Results for 'From Richard Swinburne'

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  1. Richard Swinburne.From Richard Swinburne - 1999 - In Nigel Warburton (ed.), Philosophy: The Basic Readings. Routledge.
     
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  2.  9
    Reason and Faith: Themes from Richard Swinburne.Raphael Lataster - 2019 - Philosophical Quarterly 69 (276):647-650.
    Reason and Faith: Themes from Richard Swinburne. Edited by Bergmann Michael and Brower Jeffrey E.
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    Reason and Faith: Themes from Richard Swinburne: Michael Bergmann and Jeffrey E. Brower (Eds.): Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, 256 pp, $72. [REVIEW]Isaac Choi - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 87 (2):193-197.
  4.  3
    Michael Bergmann and Jeffrey Brower, eds. Reason & Faith: Themes from Richard Swinburne.Kevin Kinghorn - 2018 - Journal of Analytic Theology 6:748-753.
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  5. Richard Swinburne’s Concept of Religious Experience. An Analysis and Critique.Gregor Nickel & Dieter Schönecker - 2014 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 6 (1):177--198.
    The so-called ”argument from religious experience’ plays a prominent role in today’s analytical philosophy of religion. It is also of considerable importance to richard Swinburne’s apologetic project. However, rather than joining the polyphonic debate around this argument, the present paper examines the fundamental concept of religious experience. The upshot is that Swinburne neither develops a convincing concept of experience nor explains what makes a religious experience religious. The first section examines some problems resulting mainly from (...)
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    Some Reflections on Richard Swinburne's Argument from Design.Mark Wynn - 1993 - Religious Studies 29 (3):325 - 335.
    In his book The Existence of God , Professor Swinburne develops a cumulative case for theism. As part of this case, he presents two forms of the argument from design, one form taking as its premise the fact of spatial order, the other proceeding from the fact of temporal order. In this paper, I shall concern myself with the second of these arguments; that is, in Swinburne's terms, I shall concern myself with the argument from (...)
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  7.  93
    Richard Swinburne, the existence of God, and principle P.Jeremy Gwiazda - 2009 - Sophia 48 (4):393-398.
    Swinburne relies on principle P in The Existence of God to argue that God is simple and thus likely to exist. In this paper, I argue that Swinburne does not support P. In particular, his arguments from mathematical simplicity and scientists’ preferences both fail. Given the central role P plays in Swinburne’s overall argument in The Existence of God , I conclude that Swinburne should further support P if his argument that God likely exists is (...)
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  8.  17
    How the divine properties fit together: Reply to gwiazda: Richard Swinburne.Richard Swinburne - 2009 - Religious Studies 45 (4):495-498.
    Jeremy Gwiazda has criticized my claim that God, understood as an omnipotent, omniscient, and perfectly free person is a person ‘of the simplest possible kind’ on the grounds that omnipotence etc. as spelled out by me are omnipotence etc. of restricted kinds, and so less simple forms of these properties than maximal forms would be. However the account which I gave of these properties in The Christian God shows that, when they are defined in certain ways, they all follow (...) one property of ‘pure, limitless, intentional power’. I argue here that a person who has these properties so defined is a person ‘of the simplest possible kind’. (shrink)
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  9. Why Richard Swinburne Won’t ‘Rot in Hell’: A Defense of Tough-minded Theodicy. [REVIEW]Peter Forrest - 2010 - Sophia 49 (1):37-47.
    In his recent paper in Sophia , ‘Theodicy: The Solution to the Problem of Evil, or Part of the Problem?’ Nick Trakakis endorses the position that theodicy, whether intellectually successful or not, is a morally obnoxious enterprise. My aim in this paper is to defend theodicy from this accusation. I concede that God the Creator is a moral monster by human standards and neither to be likened to a loving parent nor imitated. Nonetheless, God is morally perfect. What is (...)
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  10.  21
    Revelation: From Metaphor to Analogy (Second edition). By Richard Swinburne. Pp. vii, 373, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007, £21.00/£55.00. [REVIEW]Richard Briggs - 2012 - Heythrop Journal 53 (2):283-284.
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    Revelation: From Metaphor to Analogy (Second edition). By Richard Swinburne. Pp. vii, 373, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007, £21.00/£55.00. [REVIEW]Richard Briggs - 2012 - Heythrop Journal 53 (2):283-284.
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    Richard Swinburne, 'The Existence of God'.Jeremy Gwiazda - 2009 - Sophia 48 (4):393 - 398.
    Swinburne relies on principle P in ’The Existence of God’ to argue that God is simple and thus likely to exist. In this paper, I argue that Swinburne does not support P. In particular, his arguments from mathematical simplicity and scientists’ preferences both fail. Given the central role P plays in Swinburne’s overall argument in ’The Existence of God’, I conclude that Swinburne should further support P if his argument that God likely exists is to (...)
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  13. Two Peas in a Single Polytheistic Pod: Richard Swinburne and John Hick.Daniel Howard-Snyder - 2016 - Journal of Philosophical Research 41 (Supplement):17-32.
    A descriptive polytheist thinks there are at least two gods. John Hick and Richard Swinburne are descriptive polytheists. In this respect, they are like Thomas Aquinas and many other theists. What sets Swinburne and Hick apart from Aquinas, however, is that unlike him they are normative polytheists. That is, Swinburne and Hick think that it is right that we, or at least some of us, worship more than one god. However, the evidence available to me (...)
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    Review of "Revelation: From Metaphor to Analogy and The Resurrection of God Incarnate" by Richard Swinburne[REVIEW]Chris Jackson - 2018 - Essays in Philosophy 19 (2):364-382.
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    Revelation: From Metaphor to Analogy. By Richard Swinburne.Shawn D. Floyd - 1995 - Modern Schoolman 72 (4):357-361.
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    Intimations of The Good: Iris Murdoch, Richard Swinburne and the Promise of Theism.F. B. A. Asiedu - 2001 - Heythrop Journal 42 (1):26-49.
    Perhaps no one in the English speaking world has carried on a philosophical defence of theism like Richard Swinburne. Yet in all of Swinburne's work there is little use of a long‐standing view in the Christian tradition that God is good, and that his goodness is interchangeable with his being. While Swinburne does little with the idea of goodness, Iris Murdoch proposes an anti‐theistic view that insists on the Good without God. My argument is that both (...)
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  17. Design defended: Swinburne Defending design.Richard Swinburne - 2004 - Think 2 (6):13-18.
    Richard Swinburne responds to criticisms of his arguments from design for the existence of God.
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    Swinburne's arguments from design.Richard Norman - 2003 - Think 2 (4):35-41.
    In issue one, Richard Swinburne presented two ingenious versions of the argument from design. Here, Richard Norman questions both arguments.
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    Revelation: From Metaphor to Analogy (Second Edition).Richard Swinburne - 2009 - Philosophia Christi 11 (1):249 - 252.
    The great religions often claim that their books or creeds contain truths revealed by God. How could we know that they do? In the second edition of Revelation, renowned philosopher of religion Richard Swinburne addresses this central question. But since the books of great religions often contain much poetry and parable, Swinburne begins by investigating how eternal truth can be conveyed in unfamiliar genres, by analogy and metaphor, within false presuppositions about science and history. In the final (...)
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  20. From mental/physical identity to substance dualism.Richard Swinburne - 2007 - In Peter van Inwagen & Dean Zimmerman (eds.), Persons: Human and Divine. Clarendon Press.
  21.  89
    Swinburne's argument from religious experience.Richard M. Gale - 1994 - In Alan G. Padgett (ed.), Reason and the Christian Religion. Clarendon Press. pp. 39--63.
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  22.  2
    Revelation: From Metaphor to Analogy.Richard Swinburne - 1991 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Christianity and other religions claim that their books and creeds contain truths revealed by God. How can we know whether they do? Revelation investigates the claim of the Christian religion to have such revealed truths; and so considers which parts of the Bible are to be regarded as literal history, and which as metaphorical truth. This entirely rewritten second edition contains a long new chapter examining whether traditional Christian claims about personal morality can be regarded as revealed truths.
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  23. Mind, Brain, and Free Will.Richard Swinburne - 2012 - Oxford: Oxford University Press UK.
    Richard Swinburne presents a powerful new case for substance dualism and for libertarian free will. He argues that pure mental events are distinct from physical events and interact with them, and claims that no result from neuroscience or any other science could show that interaction does not take place. Swinburne goes on to argue for agent causation, and claims that it is we, and not our intentions, that cause our brain events. It is metaphysically possible (...)
  24. The Existence of God.Richard Swinburne - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    Richard Swinburne presents a substantially rewritten and updated edition of his most celebrated book. No other work has made a more powerful case for the probability of the existence of God. Swinburne gives a rigorous and penetrating analysis of the most important arguments for theism: the cosmological argument; arguments from the existence of laws of nature and the 'fine-tuning' of the universe; from the occurrence of consciousness and moral awareness; and from miracles and religious (...)
  25. Critical study of Providence and the Problem of Evil, by Richard Swinburne.Paul Draper - 2001 - Noûs 35 (3):456–474.
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    The Existence of God.Richard Swinburne - 2004 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Richard Swinburne presents a substantially rewritten and updated edition of his most celebrated book. No other work has made a more powerful case for the probability of the existence of God. Swinburne gives a rigorous and penetrating analysis of the most important arguments for theism: the cosmological argument; arguments from the existence of laws of nature and the 'fine-tuning' of the universe; from the occurrence of consciousness and moral awareness; and from miracles and religious (...)
  27. Revelation: From Metaphor to Analogy.Richard Swinburne - 1993 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 34 (3):189-191.
     
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  28. The argument to God from fine-tuning reassessed.Richard Swinburne - 2003 - In Neil A. Manson (ed.), God and Design: The Teleological Argument and Modern Science. Routledge. pp. 80--105.
    It is most improbable a priori that laws of nature should have a form, and their constants have values, and the variables of the boundary conditions of our universe should have values, of such a kind as to lead to the evolution of human bodies. If there is a God it is quite probable that there would be human bodies. Our only grounds for believing that there are other universes, are grounds for believing that those universes are governed by the (...)
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  29. Epistemic Justification.Richard Swinburne - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    Richard Swinburne offers an original treatment of a question at the heart of epistemology: what makes a belief rational, or justified in holding? He maps the rival accounts of philosophers on epistemic justification ("internalist" and "externalist"), arguing that they are really accounts of different concepts. He distinguishes between synchronic justification (justification at a time) and diachronic justification (synchronic justification resulting from adequate investigation)--both internalist and externalist. He also argues that most kinds of justification are worth having because (...)
  30. Selections from Personal identity : the dualist theory.Richard Swinburne - 2009 - In John P. Lizza (ed.), Defining the Beginning and End of Life: Readings on Personal Identity and Bioethics. Johns Hopkins University Press.
     
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  31. Is There a God?Richard Swinburne - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
    At least since Darwin's Origin of Species was published in 1859, it has increasingly become accepted that the existence of God is, intellectually, a lost cause, and that religious faith is an entirely non-rational matter--the province of those who willingly refuse to accept the dramatic advances of modern cosmology. Are belief in God and belief in science really mutually exclusive? Or, as noted philosopher of science and religion Richard Swinburne puts forth, can the very same criteria which scientists (...)
  32. The Evidential Argument From Evil.Richard Swinburne - 1996 - Indiana Univ Pr.
  33.  3
    Was Jesus God?Richard Swinburne - 2008 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The orderliness of the universe and the existence of human beings already provides some reason for believing that there is a God - as argued in Richard Swinburne's earlier book Is There a God? Swinburne now claims that it is probable that the main Christian doctrines about the nature of God and his actions in the world are true. In virtue of his omnipotence and perfect goodness, God must be a Trinity, live a human life in order (...)
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  34. Debating Design: From Darwin to Dna.Richard Swinburne - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
  35. The Argument from Laws of Nature Reassessed.Richard Swinburne - 2004 - In M. Ruse & W. Dembski (eds.), Debating Design: From Darwin to Dna. Cambridge University Press.
    I analyze different accounts of laws of nature: the Hume-Lewis regularity account, the Armstrong-Tooley relations between universals account, and my preferred account in terms of the powers and liabilities of individual substances. On any account it is most unlikely a priori that a universe would be governed by simple laws of nature. But if there is a God, it is quite probable that he will choose to create free agents of limited power, and to put them in a universe governed (...)
     
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  36. Arguments from Design.Richard Swinburne - 2002 - Think 1 (1):49 - 54.
    I distinguish between the argument to the existence of God from the operation of laws of nature and the argument from the laws being of such a kind as (together with the boundary conditions of the universe) to lead to the evolution of humans. There could not be a ’scientific’ explanation of these data, but there could be a ’personal’ explanation that they were caused by a person in virtue of his powers and purposes. The simplest and so (...)
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  37. The Argument to God from the Laws of Nature.Richard Swinburne - 2010 - In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 213--222.
    This chapter contains sections titled: * Notes.
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  38.  40
    Sobel on Arguments from Design.Richard Swinburne - 2006 - Philosophia Christi 8 (2):227 - 234.
    In his ’Logic and Theism’ Sobel claims that the allocation of prior probabilities to theories is a purely subjective matter. I claim that there are objective criteria for determining prior probabilities of theories (dependent on their simplicity and scope); and if there were not, science would be a totally irrational activity. I reject Sobel’s main criticism of my own cumulative argument for the existence of God that I argue illegitimately from each datum raising the probability of theism to the (...)
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    From belief to understanding by Richard Campbell.G. Swinburne - 1977 - Philosophical Books 18 (2):69-71.
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  40. The Argument to God from Fine-Tuning.Richard Swinburne - 2010 - In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 223--233.
    This chapter contains sections titled: * Fine-Tuning * Notes.
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  41.  70
    The Argument to the Soul from Partial Brain Transplants.Richard Swinburne - 2018 - Philosophia Christi 20 (1):13-19.
    Suppose we transplant the left hemisphere of one person, Alexandra, into the skull of another person, Alex, from whom both cerebral hemispheres have been removed; and transplant Alexandra’s right hemisphere into the skull of another person, Sandra, both of whose cerebral hemispheres have been removed. Both of the resulting persons will then have some of Alexandra’s brain and probably almost all of her memories and character. But since at most only one of them can be Alexandra, being Alexandra must, (...)
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    Revelation: From Metaphor to Analogy.Eleonore Stump & Richard Swinburne - 1994 - Philosophical Review 103 (4):739.
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  43. Prior probabilities in the argument from fine-tuning.Richard Swinburne - 2005 - Faith and Philosophy 22 (5):641 - 653.
    Theism is a far simpler hypothesis, and so a priori more probably true, than naturalism, understood as the hypothesis that the existence of this law-governed universe has no explanation. Theism postulates only one entity (God) with very simple properties, whereas naturalism has to postulate either innumerable entities all having the same properties, or one very complicated entity with the power to produce the former. If theism is true, it is moderately probable that God would create humanoid beings and so humanoid (...)
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    Reason and Faith: Themes From Swinburne.Michael Bergmann & Jeffrey E. Brower (eds.) - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The past fifty years have been an enormously fruitful period in the field of philosophy of religion, and few have done more to advance its development during this time than Richard Swinburne. His pioneering work has systematically developed a comprehensive set of positions within this field, and made major contributions to fields such as metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of science. This volume presents a collection of ten new essays in philosophy of religion that develop and critically engage themes (...)
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  45.  70
    The Resurrection of God Incarnate.Richard Swinburne - 2003 - Clarendon Press.
    Reasons for believing that Jesus rose from the dead.
  46.  88
    Some Major Strands of Theodicy.Richard Swinburne - 1996 - In D. Howard-Snycer (ed.), The Evidential Argument From Evil. Indiana Univ Pr. pp. 30-48.
    Theodicy would be an impossible task if the only good states were pleasures and the only bad states were pains. This paper lists many other and greater goods, and shows that many of these cannot be had without corresponding bad states. These goods include the satisfaction of persistent desires, desires for incompatible good states, compassion with people in serious trouble, free choice of the good despite temptation, and being of use to others in providing knowledge and opportunities of certain sorts (...)
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  47.  70
    Miracles.Richard Swinburne (ed.) - 1989 - Macmillan.
    "This book is about miracles -- what they are, what would count as evidence that they have occurred. It is not primarily concerned with historical evidence about whether certain particular miracles (such as Christ rising from the dead or walking on water) have occurred, but it is primarily concerned with whether historical evidence could show anything about such things and whether it matters if it can. It is concerned with the framework within which a historical debate must be conducted. (...)
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  48.  63
    Swinburne on the Resurrection: Negative versus Christian Ramified Natural Theology.Robert Greg Cavin & Carlos A. Colombetti - 2013 - Philosophia Christi 15 (2):253-263.
    We consider the impact of negative natural theology on the prospects of Christian ramified natural theology with reference to Richard Swinburne’s argument for the Incarnation and Resurrection. We argue that Swinburne’s pivotal claim—that God would not allow deceptive evidence to exist for the Incarnation and Resurrection—is refuted by key evidence from negative natural theology. We argue, further, that Swinburne’s argument omits dominating items of evidence of negative natural theology which seem to critically weaken the probability (...)
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  49. Could There Be More Than One God?Richard Swinburne - 1988 - Faith and Philosophy 5 (3):225 - 241.
    THERE COULD BE MORE THAN ONE GOD (DEFINED BY THE NORMAL DIVINE PREDICATES), ONLY IF A FIRST GOD BRINGS ABOUT (FROM ETERNITY) A SECOND GOD, AND THE FIRST TWO BRING ABOUT A THIRD GOD. IN ORDER TO EVINCE THE GOODNESS OF SHARING AND COOPERATING IN SHARING, THEY WILL DO THIS NECESSARILY. BUT THEY DO NOT HAVE TO PRODUCE A FOURTH GOD; AND SINCE A GOD MUST EXIST NECESSARILY IF AT ALL, THERE WILL BE AND CAN BE ONLY THREE GODS. (...)
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    How to define ‘Moral Realism’.Richard Swinburne - 2020 - Journal of Philosophical Theological Research 22 (3):15-33.
    Moral realism is the doctrine that some propositions asserting that some action is ‘morally’ good are true. This paper examines three different definitions of what it is for an action to be ‘morally’ good which would make moral realism a clear and plausible view. The first defines ‘morally good as ‘overall important to do’; and the second defines it as ‘overall important to do for universalizable reasons’. The paper argues that neither of these definitions is adequate; and it develops the (...)
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