Results for 'Gene Feder'

1000+ found
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  1.  12
    Clinical Guidelines Tensions: And Now Where? Commentary on 'Clinical Guidelines: Ways Ahead' (C.W.R. Onion and T. Walley, Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 4, 287–293, This Issue). [REVIEW]Gene Feder Bsc Mb Bs Md Frcgp - 1998 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 4 (4):299-300.
  2.  10
    Disrupted Breath, Songlines of Breathlessness: An Interdisciplinary Response.Alice Malpass, James Dodd, Gene Feder, Jane Macnaughton, Arthur Rose, Oriana Walker, Tina Williams & Havi Carel - 2019 - Medical Humanities 45 (3):294-303.
    Health research is often bounded by disciplinary expertise. While cross-disciplinary collaborations are often forged, the analysis of data which draws on more than one discipline at the same time is underexplored. Life of Breath, a 5-year project funded by the Wellcome Trust to understand the clinical, historical and cultural phenomenology of the breath and breathlessness, brings together an interdisciplinary team, including medical humanities scholars, respiratory clinicians, medical anthropologists, medical historians, cultural theorists, artists and philosophers. While individual members of the Life (...)
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  3. A Report From Germany—an Extract From the Prospects and Risks of Gene Technology: The Report of the Enquete Commission to the Bundestag of the Federal Republic of Germany.Enquete Commission - 1988 - Bioethics 2:254-263.
     
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  4.  9
    An Extract From Prospects and Risks of Gene Technology: The Report of the Enquete Commission to the Bundestag of the Federal Republic of Germany.Enquete Commission - 1988 - Bioethics 2 (3):254.
  5.  46
    Gene Therapy Oversight: Lessons for Nanobiotechnology.Susan M. Wolf, Rishi Gupta & Peter Kohlhepp - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (4):659-684.
    Oversight of human gene transfer research presents an important model with potential application to oversight of nanobiology research on human participants. Gene therapy oversight adds centralized federal review at the National Institutes of Health's Office of Biotechnology Activities and its Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee to standard oversight of human subjects research at the researcher's institution and at the federal level by the Office for Human Research Protections. The Food and Drug Administration's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research oversees (...)
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  6.  28
    RAC Oversight of Gene Transfer Research: A Model Worth Extending?Nancy M. P. King - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (3):381-389.
    Clinical gene transfer research has both a unique history and a complex and layered system of research oversight, featuring a unique review body, the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee. This paper briefly describes the process of decision-making about clinical GTR, considers whether the questions, problems, and issues raised in clinical GTR are unique, and concludes by examining whether the RAC's oversight is a useful model that should be reproduced for other similar areas of clinical research.Clinical GTR is governed by the (...)
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  7.  51
    Self-Critical Federal Science? The Ethics Experiment Within the U.S. Human Genome Project: ERIC T. JUENGST.Eric T. Juengst - 1996 - Social Philosophy and Policy 13 (2):63-95.
    On October 1, 1988, thirty-five years after co-discovering the structure of the DNA molecule, Dr. James Watson launched an unprecedented experiment in American science policy. In response to a reporter's question at a press conference, he unilaterally set aside 3 to 5 percent of the budget of the newly launched Human Genome Project to support studies of the ethical, legal, and social implications of new advances in human genetics. The Human Genome Project, by providing geneticists with the molecular maps of (...)
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  8.  23
    Protecting Posted Genes: Social Networking and the Limits of GINA.Sandra Soo-Jin Lee & Emily Borgelt - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (11):32-44.
    The combination of decreased genotyping costs and prolific social media use is fueling a personal genetic testing industry in which consumers purchase and interact with genetic risk information online. Consumers and their genetic risk profiles are protected in some respects by the 2008 federal Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA), which forbids the discriminatory use of genetic information by employers and health insurers; however, practical and technical limitations undermine its enforceability, given the everyday practices of online social networking and its impact (...)
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  9.  13
    Environmental Education—Ponderings From Down Under.Gene C. Sager - 2001 - Global Bioethics 14 (1):105-111.
    This article describes and reflects upon Australia's extensive, federally-mandated, environmental education program. This program is based on a National Conservation Strategy which went into effect in 1989. But the program has massive support on the state and local levels as well. In addition to traditional classroom study of the environment and environmental issues, Audtralian Students do composting, re-vegetation of local canyons, and other hands-on activities. In many areas of the students' deatiledreports become the data base for the government's environmental monitoring (...)
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  10.  9
    Budgets Versus Bans: How U.S. Law Restricts Germline Gene Editing.Josephine Johnston - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (2):4-5.
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  11.  1
    Patient Portal Access for Caregivers of Adult and Geriatric Patients: Reframing the Ethics of Digital Patient Communication.Teja Ganta, Jacob M. Appel & Nicholas Genes - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2021-107759.
    Patient portals are poised to transform health communication by empowering patients with rapid access to their own health data. The 21st Century Cures Act is a US federal law that, among other provisions, prevents health entities from engaging in practices that disrupt the exchange of electronic health information—a measure that may increase the usage of patient health portals. Caregiver access to patient portals, however, may lead to breaches in patient privacy and confidentiality if not managed properly through proxy accounts. We (...)
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  12.  38
    Public Expectations for Return of Results From Large-Cohort Genetic Research.Juli Murphy, Joan Scott, David Kaufman, Gail Geller, Lisa LeRoy & Kathy Hudson - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (11):36 – 43.
    The National Institutes of Health and other federal health agencies are considering establishing a national biobank to study the roles of genes and environment in human health. A preliminary public engagement study was conducted to assess public attitudes and concerns about the proposed biobank, including the expectations for return of individual research results. A total of 141 adults of different ages, incomes, genders, ethnicities, and races participated in 16 focus groups in six locations across the country. Focus group participants voiced (...)
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  13.  29
    Developing U.S. Oversight Strategies for Nanobiotechnology: Learning From Past Oversight Experiences.Jordan Paradise, Susan M. Wolf, Jennifer Kuzma, Aliya Kuzhabekova, Alison W. Tisdale, Efrosini Kokkoli & Gurumurthy Ramachandran - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (4):688-705.
    The emergence of nanotechnology, and specifically nanobiotechnology, raises major oversight challenges. In the United States, government, industry, and researchers are debating what oversight approaches are most appropriate. Among the federal agencies already embroiled in discussion of oversight approaches are the Food and Drug Administration , Environmental Protection Agency , Department of Agriculture , Occupational Safety and Health Administration , and National Institutes of Health . All can learn from assessment of the successes and failures of past oversight efforts aimed at (...)
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  14.  31
    23andMe: A New Two-Sided Data-Banking Market Model.Henri-Corto Stoeklé, Marie-France Mamzer-Bruneel, Guillaume Vogt & Christian Hervé - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1-11.
    BackgroundSince 2006, the genetic testing company 23andMe has collected biological samples, self-reported information, and consent documents for biobanking and research from more than 1,000,000 individuals, through a direct-to-consumer online genetic-testing service providing a genetic ancestry report and a genetic health report. However, on November 22, 2013, the Food and Drug Administration halted the sale of genetic health testing, on the grounds that 23andMe was not acting in accordance with federal law, by selling tests of undemonstrated reliability as predictive tests for (...)
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  15.  34
    The Hexamethonium Asthma Study and the Death of a Normal Volunteer in Research.J. Savulescu - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (1):3-4.
    Death of a normal volunteer highlights problems with research review and protection of subjectsHealthy volunteer dies in asthma studyOn July 19, after investigating the death of a previously healthy volunteer, the United States Office for Human Research Protections suspended nearly all federally funded medical research involving human subjects at Johns Hopkins University. The death has been described as “particularly disturbing” because 24 year old Ellen Roche was a healthy volunteer who had nothing to gain by taking part in the study.1 (...)
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  16.  16
    Public Health Preparedness Laws and Policies: Where Do We Go After Pandemic 2009 H1N1 Influenza?Jean O’Connor, Paul Jarris, Richard Vogt & Heather Horton - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (s1):51-55.
    The detection and spread of pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza in the United States led to a complex and multi-faceted response by the public health system that lasted more than a year. When the first domestic case of the virus was detected in California on April 15, 2009, and a second, unrelated case was identified more than 130 miles away in the same state on April 17, 2009, the unique combination of influenza virus genes in addition to its emergence and rapid (...)
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  17.  8
    Public Health Preparedness Laws and Policies: Where Do We Go After Pandemic 2009 H1N1 Influenza?Jean O’Connor, Paul Jarris, Richard Vogt & Heather Horton - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (s1):51-55.
    The detection and spread of pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza in the United States led to a complex and multi-faceted response by the public health system that lasted more than a year. When the first domestic case of the virus was detected in California on April 15, 2009, and a second, unrelated case was identified more than 130 miles away in the same state on April 17, 2009, the unique combination of influenza virus genes in addition to its emergence and rapid (...)
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  18.  23
    LeRoy Walters’s Legacy of Bioethics in Genetics and Biotechnology Policy.Robert Cook-Deegan & Stephen J. McCormack - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 29 (1):51-66.
    LeRoy Walters was a central figure in debates about federal policy regarding genetics and biotechnology—a neutral, publicly engaged philosopher and religious studies academic who put his skills to work in national service. His career spanned the emergence of biotechnology as a field in the 1970s until his retirement. His interests reached from moral philosophical theory to Holocaust studies to practical concerns about public policy in genetics. We focus here on the role of bioethics in policy related to the advent of (...)
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  19.  4
    Christian Love, Material Needs, and Dependent Care.Sandra Sullivan-Dunbar - 2009 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 29 (2):39-59.
    THE RECENT CONVERSATION WITHIN CHRISTIAN ETHICS ABOUT THE RELAtionship between universal obligations and particular, intensive relations—between agape and "special relations"—largely accepts Gene Outka's formulation that these are separate and competing moral claims that must be balanced within the Christian moral life. I examine the relationship between agape and special relations through the lens of dependency and dependent-care relations. Attention to dependent care and the material needs addressed within them raises questions about the sharp division between universal and particular obligations. (...)
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  20.  35
    Does the ADA Provide Protection Against Discrimination on the Basis of Genotype?Joseph S. Alper - 1995 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 23 (2):167-172.
    As a consequence of the problems caused by genetic discrimination, federal and state law makers are being pressured to pass a legislative remedy. A primary question is whether the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 applies to individuals with a potentially disabling genetic disorder who are pre-symptomatic or asymptomatic and may never become ill and to healthy individuals who are carriers of genetic conditions. At present, this question has relevance principally for individuals with the genotype for single gene disorders, (...)
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  21.  7
    Does the ADA Provide Protection Against Discrimination on the Basis of Genotype?Joseph S. Alper - 1995 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 23 (2):167-172.
    As a consequence of the problems caused by genetic discrimination, federal and state law makers are being pressured to pass a legislative remedy. A primary question is whether the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 applies to individuals with a potentially disabling genetic disorder who are pre-symptomatic or asymptomatic and may never become ill and to healthy individuals who are carriers of genetic conditions. At present, this question has relevance principally for individuals with the genotype for single gene disorders, (...)
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  22.  50
    Scientific Limitations and Ethical Ramifications of a Non-Representative Human Genome Project: African American Response. [REVIEW]Fatimah Jackson - 1998 - Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):155-170.
    The Human Genome Project (HGP) represents a massive merging of science and technology in the name of all humanity. While the disease aspects of HGP-generated data have received the greatest publicity and are the strongest rationale for the project, it should be remembered that the HGP has, as its goal the sequencing of all 100,000 human genes and the accurate depiction of the ancestral and functional relationships among these genes. The HGP will thus be constructing the molecular taxonomic norm for (...)
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  23.  8
    Beyond Best Practices: Strict Scrutiny as a Regulatory Model for Race-Specific Medicines.Osagie K. Obasogie - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (3):491-497.
    Race is becoming an increasingly common lens through which biomedical researchers are studying the relevance of genes to group predispositions that may affect disease susceptibility and drug response. These investigations contravene decades of research in the natural and social sciences demonstrating that social categories of race have little genetic significance. Nevertheless, a resounding debate has ensued over the utility of race in biomedical research — particularly as new drugs claiming to serve particular racial populations enter the marketplace. Now that the (...)
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  24.  6
    Fiscal Decentralisation in Scandinavia: Denmark, Norway and Sweden.Jacob Wimpffen Braestrup & Stig Martin Nørgaard - 2003 - Journal des Economistes Et des Etudes Humaines 13 (4).
    The Scandinavian countries of Denmark, Norway, and Sweden are similar in many respects, not least with regards to the basic administrative set-up: a non-federal task-related division between state, counties and municipalities. In all three countries, counties and municipalities raise a large share of their own revenue, which is then supplemented by government grants. In addition, central government redistributes large amounts of locally collected revenue between the municipalities and the counties respectively, severely hampering local budgetary autonomy. Tax matters are generally centralised, (...)
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  25. Toward a Model of Self-Regulation.Elysa Koppelman & John F. Halpin - unknown
    In recent years, there has been much discussion over how to assure scientific integrity. It has become clear that a few scientists have fraudulently collected or reported data, conducted harmful or unethical experiments, or practiced “unscientific” procedure. What are regulative bodies to do? The approach has been to define research misconduct and then use that definition to assess scientific practice.[1] But just how to define research misconduct and hence, regulate the conduct of scientists in research? The debate that resulted in (...)
     
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  26.  53
    22 the Personal is Philosophical is Political: A Philosopher and Mother of a Cognitively Disabled Person Sends Notes From the Battlefield Eva Feder Kittay.Eva Feder Kittay - 2010 - In Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.), Cognitive Disability and its Challenge to Moral Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
  27.  14
    Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes in Staphylococcus aureus.Leukocidin Genes - 2003 - Emergence: Complexity and Organization 9:978-84.
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  28. The Best Introduction to the Mountains: Gene Wolfe on Tolkien.Gene Wolfe - 2005 - The Chesterton Review 31 (3/4):283-289.
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  29.  16
    Number, Form, Content: Hume's Dialogues, Number Nine: Gene Fendt.Gene Fendt - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (3):393-412.
    This paper's aim is threefold. First, I wish to show that there is an analogy in section nine that arises out of the interaction of the interlocutors; this analogy is, or has, a certain comic adequatic to the traditional arguments about proofs for the existence of God. Second, Philo's seemingly inconsequential example of the strange necessity of products of 9 in section nine is a perfected analogy of the broken arguments actually given in that section, destroying Philo's earlier arguments. Finally, (...)
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  30. Genes, Genesis, and God: Values and Their Origins in Natural and Human History.Holmes Rolston - 1999 - Cambridge University Press.
    Holmes Rolston challenges the sociobiological orthodoxy that would naturalize science, ethics, and religion. The book argues that genetic processes are not blind, selfish, and contingent, and that nature is therefore not value-free. The author examines the emergence of complex biodiversity through evolutionary history. Especially remarkable in this narrative is the genesis of human beings with their capacities for science, ethics, and religion. A major conceptual task of the book is to relate cultural genesis to natural genesis. There is also a (...)
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  31. What Genes Can't Do.Lenny Moss - 2002 - MIT Press.
    A historical and critical analysis of the concept of the gene that attempts to provide new perspectives and metaphors for the transformation of biology and its philosophy.
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  32. Commercii Epistolici Leibnitiani Typis Nondum Vulgati Selecta Specimina Ed. I.G.H. Feder.Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz & Johann Georg H. Feder - 1805
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  33. Genes in the Postgenomic Era.Paul E. Griffiths & Karola Stotz - 2006 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (6):499-521.
    We outline three very different concepts of the gene—instrumental, nominal, and postgenomic. The instrumental gene has a critical role in the construction and interpretation of experiments in which the relationship between genotype and phenotype is explored via hybridization between organisms or directly between nucleic acid molecules. It also plays an important theoretical role in the foundations of disciplines such as quantitative genetics and population genetics. The nominal gene is a critical practical tool, allowing stable communication between bioscientists (...)
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  34. Tolstoy and the Critics Literature and Aesthetics [by] Holley Gene Duffield [and] Manuel Bilsky. --.Holley Gene Duffield & Manuel Bilsky - 1965 - Scott, Foresman.
     
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  35. Genes and the Agents of Life: The Individual in the Fragile Sciences Biology.Robert A. Wilson - 2005 - New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    Genes and the Agents of Life undertakes to rethink the place of the individual in the biological sciences, drawing parallels with the cognitive and social sciences. Genes, organisms, and species are all agents of life but how are each of these conceptualized within genetics, developmental biology, evolutionary biology, and systematics? The 2005 book includes highly accessible discussions of genetic encoding, species and natural kinds, and pluralism above the levels of selection, drawing on work from across the biological sciences. The book (...)
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  36. Cohesion, Gene Flow, and the Nature of Species.Matthew J. Barker & Robert A. Wilson - 2010 - Journal of Philosophy 107 (2):59-77.
    A far-reaching and influential view in evolutionary biology claims that species are cohesive units held together by gene flow. Biologists have recognized empirical problems facing this view; after sharpening the expression of the view, we present novel conceptual problems for it. At the heart of these problems is a distinction between two importantly different concepts of cohesion, what we call integrative and response cohesion. Acknowledging the distinction problematizes both the explanandum of species cohesion and the explanans of gene (...)
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  37.  36
    Gene Editing, Identity and Benefit.Thomas Douglas & Katrien Devolder - 2022 - Philosophical Quarterly 72 (2):305-325.
    Some suggest that gene editing human embryos to prevent genetic disorders will be in one respect morally preferable to using genetic selection for the same purpose: gene editing will benefit particular future persons, while genetic selection would merely replace them. We first construct the most plausible defence of this suggestion—the benefit argument—and defend it against a possible objection. We then advance another objection: the benefit argument succeeds only when restricted to cases in which the gene-edited child would (...)
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  38. Gene-Juggling.Mary Midgley - 1979 - Philosophy 54 (210):439.
    Genes cannot be selfish or unselfish, any more than atoms can be jealous, elephants abstract or biscuits teleological. This should not need mentioning, but Richard Dawkins's book The Selfish Gene has succeeded in confusing a number of people about it, including Mr J. L. Mackie. What Mackie welcomes in Dawkins is a new, biological-looking kind of support for philosophic egoism. If this support came from Dawkins's producing important new facts, or good new interpretations of old facts, about animal life, (...)
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  39. Genes Made Molecular.C. Kenneth Waters - 1994 - Philosophy of Science 61 (2):163-185.
    This paper investigates what molecular biology has done for our understanding of the gene. I base a new account of the gene concept of classical genetics on the classical dogma that gene differences cause phenotypic differences. Although contemporary biologists often think of genes in terms of this concept, molecular biology provides a second way to understand genes. I clarify this second way by articulating a molecular gene concept. This concept unifies our understanding of the molecular basis (...)
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  40.  14
    Genes, Mind and Culture. [REVIEW]Alex Rosenberg - 1983 - Journal of Philosophy 80 (5):304-311.
  41.  12
    Gene Editing: How Can You Ask “Whether” If You Don't Know “How”?Bryan Cwik - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (3):13-17.
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  42.  96
    Germline Gene Editing and the Precautionary Principle.Julian J. Koplin, Christopher Gyngell & Julian Savulescu - 2020 - Bioethics 34 (1):49-59.
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  43. Gene Mobility and the Concept of Relatedness.Jonathan Birch - 2014 - Biology and Philosophy 29 (4):445-476.
    Cooperation is rife in the microbial world, yet our best current theories of the evolution of cooperation were developed with multicellular animals in mind. Hamilton’s theory of inclusive fitness is an important case in point: applying the theory in a microbial setting is far from straightforward, as social evolution in microbes has a number of distinctive features that the theory was never intended to capture. In this article, I focus on the conceptual challenges posed by the project of extending Hamilton’s (...)
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  44.  5
    Agape an Ethical Analysis.Gene H. Outka - 1972 - Yale University Press.
    This study is the most comprehensive account to date of modern treatments of the love commandment. Gene Outka examines the literature on _agape_ from Nygren’s _Agape and Eros_ in 1930. Both Roman Catholic and Protestant writings are considered, including those of D’Arcy, Niebuhr, Ramsey, Tillich, and above all, Karl Barth. The first seven chapters focus on the principal treatments in the theological literature as they relate to major topics in ethical theory. The last chapter explores further the basic normative (...)
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  45.  83
    Genes, Organisms, Populations: Controversies Over the Units of Selection.Robert N. Brandon & Richard M. Burian (eds.) - 1984 - Bradford.
    This anthology collects some of the most important papers on what is believed to be the major force in evolution, natural selection. An issue of great consequence in the philosophy of biology concerns the levels at which, and the units upon which selection acts. In recent years, biologists and philosophers have published a large number of papers bearing on this subject. The papers selected for inclusion in this book are divided into three main sections covering the history of the subject, (...)
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  46.  37
    Making Sense of Intersex: Changing Ethical Perspectives in Biomedicine.Ellen K. Feder - 2014 - Indiana University Press.
    Putting the ethical tools of philosophy to work, Ellen K. Feder seeks to clarify how we should understand "the problem" of intersex. Adults often report that medical interventions they underwent as children to "correct" atypical sex anatomies caused them physical and psychological harm. Proposing a philosophical framework for the treatment of children with intersex conditions—one that acknowledges the intertwined identities of parents, children, and their doctors—Feder presents a persuasive moral argument for collective responsibility to these children and their (...)
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  47. Disability, Gene Therapy and Eugenics - a Challenge to John Harris.S. M. Reindal - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (2):89 - 94.
    This article challenges the view of disability presented by Harris in his article, “Is gene therapy a form of eugenics?”1 It is argued that his definition of disability rests on an individual model of disability, where disability is regarded as a product of biological determinism or “personal tragedy” in the individual. Within disability theory this view is often called “the medical model” and it has been criticised for not being able to deal with the term “disability”, but only with (...)
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  48.  60
    Are Genes Units of Inheritance?Thomas Fogle - 1990 - Biology and Philosophy 5 (3):349-371.
    Definitions of the term gene typically superimpose molecular genetics onto Mendelism. What emerges are persistent attempts to regard the gene as a unit of structure and/or function, language that creates multiple meanings for the term and fails to acknowledge the diversity of gene architecture. I argue that coherence at the molecular level requires abandonment of the classical unit concept and recognition that a gene is constructed from an assemblage of domains. Hence, a domain set (1) conforms (...)
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  49. What Genes Can’T Do.Lenny Moss - 2003 - Journal of the History of Biology 38 (2):383-384.
     
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  50.  61
    Culture–Gene Coevolution, Norm-Psychology and the Emergence of Human Prosociality.Maciej Chudek & Joseph Henrich - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (5):218-226.
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