101 found
Order:
Disambiguations
George Sher [100]George Allen Sher [1]George A. Sher [1]
  1.  65
    Who Knew?: Responsiblity Without Awareness.George Sher - 2009 - New York, US: Oxford University Press USA.
    To be responsible for their acts, agents must both perform those acts voluntarily and in some sense know what they are doing. Of these requirements, the voluntariness condition has been much discussed, but the epistemic condition has received far less attention. In Who Knew? George Sher seeks to rectify that imbalance. The book is divided in two halves, the first of which criticizes a popular but inadequate way of understanding the epistemic condition, while the second seeks to develop a more (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   131 citations  
  2.  37
    Women and Moral Theory.Eva Feder Kittay, Carol Gilligan, Annette C. Baier, Michael Stocker, Christina H. Sommers, Kathryn Pyne Addelson, Virginia Held, Thomas E. Hill Jr, Seyla Benhabib, George Sher, Marilyn Friedman, Jonathan Adler, Sara Ruddick, Mary Fainsod, David D. Laitin, Lizbeth Hasse & Sandra Harding - 1987 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    To find more information about Rowman and Littlefield titles, please visit www.rowmanlittlefield.com.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   118 citations  
  3.  86
    In Praise of Blame.George Sher - 2005 - New York, US: Oup Usa.
    Blame is an unpopular and neglected notion: it goes against the grain of a therapeutically-oriented culture and has been far less discussed by philosophers than such related notions as responsibility and punishment. This book seeks to show that neither the opposition nor the neglect is justified. The book's most important conclusion is that blame is inseperable from morality itself - that any considerations that justify us in accepting a set of moral principles must also call for the condemnation of those (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   91 citations  
  4. In Praise of Blame.George Sher - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 137 (1):19-30.
    In his In Praise of Blame, George Sher aims to provide an analysis and defense of blame. In fact, he aims to provide an analysis that will itself yield a defense by allowing him to argue that morality and blame "stand or fall together." He thus opposes anyone who recommends jettisoning blame while preserving morality. In this comment, I examine Sher's defense of blame. Though I am much in sympathy with Sher's strategy of defending blame by providing an analysis that (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   141 citations  
  5.  10
    A Wild West of the Mind.George Sher - 2021 - New York, USA: Oxford University Press.
    This book addresses two main topics—first, the morality of thought and, second, what’s involved in having a free mind. It connects these topics by arguing that to have a free mind, a person must be willing to follow his thoughts wherever they lead, and that this just isn’t possible if the person thinks that some thoughts are morally off limits. The book therefore defends the unpopular position that it is not morally wrong to have even the nastiest of attitudes, the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  6.  74
    Desert.George Sher - 1987 - Princeton University Press.
    "--Jeffrie Murphy, The Philosophical Review (forthcoming).
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   55 citations  
  7.  16
    Desert.George Sher - 1987 - Princeton University Press.
    The description for this book, Desert, will be forthcoming.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   52 citations  
  8. A Wild West of the Mind.George Sher - 2019 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 97 (3):483-496.
    abstractThis paper addresses the relation between morality and private thought. It is widely agreed that government and society have no business trying to control our thoughts—that, as long as we d...
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  9.  46
    Beyond Neutrality: Perfectionism and Politics.George Sher - 1997 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Many people, including many contemporary philosophers, believe that the state has no business trying to improve people's characters, elevating their tastes, or preventing them from living degraded lives. They believe that governments should remain absolutely neutral when it comes to the consideration of competing conceptions of the good. One fundamental aim of George Sher's book is to show that this view is indefensible. A second complementary aim is to articulate a conception of the good that is worthy of promotion by (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  10. Too Much Morality.George Sher - 2023 - Public Affairs Quarterly 37 (2):125-137.
    This paper is a critical discussion of the recent tendency to moralize various aspects of life that were previously viewed as private and discretionary. The paper takes as its starting point six recently unearthed moral prohibitions, and it examines the prospects for defending each as an extension of some familiar moral requirement. Its conclusion is not only that none of the extended prohibitions are defensible, but also that each impedes morality's function by limiting the ability of those whose lives it (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11. Equality for Inegalitarians.George Sher - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers a new and compelling account of distributive justice and its relation to choice. Unlike luck egalitarians, who treat unchosen differences in people's circumstances as sources of unjust inequality to be overcome, Sher views such differences as pervasive and unavoidable features of the human situation. Appealing to an original account of what makes us moral equals, he argues that our interest in successfully negotiating life's ever-shifting contingencies is more basic than our interest in achieving any more specific goals. (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  12. But I Could Be Wrong.George Sher - 2001 - Social Philosophy and Policy 18 (2):64.
    My aim in this essay is to explore the implications of the fact that even our most deeply held moral beliefs have been profoundly affected by our upbringing and experience—that if any of us had had a sufficiently different upbringing and set of experiences, he almost certainly would now have a very different set of moral beliefs and very different habits of moral judgment. This fact, together with the associated proliferation of incompatible moral doctrines, is sometimes invoked in support of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  13.  46
    Desert.Jeffrie G. Murphy & George Sher - 1990 - Philosophical Review 99 (2):280.
  14. Desert.George Sher - 1991 - Ethics 101 (2):409-411.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   49 citations  
  15. Out of control.George Sher - 2006 - Ethics 116 (2):285-301.
  16. Ancient wrongs and modern rights.George Sher - 1981 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 10 (1):3-17.
  17. Transgenerational Compensation.George Sher - 2005 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 33 (2):181-200.
  18. Desert.George Sher - 1989 - Ethics 99 (2):426-428.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  19.  27
    Morality Within the Limits of Reason.George Sher - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (4):682.
  20.  16
    Teleology.George Sher - 1977 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 38 (1):136-137.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  21. What makes a lottery fair?George Sher - 1980 - Noûs 14 (2):203-216.
  22. Justifying reverse discrimination in employment.George Sher - 1975 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 4 (2):159-170.
  23.  31
    Perfectionism and Neutrality: Essays in Liberal Theory.Bruce Ackerman, Richard J. Arneson, Ronald W. Dworkin, Gerald F. Gaus, Kent Greenawalt, Vinit Haksar, Thomas Hurka, George Klosko, Charles Larmore, Stephen Macedo, Thomas Nagel, John Rawls, Joseph Raz & George Sher - 2003 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Editors provide a substantive introduction to the history and theories of perfectionism and neutrality, expertly contextualizing the essays and making the collection accessible.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  24. Effort, ability, and personal desert.George Sher - 1979 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 8 (4):361-376.
  25.  17
    Punishment as Societal Defense.George Sher - 1999 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 59 (2):548-550.
  26. The Ethics of Social Punishment: The Enforcement of Morality in Everyday Life.Linda Radzik, Christopher Bennett, Glen Pettigrove & George Sher - 2020 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    How do we punish others socially, and should we do so? In her 2018 Descartes Lectures for Tilburg University, Linda Radzik explores the informal methods ordinary people use to enforce moral norms, such as telling people off, boycotting businesses, and publicly shaming wrongdoers on social media. Over three lectures, Radzik develops an account of what social punishment is, why it is sometimes permissible, and when it must be withheld. She argues that the proper aim of social punishment is to put (...)
  27.  18
    Moral Thinking: Its Levels, Method, and Point.George Sher - 1984 - Noûs 18 (1):179-184.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  28.  73
    Subsidized abortion: Moral rights and moral compromise.George Sher - 1981 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 10 (4):361-372.
  29.  44
    Diversity.George Sher - 1999 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 28 (2):85-104.
  30.  30
    Political Philosophy.George Sher & Jean Hampton - 1999 - Philosophical Review 108 (1):87.
    This book, which was completed just before Jean Hampton’s untimely death in April 1996, is an admirable hybrid. Although it successfully achieves its stated purpose of “acquaint[ing] the student of political philosophy both with [its] questions and with the various answers to them proposed by philosophers since the ancient Greeks”, it is, at the same time, quite an original work—one that can be read with real profit by professional philosophers as well as students.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  31.  59
    Responsibility Matters.Retribution Reconsidered: More Essays in the Philosophy of Law.Desert.Michael J. Zimmerman, Peter A. French, Jeffrie G. Murphy & George Sher - 1995 - Noûs 29 (2):248.
  32. Compensation and Transworld Personal Identity.George Sher - 1979 - The Monist 62 (3):378-391.
    A natural way of viewing compensation is to see it as the restoration of a good or level of well-being which someone would have enjoyed if he had not been adversely affected by the act of another. This view underlies Nozick’s assertion that “something fully compensates … person X for Y’s action A if X is no worse off receiving it, Y having done A, than X would have been without receiving it if Y had not done A”; and it (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  33.  50
    Living in the Moment is for Oysters.George Sher - 2024 - American Philosophical Quarterly 61 (1):19-28.
    The idea that we should simply live in the moment, and should not concern ourselves about the future or the past, has long been a staple of popular philosophy. In this paper, I first attempt to clarify the doctrine and then examine the case for accepting it. My conclusions are, first, that a number of its implications seem quite unpalatable; second, that the main advantages that living in the moment are said to yield are greatly overstated; and, third, that to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Kantian fairness.George Sher - 2005 - Philosophical Issues 15 (1):179–192.
    It is widely thought to be unfair to hold people responsible, or to blame or punish them, for wrongful acts or omissions that are beyond their control. Because this principle is often taken to support incompatibilism, and because it has led many to deny the possibility of moral luck, we might expect its normative underpinnings to have been carefully scrutinized. However, surprisingly, they have not. In the current paper, I will try to fill this gap by first reconstructing, and then (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  35.  98
    Blame for traits.George Sher - 2001 - Noûs 35 (1):146–161.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  36.  22
    On event-identity.George Sher - 1974 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 52 (1):39 – 47.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  37.  95
    Moral education and indoctrination.George Sher & William J. Bennett - 1982 - Journal of Philosophy 79 (11):665-677.
  38.  10
    Me, You, Us: Essays.George Sher - 2017 - New York, NY: Oup Usa.
    Me, You, Us addresses a range of issues in moral and political philosophy and moral psychology, but are unified by their starkly individualistic view of the moral subject. They challenge recent tendencies to conceptualize normative issues in terms of relationships, collectivities, and social meanings.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39.  47
    Ethics, Character, and Action.George Sher - 1998 - Social Philosophy and Policy 15 (1):1.
    According to one long-standing tradition, the organizing question of ethics is “What are we morally obligated to do?” However, many philosophers, inspired by an even older tradition, now urge a return to the question “What kind of person is it best to be?” According to these philosophers, the proper locus of evaluation is character rather than action, and the basic evaluative concept is virtue rather than duty. Following what has become common usage, I shall refer to the first approach as (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  40. Reverse discrimination, the future, and the past.George Sher - 1979 - Ethics 90 (1):81-87.
  41.  44
    Ethics: Essential Readings in Moral Theory.George Sher (ed.) - 2012 - Routledge.
    Ethics: Essential Readings in Moral Theory is an outstanding anthology of the most important topics, theories and debates in ethics, compiled by one of the leading experts in the field. It includes sixty-six extracts covering the central domains of ethics: why be moral? the meaning of moral language morality and objectivity consequentialism deontology virtue and character value and well-being moral psychology applications: including abortion, famine relief and consent. Included are both classical extracts from Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant and Mill, as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  42. Real-world luck egalitarianism.George Sher - 2010 - Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (1):218-232.
    Luck egalitarians maintain that inequalities are always unjust when they are due to luck, but are not always unjust when they are due to choices for which the parties are responsible. In this paper, I argue that the two halves of this formula do not fit neatly together, and that we arrive at one version of luck egalitarianism if we begin with the notion of luck and interpret responsible choice in terms of its absence, but a very different version if (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  43.  12
    Review Essay on Matt King, Simply Responsible.George Sher - forthcoming - The Journal of Ethics:1-8.
    This review essay discusses Matt King’s recent book Simply Responsible, in which he defends a unifying account of responsibility that spans not only moral responsibility, but also prudential and epistemic responsibility, among other forms. The first half of the essay summarizes the three key elements of King’s account--his treatment of basic responsibility, basic blame, and basic desert--while the second half takes a more critical look at each element.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  67
    Liberal Neutrality and the Value of Autonomy.George Sher - 1995 - Social Philosophy and Policy 12 (1):136-159.
    Many liberals believe that government should not base its decisions on any particular conception of the good life. Many believe, further, that this principle of neutrality is best defended through appeal to some normative principle about autonomy. In this essay, I shall discuss the prospects of mounting one such defense. I say only “one such defense” because neutralists can invoke the demands of autonomy in two quite different ways. They can argue, first, that because autonomy itself has such great value, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  45.  8
    Effort and imagination.George Sher - 2003 - In Serena Olsaretti (ed.), Desert and justice. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 205--217.
    Serena Olsaretti brings together new essays by leading moral and political philosophers on the nature of desert and justice, their relations with each other and with other values.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  46. Who’s in Charge Here?: Reply to Neil Levy.George Sher - 2008 - Philosophia 36 (2):223-226.
    In his response to my essay “Out of Control,” Neil Levy contests my claims that (1) we are often responsible for acts that we do not consciously choose to perform, and that (2) despite the absence of conscious choice, there remains a relevant sense in which these actions are within our control. In this reply to Levy, I concede that claim (2) is linguistically awkward but defend the thought that it expresses, and I clarify my defense of claim (1) by (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  47.  46
    Groups and justice.George Sher - 1977 - Ethics 87 (2):174-181.
  48.  38
    Right violations and injustices: Can we always avoid trade-offs?George Sher - 1984 - Ethics 94 (2):212-224.
  49. Talents and Choices.George Sher - 2012 - Noûs 46 (3):400-417.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50.  56
    Blameworthy Action and Character.George Sher - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (2):381-392.
    A number of philosophers from Hume on have claimed that it does not make sense to blame people for acting badly unless their bad acts were rooted in their characters. In this paper, I distinguish a stronger and a weaker version of this claim. The claim is false, I argue, if it is taken to mean that agents can only be blamed for bad acts when those acts are manifestations of character paws. However, what is both true and important is (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 101