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Geert Gooskens
University of Antwerp
  1.  83
    The Ethical Status of Virtual Actions.Geert Gooskens - 2010 - Ethical Perspectives 17 (1):59-78.
    One of the most interesting features of the computer is its ability to create virtual environments. These environments allow us to interact with objects that are simulated by the computer and are not real. They thus allow us to realize actions that have no repercussions whatsoever on the non-virtual world. This seems to qualify virtual environments as an ideal playground to do all kinds of things that would be labelled ethically wrong if realized in the real world. Nevertheless, we have (...)
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  2. Where Am I? The Problem of Bilocation in Virtual Environments.Geert Gooskens - 2010 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 7 (3):13-24.
    In this paper, I deal with a striking phenomenon that often occurs when we explore the virtual environment of, for example, a video game. Suppose a friend sees me playing a video game and asks ‘Where are you?’ There are two possible answers to this question. I can either refer to my actual location (‘I am in my room’), but I can also refer to my location in the virtual world (‘I am in a space-ship’). Although my friend is probably (...)
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  3. Beyond Good and Evil? Morality in Video Games.Geert Gooskens - 2011 - Philosophical Writings (1):37-44.
  4. Das Jahrhundert des Zeugen?Geert Gooskens - 2011 - In Sibylle Schmidt, Sybille Krämer & Ramon Voges (eds.), Politik der Zeugenschaft: Zur Kritik Einer Wissenspraxis. Transcript. pp. 141-156.
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  5. Can Digital Pictures Qualify As Photographs?Geert Gooskens - 2012 - American Society for Aesthetics Graduate E-Journal 4 (1):17-23.
    Can digital pictures qualify as photographs? The commonsensical answer is that they can. We are happy to call a picture of a scene made with a digital camera a photograph. According to William Mitchell, however, we are wrong to do so. Pictures made with digital cameras would not qualify as photographs, because they lack a certain realism essential to classical, i.e. film-based, photography. In the following, I first present two ways in which film-based photographs are realistic . Next, I discuss (...)
     
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