67 found
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  1. MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences.Robert Andrew Wilson & Frank C. Keil (eds.) - 1999 - Cambridge, USA: MIT Press.
    "Amongst the human mind's proudest accomplishments is the invention of a science dedicated to understanding itself: cognitive science. ... This volume is an authoritative guide to this exhilarating new body of knowledge, written by the experts, edited with skill and good judment. If we were to leave a time capsule for the next millennium with records of the great achievements of civilization, this volume would have to be in it."--Steven Pinker.
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  2.  16
    Constraints on Knowledge and Cognitive Development.Frank C. Keil - 1981 - Psychological Review 88 (3):197-227.
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  3.  6
    Online Developmental Science to Foster Innovation, Access, and Impact.Mark Sheskin, Kimberly Scott, Candice M. Mills, Elika Bergelson, Elizabeth Bonawitz, Elizabeth S. Spelke, Li Fei-Fei, Frank C. Keil, Hyowon Gweon, Joshua B. Tenenbaum, Julian Jara-Ettinger, Karen E. Adolph, Marjorie Rhodes, Michael C. Frank, Samuel A. Mehr & Laura Schulz - 2020 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 24 (9):675-678.
  4.  12
    Searching for Explanations: How the Internet Inflates Estimates of Internal Knowledge.Matthew Fisher, Mariel K. Goddu & Frank C. Keil - 2015 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 144 (3):674-687.
  5. Explanation and Cognition.Frank C. Keil & Robert A. Wilson - 2000 - MIT Press.
    These essays draw on work in the history and philosophy of science, the philosophy of mind and language, the development of concepts in children, conceptual..
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  6. Thinking Through Language.Paul Bloom & Frank C. Keil - 2001 - Mind and Language 16 (4):351–367.
    What would it be like to have never learned English, but instead only to know Hopi, Mandarin Chinese, or American Sign Language? Would that change the way you think? Imagine entirely losing your language, as the result of stroke or trauma. You are aphasic, unable to speak or listen, read or write. What would your thoughts now be like? As the most extreme case, imagine having been raised without any language at all, as a wild child. What—if anything—would it be (...)
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  7.  11
    Constraints on Constraints: Surveying the Epigenetic Landscape.Frank C. Keil - 1990 - Cognitive Science 14 (1):135-168.
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  8.  38
    Categorical Effects in the Perception of Faces.James M. Beale & Frank C. Keil - 1995 - Cognition 57 (3):217-239.
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  9.  75
    Folkscience: Coarse Interpretations of a Complex Reality.Frank C. Keil - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (8):368-373.
    The rise of appeals to intuitive theories in many areas of cognitive science must cope with a powerful fact. People understand the workings of the world around them in far less detail than they think. This illusion of knowledge depth has been uncovered in a series of recent studies and is caused by several distinctive properties of explanatory understanding not found in other forms of knowledge. Other experimental work has shown that people do have skeletal frameworks of expectations that constrain (...)
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  10.  45
    The Shadows and Shallows of Explanation.Robert A. Wilson & Frank C. Keil - 2000 - In Frank C. Keil & Robert A. Wilson (eds.), Explanation and Cognition. Cambridge: MIT Press.. pp. 87-114.
    Reprinted, with modification, from Wilson and Keil 1998.
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  11. The Acquisition of Natural Kind and Artifact Terms.Frank C. Keil - 1986 - In William Demopoulos (ed.), Language Learning and Concept Acquisition. Ablex. pp. 133--153.
     
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  12.  21
    Knowing When Help Is Needed: A Developing Sense of Causal Complexity.Jonathan F. Kominsky, Anna P. Zamm & Frank C. Keil - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (2):491-523.
    Research on the division of cognitive labor has found that adults and children as young as age 5 are able to find appropriate experts for different causal systems. However, little work has explored how children and adults decide when to seek out expert knowledge in the first place. We propose that children and adults rely on “mechanism metadata,” information about mechanism information. We argue that mechanism metadata is relatively consistent across individuals exposed to similar amounts of mechanism information, and it (...)
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  13.  18
    An Abstract to Concrete Shift in the Development of Biological Thought: The Insides Story.Daniel J. Simons & Frank C. Keil - 1995 - Cognition 56 (2):129-163.
  14. Explaining Explanation.Robert A. Wilson & Frank C. Keil - 2000 - In Frank C. And Wilson Keil (ed.), Explanation and Cognition. Cambridge, MA, USA: pp. 1-18.
    It is not a particularly hard thing to want or seek explanations. In fact, explanations seem to be a large and natural part of our cognitive lives. Children ask why and how questions very early in development and seem genuinely to want some sort of answer, despite our often being poorly equipped to provide them at the appropriate level of sophistication and detail. We seek and receive explanations in every sphere of our adult lives, whether it be to understand why (...)
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  15.  37
    Where's the Essence? Developmental Shifts in Children's Beliefs About Internal Features.George E. Newman & Frank C. Keil - unknown
    The present studies investigated children’s and adults’ intuitive beliefs about the physical nature of essences. Adults and children (ranging in age from 6 to 10 years old) were asked to reason about two different ways of determining an unknown object’s category: taking a tiny internal sample from any part of the object (distributed view of essence), or taking a sample from one specific region (localized view of essence). Results from three studies indicated that adults strongly endorsed the distributed view, and (...)
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  16.  58
    The Feasibility of Folk Science.Frank C. Keil - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (5):826-862.
    If folk science means individuals having well worked out mechanistic theories of the workings of the world, then it is not feasible. Laypeople’s explanatory understandings are remarkably coarse, full of gaps, and often full of inconsistencies. Even worse, most people overestimate their own understandings. Yet recent views suggest that formal scientists may not be so different. In spite of these limitations, science somehow works and its success offers hope for the feasibility of folk science as well. The success of science (...)
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  17.  14
    Discerning the Division of Cognitive Labor: An Emerging Understanding of How Knowledge Is Clustered in Other Minds.Frank C. Keil, Courtney Stein, Lisa Webb, Van Dyke Billings & Leonid Rozenblit - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (2):259-300.
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  18.  9
    Core Cognition in Adult Vision: A Surprising Discrepancy Between the Principles of Object Continuity and Solidity.Andreas Falck, Ghislaine Labouret, Véronique Izard, Annie E. Wertz, Frank C. Keil & Brent Strickland - 2020 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 149 (12):2250-2263.
    From an early age, humans intuitively expect physical objects to obey core principles, including continuity (objects follow spatiotemporally continuous paths) and solidity (two solid objects cannot occupy the same space at the same time). These 2 principles are sometimes viewed as deriving from a single overarching “persistence” principle. Indeed, violations of solidity where one solid object seemingly passes through another could theoretically be interpreted as a violation of continuity, with an object “teleporting” to switch places rather than passing through a (...)
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  19.  7
    Judgments of Spatial Extent Are Fundamentally Illusory: ‘Additive-Area’ Provides the Best Explanation.Sami R. Yousif, Richard N. Aslin & Frank C. Keil - 2020 - Cognition 205:104439.
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  20. Explanation, Association, and the Acquisition of Word Meaning.Frank C. Keil - 1994 - Lingua 92 (1-4):169--196.
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  21.  12
    The Illusion of Argument Justification.Matthew Fisher & Frank C. Keil - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (1):425-433.
  22.  39
    Do Houseflies Think? Patterns of Induction and Biological Beliefs in Development.Grant Gutheil, Alonzo Vera & Frank C. Keil - 1998 - Cognition 66 (1):33-49.
  23. The Concept Concept: The Wayward Path of Cognitive Science. [REVIEW]Frank C. Keil & Robert A. Wilson - 2000 - Mind and Language 15 (2-3):308-318.
    Critical discussion of Jerry Fodor's Concepts: Where Cognitive Science Went Wrong (1998).
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  24.  48
    “End-of-Life” Biases in Moral Evaluations of Others.George E. Newman, Kristi L. Lockhart & Frank C. Keil - 2010 - Cognition 115 (2):343-349.
  25.  86
    Children Use Temporal Cues to Learn Causal Directionality.Benjamin M. Rottman, Jonathan F. Kominsky & Frank C. Keil - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (3):489-513.
    The ability to learn the direction of causal relations is critical for understanding and acting in the world. We investigated how children learn causal directionality in situations in which the states of variables are temporally dependent (i.e., autocorrelated). In Experiment 1, children learned about causal direction by comparing the states of one variable before versus after an intervention on another variable. In Experiment 2, children reliably inferred causal directionality merely from observing how two variables change over time; they interpreted Y (...)
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  26.  18
    The Curse of Expertise: When More Knowledge Leads to Miscalibrated Explanatory Insight.Matthew Fisher & Frank C. Keil - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (5):1251-1269.
    Does expertise within a domain of knowledge predict accurate self-assessment of the ability to explain topics in that domain? We find that expertise increases confidence in the ability to explain a wide variety of phenomena. However, this confidence is unwarranted; after actually offering full explanations, people are surprised by the limitations in their understanding. For passive expertise, miscalibration is moderated by education; those with more education are accurate in their self-assessments. But when those with more education consider topics related to (...)
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  27. A World Apart: How Concepts of the Constructed World Are Different in Representation and in Development.Frank C. Keil, Marissa L. Greif & Rebekkah S. Kerner - 2007 - In Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (eds.), Creations of the Mind: Theories of Artifacts and Their Representaion. Oxford University Press. pp. 231--248.
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  28.  13
    Collective Recognition and Function in Concepts of Institutional Social Groups.Alexander Noyes & Frank C. Keil - 2020 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 149 (7):1344-1359.
  29.  17
    The More Things Change…: Metamorphoses and Conceptual Structure.Michael H. Kelly & Frank C. Keil - 1985 - Cognitive Science 9 (4):403-416.
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  30.  12
    On the Emergence of Semantic and Conceptual Distinctions.Frank C. Keil - 1983 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 112 (3):357-385.
  31.  19
    Children’s Developing Notions of Partiality.Candice M. Mills & Frank C. Keil - 2008 - Cognition 107 (2):528-551.
  32.  6
    How We See Area and Why It Matters.Sami R. Yousif & Frank C. Keil - forthcoming - Trends in Cognitive Sciences.
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  33.  11
    A Bump on a Bump? Emerging Intuitions Concerning the Relative Difficulty of the Sciences.Frank C. Keil, Kristi L. Lockhart & Esther Schlegel - 2010 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 139 (1):1-15.
  34.  24
    Overestimation of Knowledge About Word Meanings: The “Misplaced Meaning” Effect.Jonathan F. Kominsky & Frank C. Keil - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (8):1604-1633.
    Children and adults may not realize how much they depend on external sources in understanding word meanings. Four experiments investigated the existence and developmental course of a “Misplaced Meaning” effect, wherein children and adults overestimate their knowledge about the meanings of various words by underestimating how much they rely on outside sources to determine precise reference. Studies 1 and 2 demonstrate that children and adults show a highly consistent MM effect, and that it is stronger in young children. Study 3 (...)
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  35.  13
    The Emerging Causal Understanding of Institutional Objects.Alexander Noyes, Frank C. Keil & Yarrow Dunham - 2018 - Cognition 170:83-87.
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  36.  8
    Children’s and Adults’ Intuitions About Who Can Own Things.Nicholaus S. Noles, Frank C. Keil, Susan A. Gelman & Paul Bloom - 2012 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 12 (3-4):265-286.
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  37.  11
    Causal Inference and the Hierarchical Structure of Experience.Samuel G. B. Johnson & Frank C. Keil - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (6):2223-2241.
  38.  21
    Do Houseflies Think? Patterns of Induction and Biological Beliefs in development1Portions of This Manuscript Were Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Psychonomics Society, 1988.1. [REVIEW]Grant Gutheil, Alonzo Vera & Frank C. Keil - 1998 - Cognition 66 (1):33-49.
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  39.  54
    Spiders in the Web of Belief: The Tangled Relations Between Concepts and Theories.Frank C. Keil - 1989 - Mind and Language 4 (1-2):43-50.
  40.  70
    Concepts, Correlations, and Some Challenges for Connectionist Cognition.Gary F. Marcus & Frank C. Keil - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):722-723.
    Rogers & McClelland's (R&M's) précis represents an important effort to address key issues in concepts and categorization, but few of the simulations deliver what is promised. We argue that the models are seriously underconstrained, importantly incomplete, and psychologically implausible; more broadly, R&M dwell too heavily on the apparent successes without comparable concern for limitations already noted in the literature.
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  41.  6
    Understanding “Why:” How Implicit Questions Shape Explanation Preferences.Sehrang Joo, Sami R. Yousif & Frank C. Keil - 2022 - Cognitive Science 46 (2):e13091.
    Cognitive Science, Volume 46, Issue 2, February 2022.
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  42.  3
    Quantity Perception: The Forest and the Trees.Sami R. Yousif & Frank C. Keil - forthcoming - Cognition:105074.
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  43.  4
    Mechanism and Explanation in the Development of Biological Thought: The Case of Disease.Frank C. Keil, Daniel T. Levin, Bethany A. Richman & Grant Gutheil - 1999 - In D. Medin & S. Atran (eds.), Folkbiology. MIT Press.
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  44.  7
    When and Why Do Hedgehogs and Foxes Differ?Frank C. Keil - 2010 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 22 (4):415-426.
    Philip E. Tetlock's finding that "hedgehog" experts are worse predictors than "foxes" offers fertile ground for future research. Are experts as likely to exhibit hedgehog- or fox-like tendencies in areas that call for explanatory, diagnostic, and skill-based expertise-as they did when Tetlock called on experts to make predictions? Do particular domains of expertise curtail or encourage different styles of expertise? Can we trace these different styles to childhood? Finally, can we nudge hedgehogs to be more like foxes? Current research can (...)
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  45.  9
    Order, Order Everywhere, and Only an Agent to Think: The Cognitive Compulsion to Infer Intentional Agents.Frank C. Keil & George E. Newman - 2015 - Mind and Language 30 (2):117-139.
    Several studies demonstrate that an intuitive link between agents and order emerges within the first year of life. This appreciation seems importantly related to similar forms of inference, such as the Argument from Design. We suggest, however, that infants and young children may be more accurate in their tendencies to infer agents from order than older children and adults, who often infer intentional agents when there are none. Thus, the earliest inferences about intentional agents based on order may be quite (...)
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  46.  21
    Natural Categories and Natural Concepts.Frank C. Keil - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (2):293-294.
  47.  55
    Space—the Primal Frontier? Spatial Cognition and the Origins of Concepts.Frank C. Keil - 2008 - Philosophical Psychology 21 (2):241 – 250.
    The more carefully we look, the more impressive the repertoire of infant concepts seems to be. Across a wide range of tasks, infants seem to be using concepts corresponding to surprisingly high-level and abstract categories and relations. It is tempting to try to explain these abilities in terms of a core capacity in spatial cognition that emerges very early in development and then gets extended beyond reasoning about direct spatial arrays and events. Although such a spatial cognitive capacity may indeed (...)
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  48. Says Who? Children Consider Informants’ Sources When Deciding Whom to Believe.Rosie Aboody, Sami R. Yousif, Mark Sheskin & Frank C. Keil - forthcoming - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General.
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  49. 1. The Varieties of Artifact Kinds.Frank C. Keil, Marissa L. Greif & Rebekkah S. Kerner - 2007 - In Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (eds.), Creations of the Mind: Theories of Artifacts and Their Representaion. Oxford University Press. pp. 231.
     
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  50.  50
    How to Learn Multiple Tasks.Raffaele Calabretta, Andrea Ferdinanddio, Domenico Parisi & Frank C. Keil - 2008 - Biological Theory 3 (1):30-41.
    The article examines the question of how learning multiple tasks interacts with neural architectures and the flow of information through those architectures. It approaches the question by using the idealization of an artificial neural network where it is possible to ask more precise questions about the effects of modular versus nonmodular architectures as well as the effects of sequential versus simultaneous learning of tasks. A prior work has demonstrated a clear advantage of modular architectures when the two tasks must be (...)
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