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  1. Pride, shame, and guilt: emotions of self-assessment.Gabriele Taylor - 1985 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    This discussion of pride, shame, and guilt centers on the beliefs involved in the experience of any of these emotions. Through a detailed study, the author demonstrates how these beliefs are alike--in that they are all directed towards the self--and how they differ. The experience of these three emotions are illustrated by examples taken from English literature. These concrete cases supply a context for study and indicate the complexity of the situations in which these emotions usually occur.
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  2.  64
    Pride Shame and Guilt.Gabriele Taylor - 1989 - Noûs 23 (2):253-254.
  3. Deadly vices.Gabriele Taylor - 2006 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Gabriele Taylor presents a philosophical investigation of the "ordinary" vices traditionally seen as "death to the soul": sloth, envy, avarice, pride, anger, lust, and gluttony. In the course of a richly detailed discussion of individual and interrelated vices, which complements recent work by moral philosophers on virtue, she shows why these "deadly sins" are correctly so named and grouped together.
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  4. Integrity.Gabriele Taylor & Raimond Gaita - 1981 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 55 (1):143 - 176.
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  5. Love.Gabriele Taylor - 1976 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 76:147 - 164.
    Gabriele Taylor; VIII*—Love, Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Volume 76, Issue 1, 1 June 1976, Pages 147–164, https://doi.org/10.1093/aristotelian/76.1.
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  6.  18
    Integrity.Gabriele Taylor & Raimond Gaita - 1981 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 55 (1):143-176.
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  7. Envy and Jealousy: Emotions and Vices.Gabriele Taylor - 1988 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 13 (1):233-249.
  8.  43
    VIII*—Love.Gabriele Taylor - 1976 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 76 (1):147-164.
    Gabriele Taylor; VIII*—Love, Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Volume 76, Issue 1, 1 June 1976, Pages 147–164, https://doi.org/10.1093/aristotelian/76.1.
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  9.  13
    Cambridge and Vienna: Frank P. Ramsey and the Vienna Circle.Gabriele Taylor, Brian Mcguinness, Sir Michael Dummett, Patrick Suppes, Brian Skyrms & Stathis Psillos - 2006 - Springer Verlag.
    The Institute Vienna Circle held a conference in Vienna in 2003, Cambridge and Vienna – Frank P. Ramsey and the Vienna Circle, to commemorate the philosophical and scientific work of Frank Plumpton Ramsey (1903–1930). This Ramsey conference provided not only historical and biographical perspectives on one of the most gifted thinkers of the Twentieth Century, but also new impulses for further research on at least some of the topics pioneered by Ramsey, whose interest and potential are greater than ever. Ramsey (...)
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  10.  94
    The self-regarding and other-regarding virtues.Gabriele Taylor & Sybil Wolfram - 1968 - Philosophical Quarterly 18 (72):238-248.
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  11. Moral action, a phenomenological study.Robert Sokolowski, Richard Norman & Gabriele Taylor - 1985 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 177 (2):224-227.
     
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  12.  30
    Frank Ramsey: A Biographical Sketch.Gabriele Taylor - 2006 - Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 12:1-18.
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  13.  49
    Hume's views of moral judgments.Gabriele Taylor - 1971 - Philosophical Quarterly 21 (82):64-68.
  14. Berkeley's Principles of Human Knowledge Critical Studies.Gale W. Engle & Gabriele Taylor - 1968 - Wadsworth.
  15. Capital Vices.Gabriele Taylor - 2006 - In Deadly vices. New York: Oxford University Press.
    The characterization of the vices as ‘deadly’ has been explained in terms of the fatal harm they bring to those who possess them. Little has as yet been said about their effect on others, though there have been indications that at least potentially, they are likely to be harmful to others as well. A question is raised on whether the disposition of the vicious is such that by possessing a particular vice, they have further vicious tendencies as well.
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  16. Countervailing Virtues.Gabriele Taylor - 2006 - In Deadly vices. New York: Oxford University Press.
    The vicious are self-destructive in their attitude towards themselves. A countervailing virtue should then be, in some way, a good to that self; where the vices destroy and corrupt, a countervailing virtue should heal and hold the self together. Such ‘self-healing’ virtues are not necessarily what might be regarded as strictly ‘moral’ virtues, which require some form of altruistic motivation. A self-healing virtue offers the agent a manner of escape from the burden of his or her self, which provides him (...)
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  17. Deadly Sins.Gabriele Taylor - 2006 - In Deadly vices. New York: Oxford University Press.
    This chapter explores the particular vice of acedia or sloth. Sloth is a paralyzing vice, with the slothful carrying the burden of a useless self. Awareness of this condition explains occurrent moods of indolence, hopelessness, and despair. If, like Oblomov, they manage nonetheless to achieve a relatively contented state of mind then this is because they have found some mental busyness and are given to idle daydreams, which may, at least for periods of time, conceal their burden from themselves.
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  18. Envy and Covetousness.Gabriele Taylor - 2006 - In Deadly vices. New York: Oxford University Press.
    This chapter focuses on the miserly avaricious. It is argued that the miserly avaricious defeat their own purposes. The possession of money, which is supposed to be of such value to them does, on the contrary, lead to frustration. They live in a shrinking world and lose control over their lives, for they are at the mercy of their dominating desire. In all its forms, vicious envy spoils the good it covets. In this, as in other respects, the structural features (...)
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  19.  20
    Heidegger und die Tradition.Gabriele Taylor & Werner Marx - 1963 - Philosophical Quarterly 13 (52):271.
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  20. Hume's Views of Moral Judgements'. Tweyman, S.Gabriele Taylor - 1995 - In Stanley Tweyman (ed.), David Hume: Critical Assessments. Routledge. pp. 110--115.
     
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  21. Interconnections.Gabriele Taylor - 2006 - In Deadly vices. New York: Oxford University Press.
    The structural similarities between the different vices means that there will be overlaps between them, or that those in the grip of one of these vices should also naturally be exposed to another. One example is the relation between resentment and envy. The resentful and the envious share feelings of impotence and of hostility towards others. These are miserable feelings, and suffering them will reinforce both their sense of failure and their vengeful attitude towards the world. The avaricious, envious, proud, (...)
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  22. Introduction: Vices and Virtue‐Theory.Gabriele Taylor - 2006 - In Deadly vices. New York: Oxford University Press.
    This introductory chapter begins with a discussion of the vices considered in this essay, namely, sloth, envy, avarice, pride, anger, lust, and gluttony. It argues that these so-called ‘deadly sins’ were correctly named and correctly classed together. Irrespective of their theological background, they are similar in structure in that the agent’s thoughts and desires, while differing in content depending on the vice in question, focus primarily on the self and its position in the world. They are similar also in that (...)
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  23.  96
    Mill, Punishment and the Self-regarding Failings.Gabriele Taylor & Sybil Wolfram - 1968 - Analysis 28 (5):168 - 172.
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  24.  14
    Mill, punishment and the self-regarding failings.Gabriele Taylor & Alonso Church - 1968 - Analysis 28 (5):168-172.
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  25. Pride and Anger.Gabriele Taylor - 2006 - In Deadly vices. New York: Oxford University Press.
    Pride is vice which most patently involves consciousness of self and self-evaluation. The assessment of its nature and implicit harm will depend on the features of the self set out in the preceding chapter. There are different types of pride and, as in the case of envy, not all of them are corruptive.
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  26. Self and Self‐Consciousness.Gabriele Taylor - 2006 - In Deadly vices. New York: Oxford University Press.
    This chapter explores the nature of self and self-consciousness. The self is that which gives a person her identity as she herself sees it, and that means that she has sufficient complexity to be able to form intentions, to evaluate and select. Self-consciousness is itself constitutive of the self, and constituent of the self are consequently evaluations and decisions about what it is worthwhile to do and what to avoid, about the sort of life one wants to lead, and the (...)
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  27.  86
    Virtues and Passions.Gabriele Taylor & Sybil Wolfram - 1971 - Analysis 31 (3):76 - 83.
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  28.  10
    Virtues and passions.Gabriele Taylor & Alonso Church - 1971 - Analysis 31 (3):76-83.
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  29.  61
    Vices and the Self.Gabriele Taylor - 1994 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 37:145-.
    I am interested in those vices which appear on lists of ‘deadly sins’, not from any theological point of view but because of the insight revealed in their selection as being ‘death to the soul’, which I understand as ‘corruptive of the self’. ‘Corruption’ is here to be taken in a literal sense as ‘destruction or dissolution of the constitution of a thing which makes that thing what it is’. Such corruption is to be found in the structure of the (...)
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  30. Vices. Deadly vices?Gabriele Taylor - 1996 - In Roger Crisp (ed.), How Should One Live?: Essays on the Virtues. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
     
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  31.  23
    Emotions and Reasons: An Inquiry into Emotional Justification, by Patricia S. Greenspan. [REVIEW]Gabriele Taylor - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (3):716-719.
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  32.  43
    Emotions and Reasons: An Inquiry into Emotional Justification, by Patricia S. Greenspan. [REVIEW]Gabriele Taylor - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (3):716-719.