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  1.  18
    Pharmaceutical Enhancement and Medical Professionals.Gavin G. Enck - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (1):23-28.
    Emerging data indicates the prevalence and increased use of pharmaceutical enhancements by young medical professionals. As pharmaceutical enhancements advance and become more readily available, it is imperative to consider their impact on medical professionals. If pharmaceutical enhancements augment a person’s neurological capacities to higher functioning levels, and in some situations having higher functioning levels of focus and concentration could improve patient care, then might medical professionals have a responsibility to enhance? In this paper, I suggest medical professionals may have a (...)
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  2. Ideals of Student Excellence and Enhancement.Gavin G. Enck - 2012 - Neuroethics 6 (1):155-164.
    Discussions about the permissibility of students using enhancements in education are often framed by the question, “Is a student who uses cognitive-enhancing drugs cheating?” While the question of cheating is interesting, it is but only one question concerning the permissibility of enhancement in education. Another interesting question is, “What kinds of students do we want in our academic institutions?” I suggest that one plausible answer to this question concerns the ideals of human excellence or virtues. The students we want in (...)
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  3. Healthcare Decisions Are Always Supported Decisions.Gavin G. Enck - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (11):29-32.
    Peterson, Karlawish, and Largent’s “Supported Decision Making with People at the Margins of Autonomy” not only elucidates the conceptual framework but also the practical importance of suppor...
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  4.  11
    Pharmaceutically Enhancing Medical Professionals for Difficult Conversations.Gavin G. Enck - 2013 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 23 (1):45-55.
    Conducting “difficult conversations” with patients and caregivers is one of the most difficult aspects of the medical profession. These conversations can involve communicating a terminal prognosis, advance care planning, or changing the goals of treatment. Although they are challenging, the need for these conversations is underwritten by the tenets of medical ethics. Unfortunately, medical professionals lack adequate training in communication skills and overestimate their abilities in conducting difficult conversations. I suggest that one way to improve that ability would be the (...)
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  5.  11
    Moving Beyond Concerns of Autonomy.Gavin G. Enck - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (4):26-28.
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  6.  13
    A Responsibility to Chemically Help Patients with Relationships and Love?Gavin G. Enck & Jeanna Ford - 2015 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 24 (4):493-496.
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  7.  5
    The Significance of the Distinction Between “Having a Life” Vs. “Being Alive” in End-of-Life Care.Gavin G. Enck - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (2):251-258.
    In end-of-life care discussions, I contend that the distinction between “having a life” vs. “being alive” is an underutilized distinction. This distinction is significant in separating different states of existence conflated by patients, families, and clinicians. In the clinical setting, applying this distinction in end-of-life care discussions aids patients’ and family members’ decision-making by helping them understand that being alive can differ from having a life. Moreover, this distinction helps them decide which state may be the most important to them. (...)
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  8.  54
    I Talked to a Genius and All I Got Was Knowledge.Gavin G. Enck - 2014 - Philosophia 42 (2):335-347.
    Bryan Frances’s recent argument is for the epistemic position called Live Skepticism. The Live Skepticism Argument (LSA) attempts to establish a restricted set of skeptical conclusions. The LSA’s “skeptical hypotheses” are scientific and philosophical positions that are “live actual possibilities” in an intellectual community. In order to “rule out” live hypotheses, an expert must know them to be false. However, since these are live hypotheses in this expert’s intellectual community—endorsed by others who have parallel levels of knowledge, intelligence, and understanding—this (...)
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  9.  15
    Mental Integrity and Intentional Side Effects.Gavin G. Enck & Anne L. Saunders - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 9 (3):166-168.
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  10.  8
    Neurosurgery for Pediatric Psychopaths.Gavin G. Enck - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 7 (3):170-171.
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