Results for 'Fiona E. Raitt'

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  1.  48
    Suzanne M. Zeedyk, and Fiona E. Raitt, The Implicit Relation of Psychology and Law: Women and Syndrome Evidence. [REVIEW]Belinda Brooks-Grodon - 2002 - Feminist Legal Studies 10 (2):195-197.
  2.  19
    Expert Evidence As Context: Historical Patterns and Contemporary Attitudes in the Prosecution of Sexual Offences.Fiona E. Raitt - 2004 - Feminist Legal Studies 12 (2):233-244.
    In H.M. Advocate v. Grimmond1 the judge in a Scottish High Court trial refused permission for expert psychological evidence to be admitted on behalf of the Crown in a prosecution involving sexual offences against two children. The Crown had sought to lead an expert witness to explain to the jury about patterns of disclosure in child sexual abuse cases. The case was remarkable, not so much for the strict application of the longstanding rule in R. v. Turner that constrains the (...)
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  3.  10
    Mothers on Trial: Discourses of Cot Death and Munchausen’s Syndrome by Proxy. [REVIEW]Fiona E. Raitt & M. Suzanne Zeedyk - 2004 - Feminist Legal Studies 12 (3):257-278.
    This article explores some of the issues raised by Munchausen’s Syndrome by Proxy (MSbP) and the relationship between medicine and law, specifically the discourses which feature in the courtroom portraying motherhood and expectations of parenting. These discourses are often hidden yet play a determining role in prosecutions for alleged maltreatment of children involving medically unexplained infant death syndrome. We offer a critique of MSbP and seek to unveil the assumptions about mothers, the parent predominantly affected by the ‘diagnosis’, and mothering (...)
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  4.  21
    Vernacular Argumentation in The Testimony of William Thorpe.Fiona E. Somerset - 1996 - Mediaeval Studies 58 (1):207-241.
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  5.  41
    How the Giriśa Vidyāratna Press Acquired Its Fonts: A Supplement to the Work of Fiona G. E. RossHow the Girisa Vidyaratna Press Acquired Its Fonts: A Supplement to the Work of Fiona G. E. Ross. [REVIEW]Brian A. Hatcher & Fiona G. E. Ross - 2001 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 121 (4):637.
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  6.  4
    Contracted Time and Expanded Space: The Impact of Circumnavigation on Judgements of Space and Time.Iva K. Brunec, Amir-Homayoun Javadi, Fiona E. L. Zisch & Hugo J. Spiers - 2017 - Cognition 166:425-432.
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  7.  6
    Arthropod Intelligence? The Case for Portia.Fiona R. Cross, Georgina E. Carvell, Robert R. Jackson & Randolph C. Grace - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  8. Modes of Being at Sophist 255c-E.Fiona Leigh - 2012 - Phronesis 57 (1):1-28.
    Abstract I argue for a new interpretation of the argument for the non-identity of Being and Difference at Sophist 255c-e, which turns on a distinction between modes of being a property. Though indebted to Frede (1967), the distinction differs from his in an important respect: What distinguishes the modes is not the subject's relation to itself or to something numerically distinct, but whether it constitutes or conforms to the specification of some property. Thus my view, but not his, allows self-participation (...)
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  9.  34
    Redefining Disease? The Nosologic Implications of Molecular Genetic Knowledge.Fiona Alice Miller, Megan E. Begbie, Mita Giacomini, Catherine Ahern & Erin A. Harvey - 2006 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 49 (1):99-114.
  10.  13
    The Cracked Mirror: An Imperfect Case of Press Self-Examination.Fiona A. E. McQuarrie - 1992 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 7 (1):19 – 30.
    A July, 1990, controversy in British Columbia, Canada, involved a set of audiotapes detailing an apparent abuse of power by the province's attorney general and a relationship between the attorney general and a member of the press. The controversy was covered extensively in local media. A discussion of relevant ethical issues is followed by an analysis of their coverage in the press. Recommendations are made for more effective handling of ethical issues by media organizations and more meaningful reporting of such (...)
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  11.  25
    The Proportional Lack of Archaeal Pathogens: Do Viruses/Phages Hold the Key?Erin E. Gill & Fiona Sl Brinkman - 2011 - Bioessays 33 (4):248-254.
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  12.  44
    Excerpt From a Review of Fiona MacCarthy's Biography of Eric Gill Appearing in the November 1990 Issue of "Fidelity". [REVIEW]E. Michael Jones - 1991 - The Chesterton Review 17 (1):117-119.
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  13.  35
    Familial Patterns and the Origins of Individual Differences in Synaesthesia.Kylie J. Barnett, Ciara Finucane, Julian E. Asher, Gary Bargary, Aiden P. Corvin, Fiona N. Newell & Kevin J. Mitchell - 2008 - Cognition 106 (2):871-893.
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  14.  45
    Ethics of Neuroimaging After Serious Brain Injury.Charles Weijer, Andrew Peterson, Fiona Webster, Mackenzie Graham, Damian Cruse, Davinia Fernández-Espejo, Teneille Gofton, Laura E. Gonzalez-Lara, Andrea Lazosky, Lorina Naci, Loretta Norton, Kathy Speechley, Bryan Young & Adrian M. Owen - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):41.
    Patient outcome after serious brain injury is highly variable. Following a period of coma, some patients recover while others progress into a vegetative state (unresponsive wakefulness syndrome) or minimally conscious state. In both cases, assessment is difficult and misdiagnosis may be as high as 43%. Recent advances in neuroimaging suggest a solution. Both functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography have been used to detect residual cognitive function in vegetative and minimally conscious patients. Neuroimaging may improve diagnosis and prognostication. These techniques (...)
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  15.  85
    Situational Realism, Critical Realism, Causation and the Charge of Positivism.Fiona J. Hibberd - 2010 - History of the Human Sciences 23 (4):37-51.
    The system of realist philosophy developed by John Anderson — situational realism — has recently been dismissed as ‘positivist’ by a prominent critical realist. The reason for this dismissal appears not to be the usual list of ideas deemed positivist, but the conviction that situational realism mistakenly defends a form of actualism, i.e. that to conceive of causal laws as constant conjunctions reduces the domain of the real to the domain of the actual. This is, in part, a misreading of (...)
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  16.  21
    Symposium on J.-L. Dessalles’s Why We Talk : Precis by J.-L. Dessalles, Commentaries by E. Machery, F. Cowie, and J. Alexander, Replies by J.-L. Dessalles.Jean-Louis Dessalles, Edouard Machery, Fiona Cowie & Jason Mckenzie Alexander - 2010 - Biology and Philosophy 25 (5):851-901.
    This symposium discusses J.-L. Dessalles's account of the evolution of language, which was presented in Why we Talk.
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  17. Symposium on J.-L. Dessalles’s Why We Talk : Precis by J.-L. Dessalles, Commentaries by E. Machery, F. Cowie, and J. Alexander, Replies by J.-L. Dessalles. [REVIEW]Edouard Machery, Jean-Louis Dessalles, Fiona Cowie & Jason Alexander - 2010 - Biology and Philosophy 25 (5):851-901.
    This symposium discusses J.-L. Dessalles's account of the evolution of language, which was presented in Why we Talk (OUP 2007).
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  18.  19
    Insights & Perspectives.Jacques Dubochet, Sheila Ommeh, Aidan Budd, Mtakai Vald Ngara, Isaac Njaci, Etienne P. de Villiers, Erin E. Gill, Fiona Sl Brinkman, John R. Speakman & Colin Selman - unknown - Bioessays 33:240 - 242.
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  19. The Importance of Being Erroneous.Nils Kürbis - 2021 - Australasian Philosophical Review 2 (3):155-166.
    This is a commentary on MM McCabe's "First Chop your logos... Socrates and the sophists on language, logic, and development". In her paper MM analyses Plato's Euthydemos, in which Plato tackles the problem of falsity in a way that takes into account the speaker and complements the Sophist's discussion of what is said. The dialogue looks as if it is merely a demonstration of the silly consequences of eristic combat. And so it is. But a main point of MM's paper (...)
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  20. Cognitive Penetration of Colour Experience: Rethinking the Issue in Light of an Indirect Mechanism.Fiona Macpherson - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 84 (1):24-62.
    Can the phenomenal character of perceptual experience be altered by the states of one's cognitive system, for example, one's thoughts or beliefs? If one thinks that this can happen then one thinks that there can be cognitive penetration of perceptual experience; otherwise, one thinks that perceptual experience is cognitively impenetrable. I claim that there is one alleged case of cognitive penetration that cannot be explained away by the standard strategies one can typically use to explain away alleged cases. The case (...)
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  21.  56
    Doing and Allowing Harm.Fiona Woollard - 2015 - Oxford University Press.
    Fiona Woollard presents an original defence of the Doctrine of Doing and Allowing, according to which doing harm seems much harder to justify than merely allowing harm. She argues that the Doctrine is best understood as a principle that protects us from harmful imposition, and offers a moderate account of our obligations to offer aid to others.
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  22. What’s Within? Nativism Reconsidered.Fiona Cowie - 1998 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This powerfully iconoclastic book reconsiders the influential nativist position toward the mind. Nativists assert that some concepts, beliefs, or capacities are innate or inborn: "native" to the mind rather than acquired. Fiona Cowie argues that this view is mistaken, demonstrating that nativism is an unstable amalgam of two quite different--and probably inconsistent--theses about the mind. Unlike empiricists, who postulate domain-neutral learning strategies, nativists insist that some learning tasks require special kinds of skills, and that these skills are hard-wired into (...)
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  23. The Admissible Contents of Experience.Fiona Macpherson (ed.) - 2011 - Wiley-Blackwell.
  24. Ambiguous Figures and the Content of Experience.Fiona Macpherson - 2006 - Noûs 40 (1):82-117.
    Representationalism is the position that the phenomenal character of an experience is either identical with, or supervenes on, the content of that experience. Many representationalists hold that the relevant content of experience is nonconceptual. I propose a counterexample to this form of representationalism that arises from the phenomenon of Gestalt switching, which occurs when viewing ambiguous figures. First, I argue that one does not need to appeal to the conceptual content of experience or to judgements to account for Gestalt switching. (...)
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  25. XV—Cross‐Modal Experiences.Fiona Macpherson - 2011 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (3pt3):429-468.
    This paper provides a categorization of cross-modal experiences. There are myriad forms. Doing so allows us to think clearly about the nature of different cross-modal experiences and allows us to clearly formulate competing hypotheses about the kind of experiences involved in different cross-modal phenomena.
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  26. If This Is My Body … : A Defence of the Doctrine of Doing and Allowing.Fiona Woollard - 2013 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 94 (3):315-341.
    I defend the Doctrine of Doing and Allowing: the claim that doing harm is harder to justify than merely allowing harm. A thing does not genuinely belong to a person unless he has special authority over it. The Doctrine of Doing and Allowing protects us against harmful imposition – against the actions or needs of another intruding on what is ours. This protection is necessary for something to genuinely belong to a person. The opponent of the Doctrine must claim that (...)
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  27. V—Dimensions of Demandingness.Fiona Woollard - 2016 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 116 (1):89-106.
    The Demandingness Objection is the objection that a moral theory or principle is unacceptable because it asks more than we can reasonably expect. David Sobel, Shelley Kagan and Liam Murphy have each argued that the Demandingness Objection implicitly – and without justification – appeals to moral distinctions between different types of cost. I discuss three sets of cases each of which suggest that we implicitly assume some distinction between costs when applying the Demandingness Objection. We can explain each set of (...)
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  28. Colour Inversion Problems for Representationalism.Fiona Macpherson - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (1):127-152.
    In this paper I examine whether representationalism can account for various thought experiments about colour inversions. Representationalism is, at minimum, the view that, necessarily, if two experiences have the same representational content then they have the same phenomenal character. I argue that representationalism ought to be rejected if one holds externalist views about experiential content and one holds traditional exter- nalist views about the nature of the content of propositional attitudes. Thus, colour inver- sion scenarios are more damaging to externalist (...)
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  29. The Philosophy and Psychology of Hallucination: An Introduction.Fiona Macpherson - 2013 - In Fiona Macpherson Dimitris Platchias (ed.), Hallucination: Philosophy and Psychology. MIT Press. pp. 1-38.
  30. Redefining Illusion and Hallucination in Light of New Cases.Fiona Macpherson & Clare Batty - 2016 - Philosophical Issues 26 (1):263-296.
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  31. Novel Colours and the Content of Experience.Fiona Macpherson - 2003 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 84 (1):43-66.
    I propose a counterexample to naturalistic representational theories of phenomenal character. The counterexample is generated by experiences of novel colours reported by Crane and Piantanida. I consider various replies that a representationalist might make, including whether novel colours could be possible colours of objects and whether one can account for novel colours as one would account for binary colours or colour mixtures. I argue that none of these strategies is successful and therefore that one cannot fully explain the nature of (...)
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  32. G. E. Moore: Selected Writings.G. E. Moore - 1993 - Routledge.
    G.E. Moore, more than either Bertrand Russell or Ludwig Wittgenstein, was chiefly responsible for the rise of the analytic method in twentieth-century philosophy. This selection of his writings shows Moore at his very best. The classic essays are crucial to major philosophical debates that still resonate today. Amongst those included are: * A Defense of Common Sense * Certainty * Sense-Data * External and Internal Relations * Hume's Theory Explained * Is Existence a Predicate? * Proof of an External World (...)
     
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  33.  1
    God, Value, and Nature.Fiona Ellis - 2014 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Many philosophers believe that God has been put to rest. Naturalism is the default position, and the naturalist can explain what needs to be explained without recourse to God. This book agrees that we should be naturalists, but it rejects the more prevalent scientific naturalism in favour of an 'expansive' naturalism inspired by David Wiggins and John McDowell. Fiona Ellis draws on a wide range of thinkers from theology and philosophy, and spans the gulf between analytic and continental philosophy. (...)
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  34.  81
    Hallucination: Philosophy and Psychology.Fiona Macpherson & Dimitris Platchias (eds.) - 2013 - MIT Press.
    Scientific and philosophical perspectives on hallucination: essays that draw on empirical evidence from psychology, neuroscience, and cutting-edge philosophical theory.
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  35.  14
    Jill Raitt . Shapers of Religious Traditions in Germany, Switzerland, and Poland,1560–1600. Pp. Xx+ 224. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1981 £ 15.75. [REVIEW]Lyndal Roper - 1983 - Religious Studies 19 (4):556-558.
  36. The Ethics of Care: A Feminist Approach to Human Security.Fiona Robinson - 2011 - Temple University Press.
    Introduction -- The ethics of care and global politics -- Rethinking human security -- 'Women's work' : the global care and sex economies -- Humanitarian intervention and global security governance -- Peacebuilding and paternalism : reading care through postcolonialism -- Health and human security : gender, care and HIV/AIDS -- Gender, care, and the ethics of environmental security -- Conclusion. Security through care.
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  37. Care, Gender and Global Social Justice: Rethinking 'Ethical Globalization'.Fiona Robinson - 2006 - Journal of Global Ethics 2 (1):5 – 25.
    This article develops an approach to ethical globalization based on a feminist, political ethic of care; this is achieved, in part, through a comparison with, and critique of, Thomas Pogge's World Poverty and Human Rights. In his book, Pogge makes the valid and important argument that the global economic order is currently organized such that developed countries have a huge advantage in terms of power and expertise, and that decisions are reached purely and exclusively through self-interest. Pogge uses an institutional (...)
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  38. The Doctrine of Doing and Allowing I: Analysis of the Doing/Allowing Distinction.Fiona Woollard - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (7):448-458.
    According to the Doctrine of Doing and Allowing, the distinction between doing and allowing harm is morally significant. Doing harm is harder to justify than merely allowing harm. This paper is the first of a two paper critical overview of the literature on the Doctrine of Doing and Allowing. In this paper, I consider the analysis of the distinction between doing and allowing harm. I explore some of the most prominent attempts to analyse this distinction:. Philippa Foot’s sequence account, Warren (...)
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  39.  53
    Motherhood and Mistakes About Defeasible Duties to Benefit.Fiona Woollard - 2018 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 97 (1):126-149.
    Discussion of the behaviour of pregnant women and mothers, in academic literature, medical advice given to mothers, mainstream media and social media, assumes that a mother who fails to do something to benefit her child is liable for moral criticism unless she can provide sufficient countervailing considerations to justify her decision. I reconstruct the normally implicit reasoning that leads to this assumption and show that it is mistaken. First, I show that the discussion assumes that if any action might benefit (...)
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  40. A Disjunctive Theory of Introspection: A Reflection on Zombies and Anton's Syndrome.Fiona Macpherson - 2010 - Philosophical Issues 20 (1):226-265.
    Reflection on skeptical scenarios in the philosophy of perception, made vivid in the arguments from illusion and hallucination, have led to the formulation of theories of the metaphysical and epistemological nature of perceptual experience. In recent times, the locus of the debate concerning the nature of perceptual experience has been the dispute between disjunctivists and common-kind theorists. Disjunctivists have held that there are substantial dissimilarities (either metaphysical or epistemological or both) between veridical perceptual experiences occurring when one perceives and perceptual (...)
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  41. The Doctrine of Doing and Allowing II: The Moral Relevance of the Doing/Allowing Distinction.Fiona Woollard - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (7):459-469.
    According to the Doctrine of Doing and Allowing, the distinction between doing and allowing harm is morally significant. Doing harm is harder to justify than merely allowing harm. This paper is the second of a two paper critical overview of the literature on the Doctrine of Doing and Allowing. In this paper, I consider the moral status of the distinction between doing and allowing harm. I look at objections to the doctrine such as James’ Rachels’ Wicked Uncle Case and Jonathan (...)
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  42.  52
    Kant's Aesthetic Epistemology. [REVIEW]Fiona Hughes - 2010 - Kantian Review 14 (2):155.
    Drawing on resources from both the analytical and continental traditions, this book argues that a comprehension of Immanuel Kant's aesthetics is necessary for grasping the scope and force of his epistemology. It draws on phenomenological and aesthetic resources to bring out the continuing relevance of Kant's project. One of the difficulties faced in reading ‘The Critique of Pure Reason’ is finding a way of reading the text as one continuous discussion. This book offers a reading at each stage of Kant's (...)
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  43. Book Review: Justification by Faith—A Malter of Death and Life. [REVIEW]Jill Raitt - 1984 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 38 (1):98-100.
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  44.  11
    Globalizing Democracy and Human Rights, Carol C. Gould , 288 Pp., $70 Cloth, $24.99 Paper.Fiona Robinson - 2007 - Ethics and International Affairs 21 (2):263-265.
    Although the focus of "Globalizing Democracy and Human Rights" is practical, Gould does not shy away from hard theoretical questions, such as the relentless debate over cultural relativism, and the relationship between terrorism and democracy.
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  45. The Politics of Sex and Gender: Benhabib and Butler Debate Subjectivity.Fiona Webster - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (1):1-22.
    : This paper responds to the sense of "crisis" or "trouble" that dominates contemporary feminist debate about the categories of sex and gender. It argues that this perception of crisis has emerged from a fundamental confusion of theoretical and political issues concerning the implications of the sex/gender debate for political representation and agency. It explores the sense in which this confusion is manifest in a debate between Seyla Benhabib and Judith Butler.
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  46. Have We Solved the Non-Identity Problem?Fiona Woollard - 2012 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (5):677-690.
    Our pollution of the environment seems set to lead to widespread problems in the future, including disease, scarcity of resources, and bloody conflicts. It is natural to think that we are required to stop polluting because polluting harms the future individuals who will be faced with these problems. This natural thought faces Derek Parfit’s famous Non-Identity Problem ( 1984 , pp. 361–364). The people who live on the polluted earth would not have existed if we had not polluted. Our polluting (...)
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  47.  91
    Us, Them and It: Modules, Genes, Environments and Evolution.Fiona Cowie - 2008 - Mind and Language 23 (3):284–292.
    The Architecture of Mind is an ambitious and informative work, surveying an impressive range of empirical literature and arguing that the mind is massively modular. However, it suffers from two major theoretical flaws. First, Carruthers’ concept of a module is weak, so much so that it robs his thesis of massive modularity of any real substance. Second, his conception of how the mind’s modules evolved ignores the role of niche construction and cultural evolution to its detriment.
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  48. The Senses: Classic and Contemporary Philosophical Perspectives.Fiona Macpherson (ed.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press USA.
    The senses, or sensory modalities, constitute the different ways we have of perceiving the world, such as seeing, hearing, touching, tasting and smelling. But how many senses are there? How many could there be? What makes the senses different? What interaction takes place between the senses? This book is a guide to thinking about these questions. Together with an extensive introduction to the topic, the book contains the key classic papers on this subject together with nine newly commissioned essays.One reason (...)
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  49. A Passivity Prior to Passive and Active: Merleau-Ponty's Re-Reading of the Freudian Unconscious and Looking at Lascaux.Fiona Hughes - 2013 - Mind 122 (486):fzt061.
    Merleau-Ponty’s understanding of ‘passivity’ is a key to his account of perception. For Merleau-Ponty, perception is the way in which we are involved in the world, and it is on perception that the functions of understanding, reason, and reflection ultimately rest. While in his Phenomenology of Perception it is already clear that passive and active are intertwined, from a series of lectures he gave in 1954–5 we learn that inauguration or ‘institution’ arises out of a passivity that is not merely (...)
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  50. The Relationship Between Cognitive Penetration and Predictive Coding.Fiona Macpherson - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 47:6-16.
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