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  1.  32
    The Coming World Transformation. [REVIEW]D. D. G. - 1964 - Review of Metaphysics 17 (3):478-479.
    This book seems to be three things: a series of predictions, both major and minor, concerning economic, political and social changes during the next hundred years or so; a sustained argument in favor of the welfare state; a discussion of "prognostics" as a needed and possible quasi-science.--G. D. D.
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  2.  21
    Thinking and Doing. [REVIEW]D. D. G. - 1977 - Review of Metaphysics 31 (2):313-314.
    The author’s purpose is to search out patterns of the world and the various manifestations of experience. How he sets out to do this is to develop a "network of theories about the most fundamental aspects of critical thinking." What this entails is a highly technical approach that requires the reader to have a firm grasp of formal logic. Castañeda, however, does present his theories and principles in a way that the reader is not overwhelmed with symbolic notation. The author, (...)
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  3.  25
    Religion From Tolstoy to Camus. [REVIEW]D. D. G. - 1964 - Review of Metaphysics 17 (3):478-478.
    An anthology containing short selections from diverse thinkers since 1880. The selections are almost uniformly relevant and lucid. The thesis are controversial, and together represent almost every point on the philosophic spectrum. Kaufmann's introduction includes a neatly argued re-evaluation of Tolstoy's late tracts.--G. D. D.
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  4.  21
    The Heaven of Invention. [REVIEW]D. D. G. - 1964 - Review of Metaphysics 17 (3):474-474.
    A series of lengthy and chatty arguments suggesting that most criticism written on the various arts is preoccupied with a misguided sense of the critics' own objectivity. Boas gives examples--there seem to be hundreds--aptly drawn to demonstrate his thesis that what the art-work actually meant to the artist and spectator varies from era to era, from culture to culture, and from class to class. On these grounds Mr. Boas offers a plea "for the understanding of disagreement in matters of taste."--G. (...)
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  5.  16
    Vladimir Solovyev and Max Scheler: Attempt at a Comparative Interpretation. [REVIEW]D. D. G. - 1976 - Review of Metaphysics 29 (3):545-545.
    Scheler and Solovyev are two thinkers who have received little or no attention among the members of the Anglo-American philosophical community. Perhaps part of this neglect is political, and part is due to availability of texts. Dahm’s comparative analysis offers a thorough presentation of the major points of each thinker and it places them in the context of the history of philosophy.
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  6.  19
    Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Criticism. [REVIEW]D. D. G. - 1964 - Review of Metaphysics 17 (3):484-485.
    A superior anthology of writings on criticism and its philosophic bases. Six problems are presented. Half a dozen or so selections explore each problem. Levich's lodestar is a conviction that criticism and the philosophy of art are mutually dependent upon one another. Drawing skillfully on the rich fields of contemporary literary and art criticism, he juxtaposes writings of critics and writings of a number of philosophers in such a manner as to highlight themes common to both.--G. D. D.
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  7.  15
    Huysmans. [REVIEW]D. D. G. - 1964 - Review of Metaphysics 17 (4):625-625.
    A brief account of Huysmans' life and major works. The narration is made to pivot upon Huysmans' turn to Catholicism; the conversion itself, however, is treated in a somewhat superficial manner. Critical opinions in the book appear for the most part to have flowered from stock secondary material.--G. D. D.
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  8.  11
    Experience and Reason. [REVIEW]D. D. G. - 1974 - Review of Metaphysics 28 (2):352-352.
    Mall indicates that his study of Husserl and Hume is one that demonstrates programmatic similarities. Much of his study is on Husserl’s concepts dealing with reason and experience. These concepts are compared to Hume’s basic philosophical concepts. Mall believes that Hume’s philosophy of human nature has some similarity to Husserl’s transcendental subjectivity. Hume’s concept of imagination "foreshadowed Husserl’s concept of constitution." Hume’s analysis of experience which is at the level of "mundane existence" is similar to Husserl’s pre-predicative experience. Yet, as (...)
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  9.  11
    Philosophical Anthropology. [REVIEW]D. D. G. - 1974 - Review of Metaphysics 28 (2):351-352.
    By examining the themes man and God, man and animal, and man as a rational being, Landmann provides a perspective that must be considered in understanding man’s life in culture and society. His view is that man is social and this aspect is the precondition of his cultural life. Man, as Landmann indicates, "produces cultures" and is more "strongly determined by cultural factors" than genetic factors. Whatever a man may believe about the static features in society, it is nevertheless pervaded (...)
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  10.  13
    Mysterium Conjunctionis. [REVIEW]D. D. G. - 1964 - Review of Metaphysics 17 (4):628-628.
    Volume 14 in the Bollingen Series Collected Works, is the result of Jung's interest in the symbolic significance of alchemy. Various ancient modes of symbolism are held to prefigure Jung's own theory of psychological growth as the union of opposites. Numerous esoteric texts from the old alchemists receive lengthy commentary. A curious and elusive odyssey; recommended only for the most zealous of devotees.--G. D. D.
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  11.  10
    The Tragic Protest. [REVIEW]D. D. G. - 1964 - Review of Metaphysics 18 (2):378-378.
    A discussion of the tragic from a Heideggerian perspective. Oedipus Rex, Aeschylus's Prometheus Bound, Hamlet, Faust, An Enemy of the People, Death of a Salesman, and The Flies are examined in separate chapters. The rhetoric makes for difficult reading, and the analyses themselves turn out to be somewhat conventional. More interesting are the author's concluding suggestions: he argues forcibly for the need to find some deeper ground underlying both tragic "experience" and tragic "expression."—G. D. D.
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  12.  8
    Hoffmann. [REVIEW]D. D. G. - 1964 - Review of Metaphysics 17 (4):635-635.
    An introduction to both the literary works and the music criticism of Hoffmann. Hoffmann's affinities with Schelling and Schopenhauer are discussed, and his ties to the overall German Romanticism movement carefully traced. A pleasant and readable essay.--G. D. D.
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  13.  6
    From Substance to Subject: Studies in Hegel. [REVIEW]D. D. G. - 1975 - Review of Metaphysics 29 (1):148-148.
    As Professor Rotenstreich indicates "the purpose of the present analysis is to work out in detail Hegel’s attempted reconciliation of substance and subject." Using the major texts of Hegel, Rotenstreich reveals that the subject precedes the various stages of the dialectic rather than coming at the end of the process. Brought into the analysis is the notion of time which is Hegel’s "stumbling block" in reconciling thought and concept with actuality. In addition, the element of history in the philosophy of (...)
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  14.  19
    The Essence of Manifestation. [REVIEW]D. D. G. - 1974 - Review of Metaphysics 28 (2):349-350.
    Michael Henry’s study centers around the theme of interiority and subjectivity in the problematic of Being. It is a study that examines the structures of Being as theorized by various continental philosophers. Henry criticizes Kant, Heidegger, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty and Scheler for their notions on the structure of Being. He believes that "presence is the foundation of knowledge" and that "Being is the desire of self." Henry indicates that the "essence of manifestation is a structure... constituted by the ontological process of (...)
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  15.  6
    Storia Della Filosofia. [REVIEW]D. D. G. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):578-578.
    A reference work containing summaries of all major and most minor figures in the history of Western philosophy. The summaries are concise, informative, and well-written. Bibliography and some biographical material are included. One might quarrel over accent—e.g., James and Peirce together are allotted fewer pages than some exceedingly and properly obscure church fathers. However, all important movements and modes of thought are presented. The interpretations and evaluations of the phenomenological movement seem in general a degree more knowledgeable than those of (...)
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