - 1983 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 17 (2):219-228.
    Graham Haydon; Autonomy as an Aim of Education and the Autonomy of Teachers, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 17, Issue 2, 30 May 2006, Pages 219–228.
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  15.  24
    Conceptions of the secular in society, polity and schools.Graham Haydon - 1994 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 28 (1):65–75.
    Current debates about whether schools which are not secular should be supported by the State within a society which is secular demand clarity about the distinction between the secular and the non-secular. It is argued that the notions of a secular society and of a secular polity help to illuminate the nature of a secular school. More substantively, it is suggested that we have reason to support a form of polity which allows both secular and non-secular contributions into the public, (...)
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  16.  11
    Conceptions of the Secular in Society, Polity and Schools.Graham Haydon - 1994 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 28 (1):65-75.
    Current debates about whether schools which are not secular should be supported by the State within a society which is secular demand clarity about the distinction between the secular and the non-secular. It is argued that the notions of a secular society and of a secular polity help to illuminate the nature of a secular school. More substantively, it is suggested that we have reason to support a form of polity which allows both secular and non-secular contributions into the public, (...)
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  17.  10
    7. Is there Virtue in Anger?Graham Haydon - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (1):59-66.
    Though talking a language of virtues — and doing so with consistency and clarity — may well be more challenging for teachers — as for all of us — than talking a language of norms, there is one area, relevant to violence, where it is unlikely to be avoidable in schools. People get angry, and sometimes anger leads to violence. Though there is also much violence that does not stem from anger, as I have acknowledged in the previous chapter, anger (...)
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  18.  4
    10. The Public Role of Moral Norms.Graham Haydon - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (1):89-100.
    The role of rules in moral education has often been recognised by moral philosophers, but sometimes with the implication that this role is rather unimportant from the moral philosopher's point of view. Thus Geoffrey Warnock (1971, p. 51): It is often said, reasonably enough, that the moral education of children at any rate may include, at a certain stage, the promulgation to them by parents and teachers of rules for their conduct on certain moral matters.… However, if it is to (...)
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  19.  3
    Moral Education.Graham Haydon - 2003 - In Randall Curren (ed.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Education. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 320–331.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Distinguishing Moral Education by Its Aims Rationalistic Accounts and Their Critics Virtue Accounts and Their Limitations Schools and Dialogue Conclusion.
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  20.  6
    13. Consensus, Criticism and Change.Graham Haydon - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (1):123-132.
    I have sketched an understanding of morality(n) as having a provisional authority in being subject both to consensus and to criticism and change in a broadly democratic way. But I have also admitted that we lack the formal processes of criticism and change which exist for the law. The reader could reasonably demand that I say at least something more than I have said so far about ways in which the processes of consensus, criticism and change I have in mind (...)
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  21.  12
    The ‘Right to Education’ and Compulsory Schooling.Graham Haydon - 1977 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 9 (1):1-15.
  22. The Common School and the Comprehensive Ideal.Mark Halstead & Graham Haydon (eds.) - 2008-10-10 - Wiley‐Blackwell.
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  23.  20
    Bibliography.Graham Haydon - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (1):153–156.
    Whatever may be the case for philosophy in general, philosophy of education has had rather little to say about violence. The Journal of Philosophy of Education, for instance, from its conception in the 1960s under the title of Proceedings of the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain, has contained very little discussion of violence. There have been occasional papers in which violence is referred to, from discussions of the justification of punishment in schools, which include corporal punishment within their (...)
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  24.  3
    13. Consensus, Criticism and Change.Graham Haydon - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (1):123-132.
    I have sketched an understanding of morality(n) as having a provisional authority in being subject both to consensus and to criticism and change in a broadly democratic way. But I have also admitted that we lack the formal processes of criticism and change which exist for the law. The reader could reasonably demand that I say at least something more than I have said so far about ways in which the processes of consensus, criticism and change I have in mind (...)
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  25.  1
    13. consensus, criticism and change.Graham Haydon - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (1):123–132.
    I have sketched an understanding of morality(n) as having a provisional authority in being subject both to consensus and to criticism and change in a broadly democratic way. But I have also admitted that we lack the formal processes of criticism and change which exist for the law. The reader could reasonably demand that I say at least something more than I have said so far about ways in which the processes of consensus, criticism and change I have in mind (...)
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  26.  1
    13. Consensus, Criticism and Change.Graham Haydon - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (1):123-132.
    I have sketched an understanding of morality(n) as having a provisional authority in being subject both to consensus and to criticism and change in a broadly democratic way. But I have also admitted that we lack the formal processes of criticism and change which exist for the law. The reader could reasonably demand that I say at least something more than I have said so far about ways in which the processes of consensus, criticism and change I have in mind (...)
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  27.  1
    13. Consensus, Criticism and Change.Graham Haydon - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (1):123-132.
    I have sketched an understanding of morality(n) as having a provisional authority in being subject both to consensus and to criticism and change in a broadly democratic way. But I have also admitted that we lack the formal processes of criticism and change which exist for the law. The reader could reasonably demand that I say at least something more than I have said so far about ways in which the processes of consensus, criticism and change I have in mind (...)
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  28.  17
    Collective moral philosophy and education for pluralism.Graham Haydon - 1986 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 20 (1):97–106.
    Graham Haydon; Collective Moral Philosophy and Education for Pluralism, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 20, Issue 1, 30 May 2006, Pages 97–106, https.
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  29.  12
    Collective Moral Philosophy and Education for Pluralism.Graham Haydon - 1986 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 20 (1):97-106.
    Graham Haydon; Collective Moral Philosophy and Education for Pluralism, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 20, Issue 1, 30 May 2006, Pages 97–106, https.
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  30.  1
    Diploma in Education: Philosophy of Education I.Graham Haydon - 1992
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  31.  5
    Dogmatic liberalism.Graham Haydon - 1988 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 22 (1):115–121.
    Graham Haydon; Dogmatic Liberalism, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 22, Issue 1, 30 May 2006, Pages 115–121, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9752.1988.
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  32.  3
    Dogmatic Liberalism.Graham Haydon - 1988 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 22 (1):115-121.
    Graham Haydon; Dogmatic Liberalism, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 22, Issue 1, 30 May 2006, Pages 115–121, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9752.1988.
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  33.  1
    Education and the Crisis in Values: Should We be Philosophical about It?Graham Haydon - 1993
  34.  4
    Education and the Crisis in Values.Graham Haydon - 1994 - British Journal of Educational Studies 42 (1):100-101.
  35.  3
    Education and the Global Concern.Graham Haydon & Torsten Husen - 1991 - British Journal of Educational Studies 39 (3):353.
  36.  43
    Editor's note.Graham Haydon - 1995 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 14 (1):7-7.
  37.  16
    Editor's note.Graham Haydon - 1993 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 12 (1):v-vi.
  38.  19
    Educational relevance: A slogan examined.Graham Haydon - 1973 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 7 (2):223–238.
    Graham Haydon; Educational Relevance: A Slogan Examined, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 7, Issue 2, 30 May 2006, Pages 223–238, https://doi.org/10.1.
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  39.  1
    Educational Relevance: A Slogan Examined.Graham Haydon - 1973 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 7 (2):223-238.
    Graham Haydon; Educational Relevance: A Slogan Examined, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 7, Issue 2, 30 May 2006, Pages 223–238, https://doi.org/10.1.
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  40.  4
    First page preview.Graham Haydon - 2007 - Journal of Moral Education 36 (4).
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  41.  22
    3. from values to morality.Graham Haydon - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (1):23–30.
    I have suggested that popular demands for moral education, and beliefs that it can be effective, for instance in reducing violence, presuppose some appropriate and shared conception of morality and moral education. But the existence, and even the possibility, of such a shared conception is often now called into question. The focus is very often on diversity within a plural society. And I have myself argued before that not only do we have differences of opinion over whether certain sorts of (...)
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  42.  1
    3. From Values to Morality.Graham Haydon - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (1):23-30.
    I have suggested that popular demands for moral education, and beliefs that it can be effective, for instance in reducing violence, presuppose some appropriate and shared conception of morality and moral education. But the existence, and even the possibility, of such a shared conception is often now called into question. The focus is very often on diversity within a plural society. And I have myself argued before that not only do we have differences of opinion over whether certain sorts of (...)
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  43.  1
    13. Consensus, Criticism and Change.Graham Haydon - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (1):123-132.
    I have sketched an understanding of morality(n) as having a provisional authority in being subject both to consensus and to criticism and change in a broadly democratic way. But I have also admitted that we lack the formal processes of criticism and change which exist for the law. The reader could reasonably demand that I say at least something more than I have said so far about ways in which the processes of consensus, criticism and change I have in mind (...)
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  44.  21
    How to think about moral education? John Wilson revisited.Graham Haydon - 1992 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 26 (1):127–131.
    Graham Haydon; How to Think about Moral Education? John Wilson revisited, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 26, Issue 1, 30 May 2006, Pages 127–131, ht.
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  45.  6
    How to Think about Moral Education? John Wilson revisited.Graham Haydon - 1992 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 26 (1):127-131.
    Graham Haydon; How to Think about Moral Education? John Wilson revisited, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 26, Issue 1, 30 May 2006, Pages 127–131, ht.
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  46.  10
    Introduction.Graham Haydon - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (1):5–8.
    ‘This book is a response to renewed and widespread public interest in moral education.’.
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  47.  1
    Introduction.Graham Haydon - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (1):5-8.
    ‘This book is a response to renewed and widespread public interest in moral education.’.
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  48.  15
    In search of the comprehensive ideal: By way of and introduction.Graham Haydon - 2007 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (4):523–538.
    This introductory article first gives a brief overview of the articles in the remainder of this special issue. It then considers what we can learn about the comprehensive ideal, and what questions still remain about it, from the treatment it receives in these articles. After an initial discussion of the nature of the common school, two dimensions are identified in which interpretations of the comprehensive ideal often differ: how fully the content of such schooling is filled in, and what its (...)
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  49.  6
    In Search of the Comprehensive Ideal: By Way of and Introduction.Graham Haydon - 2007 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (4):523-538.
    This introductory article first gives a brief overview of the articles in the remainder of this special issue. It then considers what we can learn about the comprehensive ideal, and what questions still remain about it, from the treatment it receives in these articles. After an initial discussion of the nature of the common school, two dimensions are identified in which interpretations of the comprehensive ideal often differ: how fully the content of such schooling is filled in, and what its (...)
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  50.  7
    In Search of the Comprehensive Ideal: By Way of an Introduction.Graham Haydon - 2008-10-10 - In Mark Halstead & Graham Haydon (eds.), The Common School and the Comprehensive Ideal. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 21–37.
    This chapter contains sections titled: What is One Committed to When One Supports the Common School? What is the Common School? Minimal and Maximal Interpretations of the Comprehensive Ideal Values Underlying the Comprehensive Ideal Conclusion Notes References.
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