Results for 'God'

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  1. Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience.William P. Alston - 1991 - Cornell University Press.
    Introduction i. Character of the Book The central thesis of this book is that experiential awareness of God, or as I shall be saying, the perception of (...)
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  2. God and Necessity.Brian Leftow - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Modal basics -- Some solutions -- Theist solutions -- The ontology of possibility -- Modal truthmakers -- Modality and the divine nature -- Deity as essential -- Against deity theories -- The (...)role of deity -- The biggest bang -- Divine concepts -- Concepts, syntax, and actualism -- Modality: basic notions -- The genesis of secular modality -- Modal reality -- Essences -- Non-secular modalities -- Theism and modal semantics -- Freedom, preference, and cost -- Explaining modal status -- Explaining the necessary -- Against theistic platonism -- Worlds and the existence of God. (shrink)
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  3. Does God Have a Nature.Alvin Plantinga - 1962 - Marquette University Press.
    Sets of contingent objects, perhaps, are as contingent as their members; but properties, propositions, numbers and states of affairs, it seems, are objects whose non-existence is (...)quite impossible. If so, however, how are they related to God? Suppose God has a nature: a property he has essentially that includes each property essential to him. Does God have a nature? And if he does, is there a conflict between God's sovereignty and his having a nature? How is God related to such abstract objects as properties and propositions? These are the questions I want to explore. - Introduction. (shrink)
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  4. God, Freedom, and Evil.Alvin Plantinga - 1978 - Eerdmans.
    This book discusses and exemplifies the philosophy of religion, or philosophical reflection on central themes of religion.
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  5.  4
    Of God Who Comes to Mind.Emmanuel Lévinas - 1998 - Stanford University Press.
    Emmanuel Levinas is one of the most original philosophers in the twentieth century. In this book, continuing his thought on obligation, he investigates the possibility that the (...)
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  6. God and the Soul.P. T. Geach - 1969 - London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.
  7.  34
    God in the Age of Science?: A Critique of Religious Reason.Herman Philipse - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Herman Philipse puts forward a powerful new critique of belief in God. He examines the strategies that have been used for the philosophical defence of religious belief, (...)
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  8. God and Moral Obligation.C. Stephen Evans - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    God and moral obligations -- What is a divine command theory of moral obligation? -- The relation of divine command theory to natural law and virtue ethics -- Objections (...)
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  9. Playing God and the Intrinsic Value of Life: Moral Problems for Synthetic Biology?Hans-Jürgen Link - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):435-448.
    Most of the reports on synthetic biology include not only familiar topics like biosafety and biosecurity but also a chapter onethical concerns’; a variety of diffuse (...)
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  10.  8
    Gods Own Ethics.Mark C. Murphy - 2017 - Oxford University Press.
    Mark C. Murphy addresses the question of how God's ethics differs from human ethics. Murphy suggests that God is not subject to the moral norms to (...)which we humans are subject. This has immediate implications for the argument from evil: we cannot assume that an absolutely perfect being is in any way bound to prevent the evils of this world. (shrink)
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  11. God and Dispositional Essentialism: An Account of the Laws of Nature.Dani Adams - 2018 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 99 (2):293-316.
    It is common to appeal to governing laws of nature in order to explain the existence of natural regularities. Classical theism, however, maintains the sovereignty thesis: everything (...)
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  12.  45
    God, the Best, and Evil.Bruce Langtry - 2008 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    God, the Best, and Evil is an original treatment of notable problems about God and his actions towards human beings. Three main topics are investigated in detail. (...)
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  13. God and Other Minds: A Study of the Rational Justification of Belief in God.Alvin Plantinga - 1967 - Cornell University Press.
    Can belief in God be rationally justified? Reviewing in detail traditional and modern arguments for and against the existence of God, Professor Plantinga concludes that they must (...)
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  14.  9
    Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience.William P. Alston - 1993 - Cornell University Press.
    In this clear and provocative account of the epistemology of religious experience, William P. Alston argues that the perception of Godhis term for direct experiential awareness (...)of Godmakes a major contribution to the grounds of religious belief. Surveying the variety of reported direct experiences of God, Alston demonstrates that a person can be justified in holding certain beliefs about God on the basis of mystical experience. (shrink)
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  15. Force (God) in Descartes' Physics.Gary C. Hatfield - 1979 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 10 (2):113-140.
    It is difficult to evaluate the role of activity - of force or of that which has causal efficacy - in Descartesnatural philosophy. On the one hand, (...)Descartes claims to include in his natural philosophy only that which can be described geometrically, which amounts to matter (extended substance) in motion (where this motion is described kinematically).’ Yet on the other hand, rigorous adherence to a purely geometrical description of matter in motion would make it difficult to account for the interactions among the particles that constitute Descartesuniverse, since the notions of extension and kinematical motion do not in themselves imply any causal agency. There is, after all, no reason to expect that a particle whose single essence is extension, even if we suppose it to be moving, should impart motion to another particle, while conversely, there is no reason to expect a resting particle to hinder the motion of an impinging one. Descartes' hankering for an austere ontology of matter in motion is in danger of excluding causal agency (force, conceived dynmically) from matter. To the modern reader it may seem obvious that Descartes did not get himself into such a fix, since matter in motion so readily reminds us of kinetic energy or of some more primitive notion of force. Yet by no means is it obvious that Descartes attributed causal efficacy to matter in motion per se. Serious scholars have held opposite positions on this issue. Westfall, Gabbey, and othershave argued that although on the metaphysical plane Descartes attempted to eliminate force from his mechanical universe, nonethelessforce is a real featureof his mechanical world. The thrust of this view is that Descartes conceived of force asthe capacity of a body in motion to act’, by means of impact, upon other bodies. An opposing interpretation, defended here, is that Descartes did in fact deny causal agency to moving matter per se, restricting agency to immaterial substances such as the human mind, angels, and God. The intention of this interpretation is not to de-emphasize the role of matter in motion in Descartesexplanation of nature, but rather to stress the fact that Descartes did not conceive of this moving matter dynamically. -/- Reprinted in Descartes, ed. by J. Cottingham, Oxford Readings in Philosophy (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998), 281310. (shrink)
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  16. The God of the Philosophers.Anthony Kenny - 1979 - Duke University Press.
    Based on the Wilde Lectures in Natural Religion given by Anthony Kenny at Oxford from 1970 to 1972, here revised in light of recent discussion and reflection, (...)
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  17.  88
    God and Moral Law: On the Theistic Explanation of Morality.Mark C. Murphy - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Does God's existence make a difference to how we explain morality? Mark C. Murphy critiques the two dominant theistic accounts of morality--natural law theory and divine (...) command theory--and presents a novel third view. He argues that we can value natural facts about humans and their good, while keeping God at the centre of our moral explanations. (shrink)
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  18. God Meets Satans Apple: the Paradox of Creation.Rubio Daniel - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (12):2987-3004.
    It is now the majority view amongst philosophers and theologians that any world could have been better. This places the choice of which world to create into (...)
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  19.  12
    Rethinking God as Gift: Marion, Derrida, and the Limits of Phenomenology.Robyn Horner - 2001 - Fordham University Press.
    "At once rigorous, insightful, and accessible.... the most thorough study yet available on the phenomenological treatment of God as gift in Marion and Derrida. Invaluable reading for (...)
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  20. God, Philosophy, Universities: A Selective History of the Catholic Philosophical Tradition.Alasdair MacIntyre - 2009 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Alasdair MacIntyre has written a selective history of the Catholic philosophical tradition, designed to show how belief in God informed and informs philosophical enquiry in different historical (...)
     
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  21.  22
    Maximal God: A New Defence of Perfect Being Theism.Yujin Nagasawa - 2017 - Oxford University Press.
    Yujin Nagasawa presents a new, stronger version of perfect being theism, the conception of God as the greatest possible being. Nagasawa argues that God should be understood, (...)
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  22. Can God Satisfice?Klaas J. Kraay - 2013 - American Philosophical Quarterly 50 (4):399-410.
    Three very prominent arguments for atheism are (1) the argument from sub-optimality, (2) the problem of no best world, and (3) the evidential argument from gratuitous (...)evil. To date, it has not sufficiently been appreciated that several important criticisms of these arguments have all relied on a shared strategy. Although the details vary, the core of this strategy is to concede that God either cannot or need not achieve the best outcome in the relevant choice situation, but to insist that God must and can achieve an outcome that is good enough. In short, this strategy invokes divine satisficing in response to these arguments for atheism. (The widespread use of this strategy may have gone unnoticed because the appeal to divine satisficing is usually implicit.) In sections 13, the three arguments for atheism will be set out, and it will be shown that the relevant replies all employ this shared strategy. Section 4 will show that those who invoke divine satisficing have failed to establish that this is a coherent notion. Accordingly, these replies to three important arguments for atheism are, at present, incomplete. (shrink)
     
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  23.  77
    Strangers, Gods, and Monsters: Interpreting Otherness.Richard Kearney - 2002 - Routledge.
    Strangers, Gods and Monster is a fascinating look at how human identity is shaped by three powerful but enigmatic forces. Often overlooked in accounts of how we (...)
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  24. God Knows (but Does God Believe?).Dylan Murray, Justin Sytsma & Jonathan Livengood - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 166 (1):83-107.
    The standard view in epistemology is that propositional knowledge entails belief. Positive arguments are seldom given for this entailment thesis, however; instead, its truth is typically assumed. (...)
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  25.  28
    God, Death, and Time.Emmanuel Levinas - 2000 - Stanford University Press.
    This book consists of transcripts from two lecture courses on ethical relation Levinas delivered at the Sorbonne.
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  26. The God Who May Be: A Hermeneutics of Religion.Richard Kearney - 2001 - Indiana University Press.
    Engaging some of the most recent and more urgent issues in the philosophy of religion today, in this lively book Richard Kearney proposes that instead of thinking (...)
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  27. Playing God in Frankensteins Footsteps: Synthetic Biology and the Meaning of Life[REVIEW]Henk van den Belt - 2009 - NanoEthics 3 (3):257-268.
    The emergent new science of synthetic biology is challenging entrenched distinctions between, amongst others, life and non-life, the natural and the artificial, the evolved and the (...)designed, and even the material and the informational. Whenever such culturally sanctioned boundaries are breached, researchers are inevitably accused of playing God or treading in Frankensteins footsteps. Bioethicists, theologians and editors of scientific journals feel obliged to provide an authoritative answer to the ambiguous question of themeaningof life, both as a scientific definition and as an explication with wider existential connotations. This article analyses the arguments mooted in the emerging societal debates on synthetic biology and the way its practitioners respond to criticism, mostly by assuming a defiant posture or professing humility. It explores the relationship between theplaying Godtheme and the Frankenstein motif and examines the doctrinal status of theplaying Godargument. One particularly interesting finding is that liberal theologians generally deny the religious character of theplaying Godargumenta response which fits in with the curious fact that this argument is used mainly by secular organizations. Synthetic biology, it is therefore maintained, does not offend so much the God of the Bible as a deified Nature. While syntheses of artificial life forms cause some vague uneasiness that life may lose its special meaning, most concerns turn out to be narrowly anthropocentric. As long as synthetic biology creates only new microbial life and does not directly affect human life, it will in all likelihood be considered acceptable. (shrink)
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  28.  65
    God and the Soul.Antony Flew & Peter Geach - 1970 - Philosophical Quarterly 20 (79):189.
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  29.  4
    Can God Be Free?William L. Rowe - 2003 - Clarendon Press.
    Can God Be Free? is a penetrating study of a central problem in philosophy of religion: can it be right to regard God as free, and as (...)
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  30.  1
    God in the Age of Science?: A Critique of Religious Reason.Herman Philipse - 2012 - Oxford University Press UK.
    God in the Age of Science? is a critical examination of strategies for the philosophical defence of religious belief. Herman Philipse argues that the most promising for (...)
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  31. God Acts in the Quantum World.Bradley Monton - 2014 - In Jonathan L. Kvanvig (ed.), Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion Volume 5. Oxford University Press.
    Suppose that God exists, and that God does not violate the laws of nature he created for the world. God can nevertheless act in the world, by (...)
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  32. Does God Matter?: Essays on the Axiological Consequences of Theism.Klaas Kraay (ed.) - 2017 - Routledge.
    The question of whether God exists has long preoccupied philosophers. Many accounts of God have been proposed, and many arguments for and against Gods existence have (...)been offered and discussed. But while philosophers have been busy trying to determine whether or not God exists, they have generally neglected to ask this question: "Does it _matter _whether God exists?" _Does God Matter?_ features ten original essays written by prominent philosophers of religion that address this very important, yet surprisingly neglected, question. One natural way to approach this question is to seek to understand what difference Gods existence wouldor doesmake to the value of the world and the well-being of its inhabitants. The three essays in Section I defend versions of _pro-theism_: the view that Gods existence would, or does, make things better than they would otherwise be. The three subsequent essays in Section II defend _anti-theism_: the view that Gods existence would, or does, make things worse than they would otherwise be. The final four essays in Section III consider the interplay between the existential and axiological debates concerning the existence of God. This book presents important research on a growing topic in philosophy of religion that will also be of keen interest to scholars working in other areas of philosophy, and in other disciplines. (shrink)
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  33. Could God Create Darwinian Accidents?John S. Wilkins - 2012 - Zygon 47 (1):30-42.
    Abstract Charles Darwin, in his discussions with Asa Gray and in his published works, doubted whether God could so arrange it that exactly the desired contingent events (...)
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  34.  11
    Does God Exist?: An Answer for Today.Hans Küng - 1980 - Crossroad.
    Does God exist? The question implies another: Who is God? This book is meant to give an answer to both questions and to give reasons for this (...)
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  35. Saving God: Religion After Idolatry.Mark Johnston - 2009 - Princeton University Press.
    In this book, Mark Johnston argues that God needs to be saved not only from the distortions of the "undergraduate atheists" but, more importantly, from the idolatrous (...)
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  36. God and Eternal Boredom.Vuko Andrić & Attila Tanyi - 2017 - Religious Studies 53 (1):51-70.
    God is thought to be eternal. Does this mean that he is timeless? Or is he, rather, omnitemporal? In this paper we want to show that God (...)
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  37. God, Foreknowledge, and Freedom.John Martin Fischer - 1991 - Stanford University Press.
    Introduction: God and Freedom John Martin Fischer Imagine that in some remote part of Connecticut there is a computer that has stored in its memory all truths (...)
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  38.  57
    God Without Being: Hors Texte.Jean-Luc MARION - 1991 - University of Chicago Press.
    Jean-Luc Marion advances a controversial argument for a God free of all categories of Being. Taking a characteristically postmodern stance, Marion challenges a fundamental premise of (...)both metaphysics and neo-Thomist theology: that God, before all else, must be. Rather, he locates a "God without Being" in the realm of agape, of Christian charity or love. This volume, the first translation into English of the work of this leading Catholic philosopher, offers a contemporary perspective on the nature of God. "An immensely thoughtful book. . . . It promises a rich harvest. Marion's highly original treatment of the idol and the icon, the Eucharist, boredom and vanity, conversion and prayer takes theological and philosophical discussions to a new level."--Norman Wirzba, Christian Century. (shrink)
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  39.  32
    Good God: The Theistic Foundations of Morality.David Baggett - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    This book aims to reinvigorate discussions of moral arguments for God's existence.
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  40.  57
    God as a Managerial Stakeholder?Mark S. Schwartz - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 66 (2/3):291 - 306.
    Can or should God be considered a managerial stakeholder? While at first glance such a proposition might seem beyond the norms of stakeholder management theory or traditional (...)
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  41. God the Problem.Gordon D. Kaufman - 1972 - Cambridge: Mass., Harvard University Press.
    The most discussed and most significant issue on the religious scene today is whether it is possible, or even desirable, to believe in God. Mr. Kaufman's (...)valuable study does not offer a doctrine of God, but instead explores why God is a problem for many moderns, the dimensions of that problem, and the inner logic of the notion of God as it has developed in Western culture. His object is to determine the function or significance of talk about God: how the concept of God is generated in human experience; the special problems in turn generated by this concept (for example, the intelligibility of the idea of transcendence, the problem of theodicy) and how they are met; and under what circumstances the idea of God is credible or important or even indispensable. He does not try to prove God's existence or nonexistence, but elucidates what the concept of God means and the important human needs it fulfills. Four of the eleven essays have been previously published, at least in part; seven are completely new. (shrink)
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  42.  4
    God and Meaning: New Essays.Joshua W. Seachris & Stewart Goetz - 2016 - New York, NY, USA: Bloomsbury.
    Over the past decade, there has been a growing interest among analytic philosophers in life's meaning, but this surge of work is nearly all by naturalists (...)theorizing from non-theistic starting points. To answer the need for a theistic philosophical perspective, God and Meaning features leading thinkers in analytic philosophy of religion and theology exploring important issues in metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and biblical theology that intersect with life's meaning. (shrink)
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  43. God, Science and Naturalism.Paul Draper - 2005 - In William J. Wainwright (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press.
    It is widely claimed in recent years that science and theology can and do interact harmoniously. This chapter, however, explores some areas of potential conflict. Specifically, it (...)
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  44. God, Fine-Tuning, and the Problem of Old Evidence.Bradley Monton - 2006 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (2):405-424.
    The fundamental constants that are involved in the laws of physics which describe our universe are finely-tuned for life, in the sense that if some of (...)the constants had slightly different values life could not exist. Some people hold that this provides evidence for the existence of God. I will present a probabilistic version of this fine-tuning argument which is stronger than all other versions in the literature. Nevertheless, I will show that one can have reasonable opinions such that the fine-tuning argument doesnt lead to an increase in ones probability for the existence of God. (shrink)
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  45.  46
    God, Chance and Purpose: Can God Have It Both Ways.David J. Bartholomew - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    The thesis of this book is that chance is neither unreal nor non-existent but an integral part of God's creation.
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  46.  1
    God in Patristic Thought.George Leonard Prestige - 1936 - Toronto, W. Heinemann.
    This book assembles the evidence for what the Greek Fathers, the men whose contructive thought underlies the creeds, really thought and taught about the nature of God. (...)
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  47. Does God Have the Moral Standing to Blame?Patrick Todd - 2018 - Faith and Philosophy 35 (1):33-55.
    In this paper, I introduce a problem to the philosophy of religionthe problem of divine moral standingand explain how this problem is distinct from ( (...)albeit related to) the more familiar problem of evil (with which it is often conflated). In short, the problem is this: in virtue of how God would be (or, on some given conception, is) “involved inour actions, how is it that God has the moral standing to blame us for performing those very actions? In light of the recent literature onmoral standing”, I consider Gods moral standing to blame on two models ofdivine providence”: open theism, and theological determinism. I contend that God may have standing on open theism, andperhaps surprisinglymay also have standing, even on theological determinism, given the truth of compatibilism. Thus, if you think that God could not justly both determine and blame, then you will have to abandon compatibilism. The topic of this paper thus sheds considerable light on the traditional philosophical debate about the conditions of moral responsibility. (shrink)
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  48.  14
    Eternal God: A Study of God Without Time.Paul Helm - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    Paul Helm presents a new, expanded edition of his much praised 1988 book Eternal God, which defends the view that God exists in timeless eternity. Helm argues (...)
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  49. Cutting God in Half - And Putting the Pieces Together Again: A New Approach to Philosophy.Nicholas Maxwell - 2010 - Pentire Press.
    Cutting God in Half argues that, in order to tackle climate change, world poverty, extinction of species and our other global problems rather better than we are (...)
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  50.  89
    God of the Gaps: a Neglected Reply to Gods Stone Problem.Jc Beall & A. J. Cotnoir - 2017 - Analysis 77 (4):681-689.
    Traditional monotheism has long faced logical puzzles. We argue that such puzzles rest on the assumed logical truth of the Law of Excluded Middle, which we suggest (...)
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