Results for 'Gail Mccutcheon'

950 found
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  1.  15
    Book Review Section 2. [REVIEW]J. J. Chambliss, Hernan Vera, Philip G. Altbach, Deane Neubauer, Gail Mccutcheon, Michael W. Apple, Edward W. Stevens Jr & Gail Paulus Sorenson - 1988 - Educational Studies 19 (1):81-118.
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  2.  14
    Book Review Section 2. [REVIEW]J. J. Chambliss, Hernan Vera, Philip G. Altbach, Deane Neubauer, Gail Mccutcheon, Michael W. Apple, Edward W. Stevens Jr & Gail Paulus Sorenson - 1988 - Educational Studies: A Jrnl of the American Educ. Studies Assoc 19 (1):81-118.
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  3. Interview with Professor Gail Weiss.Gail Weiss, Luna Dolezal & Sheena Hyland - 2008 - Perspectives: International Postgraduate Journal of Philosophy 1 (1):3-8.
    An interview with Gail Weiss concerning her interests and influences, especially the body and embodiment.
     
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  4.  2
    Manufacturing Religion: The Discourse on Sui Generis Religion and the Politics of Nostalgia.Russell T. McCutcheon - 1997 - Oxford University Press USA.
    In this new book, author Russell McCutcheon offers a powerful critique of traditional scholarship on religion, focusing on multiple interrelated targets. Most prominent among these are the History of Religions as a discipline; Mircea Eliade, one of the founders of the modern discipline; recent scholarship on Eliade's life and politics; contemporary textbooks on world religions; and the oft-repeated bromide that "religion" is a sui generis phenomenon. McCutcheon skillfully analyzes the ideological basis for and service of the sui generis (...)
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  5.  8
    Thought in Action: Expertise and the Conscious Mind.Barbara Gail Montero - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    How does thinking affect doing? There is a widely held view that thinking about what you are doing, as you are doing it, hinders performance. Once you have acquired the ability to putt a golf ball, play an arpeggio on the piano, or parallel-park, reflecting on your actions leads to inaccuracies, blunders, and sometimes even utter paralysis--that's what is widely believed. But is it true? After exploring some of the contemporary and historical manifestations of the idea, Barbara Gail Montero (...)
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  6. Trusting Artificial Intelligence in Cybersecurity is a Double-Edged Sword.Mariarosaria Taddeo, Tom McCutcheon & Luciano Floridi - 2019 - Philosophy and Technology 32:1-15.
    Applications of artificial intelligence (AI) for cybersecurity tasks are attracting greater attention from the private and the public sectors. Estimates indicate that the market for AI in cybersecurity will grow from US$1 billion in 2016 to a US$34.8 billion net worth by 2025. The latest national cybersecurity and defence strategies of several governments explicitly mention AI capabilities. At the same time, initiatives to define new standards and certification procedures to elicit users’ trust in AI are emerging on a global scale. (...)
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  7. The Double Life of Names.Gail Leckie - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 165 (3):1139-1160.
    This paper is a counter to the view that names are always predicates with the same extension as a metalinguistic predicate with the form “is a thing called “N”” (the Predicate View). The Predicate View is in opposition to the Referential View of names. In this paper, I undermine one argument for the Predicate View. The Predicate View’s adherents take examples of uses of names that have the surface appearance of a predicate and generalise from these to treat uses of (...)
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  8.  86
    The Possibility of Inquiry: Meno’s Paradox From Socrates to Sextus.Gail Fine - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Meno's Paradox from Socrates to Sextus Gail Fine. sense that they consider the issues it raises; and they argue, against its conclusion, that inquiry is possible. Like Plato and Aristotle, they also explain what makes inquiry possible; and they do ...
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  9. Relational Knowing and Epistemic Injustice: Toward a Theory of Willful Hermeneutical Ignorance.Gaile Pohlhaus - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (4):715-735.
    I distinguish between two senses in which feminists have argued that the knower is social: 1. situated or socially positioned and 2. interdependent. I argue that these two aspects of the knower work in cooperation with each other in a way that can produce willful hermeneutical ignorance, a type of epistemic injustice absent from Miranda Fricker's Epistemic Injustice. Analyzing the limitations of Fricker's analysis of the trial of Tom Robinson in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird with attention to the (...)
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  10. Private/Public Interest and the Enforcement of a Code of Professional Conduct.James Fisher, Sally Gunz & John McCutcheon - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 31 (3):191 - 207.
    There has been considerable interest in the literature about how professions operate in both the private and public interest. This paper examines this issue in the context of the enforcement of the professional code of conduct of a particular professional accounting association. The paper explores whether certain enforcement actions of the association suggest behaviour motivated at least partially by private interest. It then considers whether the consequences of such behaviour or practices are troubling.
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  11. The Theaetetus of Plato.Gail Fine - 1990 - Philosophical Review 101 (4):830-834.
    M. J. Levett's elegant translation of Plato's _Theaetetus_, first published in 1928, is here revised by Myles Burnyeat to reflect contemporary standards of accuracy while retaining the style, imagery, and idiomatic speech for which the Levett translation is unparalleled. Bernard William’s concise introduction, aimed at undergraduate students, illuminates the powerful argument of this complex dialogue, and illustrates its connections to contemporary metaphysical and epistemological concerns.
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  12. Plato on Knowledge and Forms: Selected Essays.Gail Fine - 2003 - Oxford University Press.
    Plato on Knowledge and Forms brings together a set of connected essays by Gail Fine, in her main area of research since the late 1970s: Plato's metaphysics and epistemology. She discusses central issues in Plato's metaphysics and epistemology, issues concerning the nature and extent of knowledge, and its relation to perception, sensibles, and forms; and issues concerning the nature of forms, such as whether they are universals or particulars, separate or immanent, and whether they are causes. A specially written (...)
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  13.  24
    Inference During Reading.Gail McKoon & Roger Ratcliff - 1992 - Psychological Review 99 (3):440-466.
  14.  28
    Refiguring the Ordinary.Gail Weiss (ed.) - 2008 - Indiana University Press.
    If social, political, and material transformation is to have a lasting impact on individuals and society, it must be integrated within ordinary experience. Refiguring the Ordinary examines the ways in which individuals' bodies, habits, environments, and abilities function as horizons that underpin their understandings of the ordinary. These features of experience, according to Gail Weiss, are never neutral, but are always affected by gender, race, social class, ethnicity, nationality, and perceptions of bodily normality. While no two people will experience (...)
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  15.  11
    Animal Research Nexus: A New Approach to the Connections Between Science, Health and Animal Welfare.Gail Davies, Richard Gorman, Beth Greenhough, Pru Hobson-West, Robert G. W. Kirk, Reuben Message, Dmitriy Myelnikov, Alexandra Palmer, Emma Roe, Vanessa Ashall, Bentley Crudgington, Renelle McGlacken, Sara Peres & Tess Skidmore - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (4):499-511.
    Animals used in biological research and testing have become integrated into the trajectories of modern biomedicine, generating increased expectations for and connections between human and animal health. Animal research also remains controversial and its acceptability is contingent on a complex network of relations and assurances across science and society, which are both formally constituted through law and informal or assumed. In this paper, we propose these entanglements can be studied through an approach that understands animal research as a nexus spanning (...)
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  16. On Ideas: Aristotle’s Criticism of Plato’s Theory of Forms.Gail Fine - 1993 - Oxford University Press.
    The Peri ide^on is the only work in which Aristotle systematically sets out and criticizes arguments for the existence of Platonic forms. Gail Fine presents the first full-length treatment in English of this important but neglected work. She asks how, and how well, Aristotle understands Plato's theory of forms, and why and with what justification he favors an alternative metaphysical scheme. She examines the significance of the Peri ide^on for some central questions about Plato's theory of forms--whether, for example, (...)
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  17.  4
    Data Shadows: Knowledge, Openness, and Absence.Gail Davies, Brian Rappert & Sabina Leonelli - 2017 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 42 (2):191-202.
    This editorial critically engages with the understanding of openness by attending to how notions of presence and absence come bundled together as part of efforts to make open. This is particularly evident in contemporary discourse around data production, dissemination, and use. We highlight how the preoccupations with making data present can be usefully analyzed and understood by tracing the related concerns around what is missing, unavailable, or invisible, which unvaryingly but often implicitly accompany debates about data and openness.
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  18. The Other as Alter Ego: A Genetic Approach.Gail Soffer - 1998 - Husserl Studies 15 (3):151-166.
    It is an ancient view, to be found even in Aristotle’s analysis of friendship, that the other is an alter ego, another myself. More recently, this conception has provoked spirited debate within and without the phenomenological tradition. It can be found in a wide variety of texts, from Husserl’s Cartesian Meditations to Thomas Nagel’s “What is it like to be a bat?” The basic position can be summarized as follows. Intentional experiences are subjective, first-person experiences, not objective, third-person experiences.
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  19.  3
    Questions of Presence.Gail Lewis - 2017 - Feminist Review 117 (1):1-19.
    This article considers some of the ways in which ‘the black woman’ as both representation and embodied, sentient being is rendered visible and invisible, and to link these to the multiple and competing ways in which she is ‘present’. The issues are engaged through three distinct but overlapping conceptualisations of ‘presence’. ‘Presence’ as conceived in performance studies; ‘presence’ as conceived and worked with in psychoanalysis; and ‘presence’ as decolonising political praxis among Indigenous communities. I use these conceptualisations of presence to (...)
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  20.  2
    Chuck McCutcheon. Nuclear Reactions: The Politics of Opening a Radioactive Waste Disposal Site. Xi+231 Pp., Illus., Index. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2002. $24.95. [REVIEW]Sharon Ghamari‐Tabrizi - 2003 - Isis 94 (4):783-784.
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  21. Descartes and Ancient Skepticism: Reheated Cabbage?Gail Fine - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (2):195-234.
    Lately, several commentators have argued that there are significant differences between ancient and modern skepticism. For example, it has been argued that ancient skeptics disavow belief, whereas the moderns disavow only knowledge. It has also been argued that the scope of ancient skepticism is considerably less radical than that of modern skepticism: unlike the moderns, the ancients do not question whether they have bodies or whether there is an external world furnished with the sorts of objects we generally take there (...)
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  22.  31
    A Case of Precision Timing in Ordinary Conversation: Overlapped Tag-Positioned Address Terms in Closing Sequences.Gail Jefferson - 1973 - Semiotica 9 (1).
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  23.  40
    Telling Flesh: The Substance of the Corporeal. Vicki Kirby. New York: Routledge, 1997.Gail Weiss - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (4):244-247.
    In Telling Flesh, Vicki Kirby addresses a major theoretical issue at the intersection of the social sciences and feminist theory -- the separation of nature from culture. Kirby focuses particularly on postmodern approaches to corporeality, and explores how these approaches confine the body within questions about meaning and interpretation. Kirby explores the implications of this containment in the work of Jane Gallop, Judith Butler, and Drucilla Cornell, as well as in recent cyber-criticism. By analysing the inadvertent repetition of the nature/culture (...)
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  24. The Normal, the Natural, and the Normative: A Merleau-Pontian Legacy to Feminist Theory, Critical Race Theory, and Disability Studies.Gail Weiss - 2015 - Continental Philosophy Review 48 (1):77-93.
    This essay argues that Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology of embodiment can be an extremely helpful ally for contemporary feminist theorists, critical race theorists, and disability studies scholars because his work suggests that the gender, race, and ability of bodies are not innate or fixed features of those bodies, much less corporeal indicators of physical, social, psychic, and even moral inferiority, but are themselves dynamic phenomena that have the potential to overturn accepted notions of normalcy, naturalness, and normativity. Taking seriously Merleau-Ponty’s insistence that (...)
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  25.  3
    What is a Humanized Mouse? Remaking the Species and Spaces of Translational Medicine.Gail Davies - 2012 - Body and Society 18 (3-4):126-155.
    This article explores the development of a novel biomedical research organism, and its potential to remake the species and spaces of translational medicine. The humanized mouse is a complex experimental object in which mice, rendered immunodeficient through genetic alteration, are engrafted with human stem cells in the hope of reconstituting a human immune system for biomedical research and drug testing. These chimeric organisms have yet to garner the same commentary from social scientists as other human–animal hybrid forms. Yet, they are (...)
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  26. Varieties of Epistemic Injustice.Gaile Pohlhaus - 2017 - In Ian James Kidd, Gaile Pohlhaus & José Médina Médina (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Epistemic Injustice.
  27.  3
    Childhood and Postcolonization: Power, Education, and Contemporary Practice.Gaile Sloan Cannella & Radhika Viruru - 2004 - Routledge.
    This book opens the door to the effects of intellectual, educational, and economic colonization of young children throughout the world. Using a postcolonial lens on current educational practices, the authors hope to lift those practices out of reproducing traditional power structures and push our thinking beyond the adult/child dichotomy into new possibilities for the lives that are created with children.
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  28.  69
    Substance and Separation in Aristotle.Gail Fine & Lynne Spellman - 1996 - Philosophical Review 105 (4):527.
    Spellman argues that Aristotle developed his views about substance in response to Plato’s theory of forms. In particular, she argues that Aristotelian substances are as much like Platonic forms as possible, minus the latter’s separation. Whether ASs are like PFs depends, of course, not only on what one takes ASs to be like, but also on what one takes PFs to be like; accordingly, Spellman provides accounts of both. She argues that ASs are what she calls specimens of natural kinds. (...)
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  29.  4
    The Politics of Youth in Greek Tragedy: Gangs of Athens by Matthew Shipton.Bonnie Rock-McCutcheon - 2019 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 112 (3):236-237.
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  30.  48
    The Challenge of Informed Consent and Return of Results in Translational Genomics: Empirical Analysis and Recommendations.Gail E. Henderson, Susan M. Wolf, Kristine J. Kuczynski, Steven Joffe, Richard R. Sharp, D. Williams Parsons, Bartha M. Knoppers, Joon-Ho Yu & Paul S. Appelbaum - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (3):344-355.
    Large-scale sequencing tests, including whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing, are rapidly moving into clinical use. Sequencing is already being used clinically to identify therapeutic opportunities for cancer patients who have run out of conventional treatment options, to help diagnose children with puzzling neurodevelopmental conditions, and to clarify appropriate drug choices and dosing in individuals. To evaluate and support clinical applications of these technologies, the National Human Genome Research Institute and National Cancer Institute have funded studies on clinical and research sequencing under (...)
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  31. In Favor of Logarithmic Scoring.Randall G. McCutcheon - 2019 - Philosophy of Science 86 (2):286-303.
    Shuford, Albert and Massengill proved, a half century ago, that the logarithmic scoring rule is the only proper measure of inaccuracy determined by a differentiable function of probability assigned the actual cell of a scored partition. In spite of this, the log rule has gained less traction in applied disciplines and among formal epistemologists that one might expect. In this paper we show that the differentiability criterion in the Shuford et. al. result is unnecessary and use the resulting simplified characterization (...)
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  32.  19
    Descartes and Ancient Skepticism: Reheated Cabbage?Gail Fine - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (2):195.
    Lately, several commentators have argued that there are significant differences between ancient and modern skepticism. For example, it has been argued that ancient skeptics disavow belief, whereas the moderns disavow only knowledge. It has also been argued that the scope of ancient skepticism is considerably less radical than that of modern skepticism: unlike the moderns, the ancients do not question whether they have bodies or whether there is an external world furnished with the sorts of objects we generally take there (...)
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  33.  41
    Notes on 'Latency' in Overlap Onset.Gail Jefferson - 1986 - Human Studies 9 (2-3):153 - 183.
  34. Fifty Concepts for a Critical Phenomenology.Gail Weiss, Ann V. Murphy & Gayle Salamon (eds.) - 2019 - Nothwestern University Press.
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  35.  4
    Mill and Sexual Equality.Gail Tulloch - 1989 - Lynne Rienner Pub.
    Lecturer in social foundations of education and women's studies, Victoria College, Australia.
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  36. Individual Differences in the Association Between Celebrity Worship and Subjective Well-Being: The Moderating Role of Gender and Age.Ágnes Zsila, Gábor Orosz, Lynn E. McCutcheon & Zsolt Demetrovics - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    The association of celebrity worship with mental health concerns has been extensively studied in the past two decades. However, there is a lack of research on basic demographic characteristics that can potentially alter the link between celebrity admiration and different aspects of mental health. The present study investigates the possible moderating role of gender, age, and opposite/same-gender celebrity selection on the association of celebrity worship with general well-being, self-esteem and perceived daytime sleepiness. A total of 1763 Hungarian adults completed an (...)
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  37.  14
    Mobilizing Experimental Life: Spaces of Becoming with Mutant Mice.Gail Davies - 2013 - Theory, Culture and Society 30 (7-8):129-153.
    This paper uses the figure of the inbred laboratory mouse to reflect upon the management and mobilization of biological difference in the contemporary biosciences. Working through the concept of shifting experimental systems, the paper seeks to connect practices concerned with standardization and control in contemporary research with the emergent and stochastic qualities of biological life. Specifically, it reviews the importance of historical narratives of standardization in experimental systems based around model organisms, before identifying a tension in contemporary accounts of the (...)
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  38.  95
    Neural-Network Models of Learning and Memory: Leading Questions and an Emerging Framework.Gail A. Carpenter - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (3):114-118.
  39. Armstrong on Relational and Nonrelational Realism.Gail Fine - 1981 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 62 (3):262-71.
    This paper considers and criticizes david armstrong's defense in his book of an allegedly nonrelational version of realism, "universals and scientific realism". It also challenges his claim that plato, But not aristotle, Held a relational version of realism.
     
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  40.  24
    Returning Genetic Research Results to Individuals: Points‐to‐Consider.Gaile Renegar, Christopher J. Webster, Steffen Stuerzebecher, Lea Harty, Susan E. Ide, Beth Balkite, Taryn A. Rogalski‐Salter, Nadine Cohen, Brian B. Spear & Diane M. Barnes - 2006 - Bioethics 20 (1):24-36.
  41.  9
    A Note on Verisimilitude and Accuracy.Randall McCutcheon - forthcoming - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.
  42.  86
    Gaslighting and Echoing, or Why Collective Epistemic Resistance is Not a “Witch Hunt”.Gaile Pohlhaus - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (4):674-686.
    This essay reflects on some of the problems with characterizing collective epistemic resistance to oppression as “unthinking” or antithetical to reason by highlighting the epistemic labor involved in contending with and resisting epistemic oppression. To do so, I develop a structural notion of epistemic gaslighting in order to highlight structural features of contexts within which collective epistemic resistance to oppression occurs. I consider two different forms of epistemic echoing as modes of contending with and resisting epistemic oppression that are sometimes (...)
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  43.  20
    Sexual Difference as Model: An Ethics for the Global Future.Gail M. Schwab - 1998 - Diacritics 28 (1):76-92.
  44. Separation.Gail Fine - 1984 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 2:31-87.
  45.  54
    Phenomenology and Scientific Realism: Husserl's Critique of Galileo.Gail Soffer - 1990 - Review of Metaphysics 44 (1):67 - 94.
    ACCORDING TO HUSSERL, THE REVOLUTION brought about by the new mathematical science of the seventeenth century was primarily an ontological one: a shift in the conception of the real. That Husserl opposes the new Galilean-Cartesian ontology is clear. This much is evident from the potent rhetoric of the Crisis declaiming Galileo as an "entdeckender und verdeckender Genius", forgetful of the lifeworld, failing to grasp what the mathematical-empirical method he brought to such a degree of perfection actually achieves. Indeed, even without (...)
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  46. Revisiting the Myth: Husserl and Sellars on the Given.Gail Soffer - 2003 - Review of Metaphysics 57 (2):301-337.
    IN SCIENCE, PERCEPTION, AND REALITY, Sellars marvels at the power of fashion in philosophy, which all too often offers us the spectacle of a stampede rather than a careful sifting of gold from dross. Sellars was worried that the flight from phenomenalism would lead to the familiar pendulum effect and so thwart his effort to “usher analytic philosophy out of its Humean and into its Kantian stage,” as Rorty has put it. Accordingly, Sellars’s critique of the Myth of the Given (...)
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  47. Skepticism, Relevant Alternatives, and Deductive Closure.Gail Stine - 1999 - In Keith DeRose & Ted A. Warfield (eds.), Skepticism: A Contemporary Reader. Oup Usa.
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  48.  54
    [Book Review] Reinventing Revolution, New Social Movements and the Socialist Tradition in India. [REVIEW]Gail Omvedt - 2000 - Feminist Studies 26 (3):645-660.
  49.  31
    Ethics of Treatment Interruption Trials in HIV Cure Research: Addressing the Conundrum of Risk/Benefit Assessment.Gail E. Henderson, Holly L. Peay, Eugene Kroon, Rosemary Jean Cadigan, Karen Meagher, Thidarat Jupimai, Adam Gilbertson, Jill Fisher, Nuchanart Q. Ormsby, Nitiya Chomchey, Nittaya Phanuphak, Jintanat Ananworanich & Stuart Rennie - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2017-104433.
    Though antiretroviral therapy is the standard of care for people living with HIV, its treatment limitations, burdens, stigma and costs lead to continued interest in HIV cure research. Early-phase cure trials, particularly those that include analytic treatment interruption, involve uncertain and potentially high risk, with minimal chance of clinical benefit. Some question whether such trials should be offered, given the risk/benefit imbalance, and whether those who choose to participate are acting rationally. We address these questions through a longitudinal decision-making study (...)
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  50.  1
    Transformations: Thinking After Heidegger.Gail Stenstad - 2006 - University of Wisconsin Press.
    How are we to think and act constructively in the face of today’s environmental and political catastrophes? Gail Stenstad finds inspiring answers in the thought of German philosopher Martin Heidegger. Rather than simply describing or explaining Heidegger’s transformative way of thinking, Stenstad’s writing enacts it, bringing new insight into contemporary environmental, political, and personal issues. Readers come to understand some of Heidegger’s most challenging concepts through experiencing them. This is a truly creative scholarly work that invites all readers to (...)
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