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  1.  27
    Should research ethics committees be told how to think?G. M. Sayers - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (1):39-42.
    Research ethics committees are charged with providing an opinion on whether research proposals are ethical. These committees are overseen by a central office that acts for the Department of Health and hence the State. An advisory group has recently reported back to the Department of Health, recommending that it should deal with inconsistency in the decisions made by different RECs. This article questions the desirability and feasibility of questing for consistent ethical decisions.
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  2. An analysis of CPR decision-making by elderly patients.G. M. Sayers, I. Schofield & M. Aziz - 1997 - Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (4):207-212.
    Traditionally clinicians have determined their patients' resuscitation status without consultation. This has been condemned as morally indefensible in cases where not for resuscitation (NFR) orders are based on quality of life considerations and when the patient's true wishes are not known. Such instances would encompass most resuscitation decisions in elderly patients. Having previously involved patients in CPR decision-making, we chose formally to explore the reasons behind the choices made. Although the patients were not upset, and readily decided at the time (...)
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  3.  85
    Psychiatry and the control of dangerousness: a comment.G. M. Sayers - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (4):235-236.
    The paper by Szasz is about mental illness and its meaning, and like Procrustes, who altered hapless travellers to fit his bed, Szasz changes the meanings of words and concepts to suit his themes.1 Refuting the existence of “mental illness”, he suggests that the term functions in an apotropaic sense. He submits that in this sense it is used to avert danger, protect society, and hence justify preventive detention of “dangerous” people.But his arguments misrepresent the precise meaning of the term (...)
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  4.  30
    The value of taking an 'ethics history'.G. M. Sayers - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (2):114-117.
    Objectives—To study the value of taking an ethics history as a means of assessing patients' preferences for decision making and for their relatives' involvement.Design—Questionnaire administered by six junior doctors to 56 mentally competent patients, admitted into general and geriatric medical beds.Setting—A large district general hospital in the United Kingdom.Main measures—To establish whether patients were adequately informed about their illness and whether they minded the information being communicated to their relatives. To establish their preference regarding truthful disclosure and participation in decision (...)
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  5.  54
    Withholding life prolonging treatment, and self deception.G. M. Sayers - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (6):347-352.
    Objectives: To compare non-treatment decision making by general practitioners and geriatricians in response to vignettes. To see whether the doctors’ decisions were informed by ethical or legal reasoning.Design: Qualitative study in which consultant geriatricians and general practitioners randomly selected from a list of local practitioners were interviewed. The doctors were asked whether patients described in five vignettes should be admitted to hospital for further care, and to give supporting reasons. They were asked with whom they would consult, who they believed (...)
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  6.  17
    “Stepford doctors”: an allegory.G. M. Sayers - 2006 - Medical Humanities 32 (1):57-58.
    The Stepford Wives, a novel by Ira Levin, provides the theme for this allegory. The men of Stepford belong to the Men’s Association. Their wives are “perfect”, in that they do nothing other than clean, cook, preen, and provide satisfaction without argument for their husbands. They are, furthermore, content with their lot, and believe that their previous interests and freedoms were self indulgent. Levin never informs his readers how the men came to obtain total mastery over their “Stepford wives”, although (...)
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  7.  17
    Surrogates’ Decisions Regarding CPR, and the Fallacy of Substituted Judgment.G. M. Sayers, N. Beckett, H. Waters & C. Turner - 2004 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 15 (4):334-345.
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