Results for 'God'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. God’s Power and Almightiness in Whitehead’s Thought.Palmyre Oomen - 2018 - Process Studies 47 (1):83-110.
    Whitehead’s position regarding God’s power is rather unique in the philosophical and theological landscape. Whitehead rejects divine omnipotence (unlike Aquinas), yet he claims (unlike Hans Jonas) that God’s persuasive power is required for everything to exist and occur. This intriguing position is the subject of this article. The article starts with an exploration of Aquinas’s reasoning toward God’s omnipotence. This will be followed by a close examination of Whitehead's own position, starting with an introduction to his philosophy of organism and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2. Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience.William P. Alston - 1991 - Cornell University Press.
    Introduction i. Character of the Book The central thesis of this book is that experiential awareness of God, or as I shall be saying, the perception of God, ...
  3. God and Dispositional Essentialism: An Account of the Laws of Nature.Dani Adams - 2018 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 99 (2):293-316.
    It is common to appeal to governing laws of nature in order to explain the existence of natural regularities. Classical theism, however, maintains the sovereignty thesis: everything distinct from God is created by him and is under his guidance and control. It follows from this that God must somehow be responsible for natural laws and regularities. Therefore, theists need an account of the relation between regularities, laws, and God. I examine competing accounts of laws of nature and conclude that dispositional (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  4. God and Necessity.Brian Leftow - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Modal basics -- Some solutions -- Theist solutions -- The ontology of possibility -- Modal truthmakers -- Modality and the divine nature -- Deity as essential -- Against deity theories -- The role of deity -- The biggest bang -- Divine concepts -- Concepts, syntax, and actualism -- Modality: basic notions -- The genesis of secular modality -- Modal reality -- Essences -- Non-secular modalities -- Theism and modal semantics -- Freedom, preference, and cost -- Explaining modal status -- Explaining (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  5.  1
    Why God must do what is best: a philosophical investigation of theistic optimism.Justin J. Daeley - 2021 - New York, NY, USA: Bloomsbury Academic.
    The idea that God, understood as the most perfect being, must create the best possible world is often underacknowledged by contemporary theologians and philosophers of religion. This book clearly demonstrates the rationale for what Justin Daeley calls Theistic Optimism and interacts with the existing literature in order to highlight its limitations. While locating Theistic Optimism in the thought of Gottfried Leibniz, Daeley argues that Theistic Optimism is consistent with divine freedom, aseity, gratitude, and our typical modal intuitions. By offering plausible (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Does God Have a Nature?Alvin Plantinga - 1962 - Marquette University Press.
    Sets of contingent objects, perhaps, are as contingent as their members; but properties, propositions, numbers and states of affairs, it seems, are objects whose non-existence is quite impossible. If so, however, how are they related to God? Suppose God has a nature: a property he has essentially that includes each property essential to him. Does God have a nature? And if he does, is there a conflict between God's sovereignty and his having a nature? How is God related to such (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   83 citations  
  7.  17
    God's Own Ethics: Norms of Divine Agency and the Argument From Evil.Mark C. Murphy - 2017 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Mark C. Murphy addresses the question of how God's ethics differs from human ethics. Murphy suggests that God is not subject to the moral norms to which we humans are subject. This has immediate implications for the argument from evil: we cannot assume that an absolutely perfect being is in any way bound to prevent the evils of this world.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  8.  7
    Of God Who Comes to Mind.Emmanuel Lévinas - 1998 - Stanford University Press.
    Emmanuel Levinas is one of the most original philosophers in the twentieth century. In this book, continuing his thought on obligation, he investigates the possibility that the word God can be understood now, at the end of the twentieth century, in a meaningful way. The thirteen essays collected in this volume offer an introduction to the wide range of Levinas's thought, addresses philosophical questions concerning politics, language and religion and the philosophies of, amongst others, Heidegger, Kierkegaard, Marx and Derrida. The (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   53 citations  
  9. Playing God: Symbolic Arguments Against Technology.Massimiliano Simons - 2022 - NanoEthics 16 (2):151-165.
    In ethical reflections on new technologies, a specific type of argument often pops up, which criticizes scientists for “playing God” with these new technological possibilities. The first part of this article is an examination of how these arguments have been interpreted in the literature. Subsequently, this article aims to reinterpret these arguments as symbolic arguments: they are grounded not so much in a set of ontological or empirical claims, but concern symbolic classificatory schemes that ground our value judgments in the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10.  43
    Does God Know the Occurrence of a Change Among Particulars? Avicenna and the Problem of God’s Knowledge of Change.Amirhossein Zadyousefi - 2019 - Dialogue 58 (4):621-652.
    (i) God is omniscient; therefore, for any change, C, among particulars, God knows the occurrence of C. (ii) If God knows the occurrence of C, then X. (iii) not-X. It is clear that the set of propositions (i)—(iii) is inconsistent. This is the general form of two problems—which I call the ‘problem of change in knowledge’ (PCK) and the ‘problem of change in essence’ (PCE)—for Avicenna concerning God’s knowledge of particulars. No work in the secondary literature has discussed exactly what (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  11.  49
    God, the Best, and Evil.Bruce Langtry - 2008 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    God, the Best, and Evil is an original treatment of notable problems about God and his actions towards human beings. Three main topics are investigated in detail. First, if God exists, is God in some sense necessarily a value-maximizer? Second, Does a serious difficulty for the existence of God arise from the apparent fact that if God exists then God could have actualized a better possible world than this one? Thirdly are there strong objections top the existence of God based (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  12. God is watching you: how the fear of God makes us human.Dominic Johnson - 2016 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Why me? -- Sticks and stones -- Hammer of God -- God is great -- The problem of atheists -- Guardian angels -- Nations under God -- God knows.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  13. A God that could be real in the new scientific universe.Nancy Ellen Abrams - 2015 - Zygon 50 (2):376-388.
    We are living at the dawn of the first truly scientific picture of the universe-as-a-whole, yet people are still dragging along prescientific ideas about God that cannot be true and are even meaningless in the universe we now know we live in. This makes it impossible to have a coherent big picture of the modern world that includes God. But we don't have to accept an impossible God or else no God. We can have a real God if we redefine (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  14. God, Freedom, and Evil.Alvin Plantinga - 1978 - Eerdmans.
    This book discusses and exemplifies the philosophy of religion, or philosophical reflection on central themes of religion.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   160 citations  
  15. The God of Philosophers.Anthony Kenny - 1979 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Based on the Wilde Lectures in Natural Religion given by Anthony Kenny at Oxford from 1970 to 1972, here revised in light of recent discussion and reflection, this provocative book examines some of the principal attributes traditionally ascribed to God in western theism, particularly omniscience and omnipotence. From his discussion of a number of related topics, including a comprehensive treatment of the problem of the relations between divine foreknowledge and human freedom, Kenny concludes that there can be no such being (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  16.  7
    God Over All: Divine Aseity and the Challenge of Platonism.William Lane Craig - 2016 - Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press UK.
    God Over All: Divine Aseity and the Challenge of Platonism is a defense of God's aseity and unique status as the Creator of all things apart from Himself in the face of the challenge posed by mathematical Platonism. After providing the biblical, theological, and philosophical basis for the traditional doctrine of divine aseity, William Lane Craig explains the challenge presented to that doctrine by the Indispensability Argument for Platonism, which postulates the existence of uncreated abstract objects. Craig provides detailed examination (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  17. God, Freedom, and Evil: Perspectives from Religion and Science.Joseph M. Życínvski - 2000 - Zygon 35 (3):653-664.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  13
    Rethinking God as Gift: Marion, Derrida, and the Limits of Phenomenology.Robyn Horner - 2001 - Fordham University Press.
    "At once rigorous, insightful, and accessible.... the most thorough study yet available on the phenomenological treatment of God as gift in Marion and Derrida. Invaluable reading for those concerned with the theological promise of contemporary Continental philosophy."-Thomas A. Carlson, University of California, Santa Barbara.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  19.  61
    God as a Managerial Stakeholder?Mark S. Schwartz - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 66 (2/3):291 - 306.
    Can or should God be considered a managerial stakeholder? While at first glance such a proposition might seem beyond the norms of stakeholder management theory or traditional management practice, further investigation suggests that there might be both theoretical and practical support for such a notion. This paper will make the argument that God both is and should be considered a managerial stakeholder for those businesspeople and business firms that accept that God exists and can affect the world. In doing so, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  20.  88
    God's Dice.Vasil Penchev - 2015 - In S. Oms, J. Martínez, M. García-Carpintero & J. Díez (eds.), Actas: VIII Conference of the Spanish Society for Logic, Methodology, and Philosophy of Sciences. Barcelona: Universitat de Barcelona. pp. 297-303.
    Einstein wrote his famous sentence "God does not play dice with the universe" in a letter to Max Born in 1920. All experiments have confirmed that quantum mechanics is neither wrong nor “incomplete”. One can says that God does play dice with the universe. Let quantum mechanics be granted as the rules generalizing all results of playing some imaginary God’s dice. If that is the case, one can ask how God’s dice should look like. God’s dice turns out to be (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. God and the Soul.Peter Thomas Geach - 1969 - London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.
  22.  37
    God in the Age of Science? A Critique of Religious Reason.Herman Philipse - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Herman Philipse puts forward a powerful new critique of belief in God. He examines the strategies that have been used for the philosophical defence of religious belief, and by careful reasoning casts doubt on the legitimacy of relying on faith instead of evidence, and on probabilistic arguments for the existence of God.
  23.  36
    Does God Exist?: An Answer for Today.Hans Küng - 1980 - Crossroad.
    Does God exist? The question implies another: Who is God? This book is meant to give an answer to both questions and to give reasons for this answer. Does God exist? Yes or no? Many are at a loss between belief and unbelief; they are undecided, skeptical. They are doubtful about their belief, but they are also doubtful about their doubting. There are still others who are proud of their doubting. Yet there remains a longing for certainty. Certainty? Whether Christians (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  24. God's problem of multiple choice.Lloyd Strickland - 2006 - Religious Studies 42 (2):141-157.
    A question that has been largely overlooked by philosophers of religion is how God would be able to effect a rational choice between two worlds of unsurpassable goodness. To answer this question, I draw a parallel with the paradigm cases of indifferent choice, including Buridan's ass, and argue that such cases can be satisfactorily resolved provided that the protagonists employ what Otto Neurath calls an ‘auxiliary motive’. I supply rational grounds for the employment of such a motive, and then argue (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  25. God, Possibility, and Kant.Robert Merrihew Adams - 2000 - Faith and Philosophy 17 (4):425-440.
    In one of his precritical works, Kant defends, as “the only possible” way of demonstrating the existence of God, an argument from the nature of possibility. Whereas Leibniz had argued that possibilities must be thought by God in order to obtain the ontological standing that they need, Kant argued that at least the most fundamental possibilities must be exemplified in God. Here Kant’s argument is critically examined in comparison with its Leibnizian predecessor, and it is suggested that an argument combining (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  26.  10
    God Is Not Eternal, Nor Are We.Jon Paul Sydnor - 2018 - Process Studies 47 (1):172-190.
    The association of God with eternity, and eternity with timelessness, harms Christian spiritual life. If eternity is superior to time, then God’s placement of human beings within time is ungenerous. Fortunately, the Christian concept of God as triune commends divine becoming through time. In particular, the social Trinitarian view that God is three persons united through love demands divine temporality. Relationality relies on change for its content. So, for God to be internally related, God must be internally timeful. Moreover, to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. God and eternal boredom.Vuko Andrić & Attila Tanyi - 2017 - Religious Studies 53 (1):51-70.
    God is thought to be eternal. Does this mean that he is timeless? Or is he, rather, omnitemporal? In this paper we want to show that God cannot be omnitemporal. Our starting point, which we take from Bernard Williams’ article on the Makropulos Case, is the intuition that it is inappropriate for persons not to become bored after a sufficiently long sequence of time has passed. If God were omnitemporal, he would suffer from boredom. But God is the greatest possible (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  28. God and the Struggle for Existence.Charles Frederick D'arcy, Burnett Hillman Streeter & L. Dougall - 1919 - Association Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  32
    God and Goodness: A Natural Theological Perspective.Mark Wynn - 1999 - Routledge.
    God and Goodness takes the experience of value as a starting point for natural theology. Mark Wynn argues that theism offers our best understanding of the goodness of the world, especially its beauty and openness to the development of richer and more complex material forms. We also see that the world's goodness calls for a moral response: commitment to the goodness of the world represents a natural extension of the trust to which we aspire in our dealings with human beings.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  30. God, Soul and the Meaning of Life.Thaddeus Metz - 2019 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Part of the Elements Philosophy of Religion series, this short book focuses on the spiritual dimensions of life’s meaning as they have been discussed in the recent English and mainly analytic philosophical literature. The overarching philosophical question that this literature has addressed is about the extent to which, and respects in which, spiritual realities such as God or a soul would confer meaning on our lives. There have been four broad answers to the question, namely: God or a soul is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  31.  12
    God Beyond the Boundary-Stones of Thought.Abbas Ahsan - 2020 - American Journal of Islam and Society 37 (3-4):50-97.
    In this paper I make the case for epistemic relativism: the radical view that all human knowledge/truth is relative. I extend the application of epistemic relativism to include necessary laws such as the laws of logic. I argue that the truth of such laws are relative to human thought, which are ultimately instances derived from our experiences. These experiences act as limitations to which we are conceptually bound. As a result of this, we cannot apprehend God’s omnipotence. This includes God’s (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  32. Must God create the best?Robert Merrihew Adams - 1972 - Philosophical Review 81 (3):317-332.
  33. God and Moral Obligation.C. Stephen Evans - 2013 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    God and moral obligations -- What is a divine command theory of moral obligation? -- The relation of divine command theory to natural law and virtue ethics -- Objections to divine command theory -- Alternatives to a divine command theory -- Conclusions: The inescapability of moral obligations.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  34. God’s creatures? Divine nature and the status of animals in the early modern beast-machine controversy.Lloyd Strickland - 2013 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 74 (4):291-309.
    In early modern times it was not uncommon for thinkers to tease out from the nature of God various doctrines of substantial physical and metaphysical import. This approach was particularly fruitful in the so-called beast-machine controversy, which erupted following Descartes’ claim that animals are automata, that is, pure machines, without a spiritual, incorporeal soul. Over the course of this controversy, thinkers on both sides attempted to draw out important truths about the status of animals simply from the notion or attributes (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35. Playing God in Frankenstein’s Footsteps: Synthetic Biology and the Meaning of Life. [REVIEW]Henk van den Belt - 2009 - NanoEthics 3 (3):257-268.
    The emergent new science of synthetic biology is challenging entrenched distinctions between, amongst others, life and non-life, the natural and the artificial, the evolved and the designed, and even the material and the informational. Whenever such culturally sanctioned boundaries are breached, researchers are inevitably accused of playing God or treading in Frankenstein’s footsteps. Bioethicists, theologians and editors of scientific journals feel obliged to provide an authoritative answer to the ambiguous question of the ‘meaning’ of life, both as a scientific definition (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  36. Force (God) in Descartes' physics.Gary C. Hatfield - 1979 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 10 (2):113-140.
    It is difficult to evaluate the role of activity - of force or of that which has causal efficacy - in Descartes’ natural philosophy. On the one hand, Descartes claims to include in his natural philosophy only that which can be described geometrically, which amounts to matter (extended substance) in motion (where this motion is described kinematically).’ Yet on the other hand, rigorous adherence to a purely geometrical description of matter in motion would make it difficult to account for the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   67 citations  
  37.  6
    God and Cosmos: Moral Truth and Human Meaning.David Baggett & Jerry L. Walls - 2016 - New York: Oxford University Press USA.
    Naturalistic ethics is the reigning paradigm among contemporary ethicists; in God and Cosmos, Baggett and Walls argue that this approach is seriously flawed. This book canvasses a broad array of secular and naturalistic ethical theories in an effort to test their adequacy in accounting for moral duties, intrinsic human value, prospects for radical moral transformation, and the rationality of morality. In each case, the authors argue, although various secular accounts provide real insights and indeed share common ground with theistic ethics, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  38. God, mind, and logical space: a revisionary approach to divinity.István Aranyosi - 2013 - New York, NY: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    In God, Mind and Logical Space István Aranyosi takes the reader on a journey for the mind by revisiting the fundamental questions and the everlasting debates in philosophy of religion, ontology, and the philosophy of mind. The first part deals with issues in ontology, and the author puts forward a radical view according to which all thinkable objects and states of affairs have an equal claim to existence in a way that renders existence a relative notion. In the second part (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  39. God, Time and the Kalām Cosmological Argument.Christopher Alan Bobier - 2013 - Sophia 52 (4):593-600.
    The Kalām cosmological argument deploys the following causal principle: whatever begins to exist has a cause. Yet, under what conditions does something ‘begin to exist’? What does it mean to say that ‘X begins to exist at t’? William Lane Craig has offered and defended various accounts that seek to establish the necessary and sufficient conditions for when something ‘begins to exist.’ I argue that all of the accounts that William Lane Craig has offered fail on the following grounds: either (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  40. God Acts in the Quantum World.Bradley Monton - 2014 - In Jonathan L. Kvanvig (ed.), Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion Volume 5. Oxford University Press.
    Suppose that God exists, and that God does not violate the laws of nature he created for the world. God can nevertheless act in the world, by acting at the indeterministic quantum level. This chapter makes two specific points about God’s quantum action. First, on some ways of understanding quantum mechanics (specifically, the GRW theory, and the associated Continuous Spontaneous Localization theories), God’s actions are almost unlimited, contrary to those who say that God would be quite constrained in his action, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  41.  99
    God and Moral Law: On the Theistic Explanation of Morality.Mark C. Murphy - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Does God's existence make a difference to how we explain morality? Mark C. Murphy critiques the two dominant theistic accounts of morality--natural law theory and divine command theory--and presents a novel third view. He argues that we can value natural facts about humans and their good, while keeping God at the centre of our moral explanations.
  42. God and Other Minds: A Study of the Rational Justification of Belief in God.Alvin Plantinga - 1967 - Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
    Can belief in God be rationally justified? Reviewing in detail traditional and modern arguments for and against the existence of God, Professor Plantinga concludes that they must all be judged unsuccessful. He then turns to the related philosophical problem of the existence of other minds, and defends the so-called analogical argument against current criticisms. He goes on to show, however, that although this argument affords us the best reasons we have for belief in other minds, it finally succumbs to the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   62 citations  
  43.  42
    Did God Guide Our Evolution? It from Bit?Moorad Alexanian - 2021 - Perspectives on Science and Christian Faith 73 (3):190-191.
    The study of man on Earth is a historical science akin to forensic science and is best conducted with the truth of scripture in mind. Surely, this approach is quite consistent with Bussey’s argument since the presence of God is needed in our spacetime to create not only life and mind but also human beings in God’s image.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  53
    Does God Know that the Flower in My Hand Is Red? Avicenna and the Problem of God’s Perceptual Knowledge.Amirhossein Zadyousefi - 2020 - Sophia 59 (4):657-693.
    God is omniscient; therefore, He knows that ‘the flower in my hand is red.’ If God knows that ‘the flower in my hand is red,’ then He knows it perceptually. God does not know anything perceptually. It is clear that the set of propositions – form an inconsistent triad. This is one of four problems with which Avicenna was engaged concerning God's knowledge of particulars, which I call the problem of perceptual knowledge. In order to solve PPK and three other (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  45.  59
    God Without Being: Hors Texte.Jean-Luc Marion - 1991 - University of Chicago Press.
    Jean-Luc Marion advances a controversial argument for a God free of all categories of Being. Taking a characteristically postmodern stance, Marion challenges a fundamental premise of both metaphysics and neo-Thomist theology: that God, before all else, must be. Rather, he locates a "God without Being" in the realm of agape, of Christian charity or love. This volume, the first translation into English of the work of this leading Catholic philosopher, offers a contemporary perspective on the nature of God. "An immensely (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  46.  2
    God in Patristic Thought.George Leonard Prestige - 1936 - Toronto, W. Heinemann.
    This book assembles the evidence for what the Greek Fathers, the men whose contructive thought underlies the creeds, really thought and taught about the nature of God. It shows that they were original thinkers, with a profound reverence for the text of the Scriptures, and minds keenly tranined to discuss what ultimate truths were expressed in the scriptural text and what reality should be ascribed to Christian religious experience. The results indicate that a good deal which is assumed in current (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  47. God, Laws, and the Order of Nature: Descartes and Leibniz, Hobbes, and Spinoza.Daniel Garber - 2013 - In Eric Watkins (ed.), The Divine Order, The Human Order, and the Order of Nature. Oxford University Press. pp. 45-66.
  48.  39
    God and the Numbers.Paul Studtmann - manuscript
    According to Augustine, abstract objects are ideas in the Mind of God. Because numbers are a type of abstract object, it would follow that numbers are ideas in the Mind of God. Let us call such a view the Augustinian View of Numbers (AVN). In this paper, I present a formal theory for AVN. The theory stems from the symmetry conception of God as it appears in Studtmann (2021). I show that Robinson’s Arithmetic, Q, can be interpreted by the theory (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  31
    Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience.William P. Alston - 1993 - Cornell University Press.
    In this clear and provocative account of the epistemology of religious experience, William P. Alston argues that the perception of God—his term for direct experiential awareness of God—makes a major contribution to the grounds of religious belief. Surveying the variety of reported direct experiences of God, Alston demonstrates that a person can be justified in holding certain beliefs about God on the basis of mystical experience.
    No categories
  50.  3
    God the Problem.Gordon D. Kaufman - 1972 - Cambridge: Mass., Harvard University Press.
    The most discussed and most significant issue on the religious scene today is whether it is possible, or even desirable, to believe in God. Mr. Kaufman's valuable study does not offer a doctrine of God, but instead explores why God is a problem for many moderns, the dimensions of that problem, and the inner logic of the notion of God as it has developed in Western culture. His object is to determine the function or significance of talk about God: how (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000