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  1.  9
    Refugees: The Politically Oppressed.Felix Bender - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 47 (5):615-633.
    Who should be recognized as a refugee? This article seeks to uncover the normative arguments at the core of legal and philosophical conceptions of refugeehood. It identifies three analytically dist...
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  2.  21
    Enfranchising the Disenfranchised: Should Refugees Receive Political Rights in Liberal Democracies?Felix Bender - forthcoming - Citizenship Studies.
    Should refugees receive political rights in liberal democracies? I argue that they should. Refugees are special – at least when it comes to claims towards democratic inclusion. They lack exit options and are significantly impacted by decisions made in liberal democracies. Enfranchisement is a matter of urgency to them and should occur on a national level. But what justifies the democratic inclusion of refugees? I draw on the all-subjected principle in arguing that all those subjected to rule in a political (...)
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  3.  25
    Refugees: The Politically Oppressed.Felix Bender - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 47 (5):615-633.
    Who should be recognized as a refugee? This article seeks to uncover the normative arguments at the core of legal and philosophical conceptions of refugeehood. It identifies three analytically distinct approaches grounding the right to refugee status and argues that all three are normatively inadequate. Refugee status should neither be grounded in individual persecution for specific reasons (classical approach) nor in individual persecution for any discriminatory reasons (human rights approach). It should also not be based solely on harm (humanitarian approach). (...)
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  4.  41
    Refugees, Development and Autocracies: On What Repairs the State System's Legitimacy.Felix Bender - 2021 - Ethical Perspectives 28 (3):356-361.
  5.  13
    Should Refugees Govern Refugee Camps?Felix Bender - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 1:1-24.
    Should refugees govern refugee camps? This paper argues that they should. It draws on normative political thought in consulting the all-subjected principle and an instrumental defense of democratic rule. The former holds that all those subjected to rule in a political unit should have a say in such rule. Through analyzing the conditions that pertain in refugee camps, the paper demonstrates that the all-subjected principle applies there, too. Refugee camps have developed as near distinct entities from their host states. They (...)
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  6.  28
    Abolishing Asylum and Violating the Human Rights of Refugees. Why is It Tolerated? The Case of Hungary in the EU.Felix Bender - 2020 - In Elżbieta M. Goździak, Izabella Main & Brigitte Suter (eds.), Europe and the Refugee Response. London, UK: Routledge.
    Why are human rights abuses of refugees at the EU’s geographical periphery tolerated by other EU states? This chapter uses the case of Hungary and Germany to explore how the former abolished the institution of asylum, shedding light on the human rights abuses of refugees, and why states such as the latter seem to condone such actions. It argues that core EU member states condone human rights abuses at the geographical periphery of the EU as long as they contribute to (...)
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  7.  2
    What Makes the Public Special? Political Philosophy, Methodology and Politically Motivated Research.Felix Bender - 2020 - Australasian Philosophical Review 4 (1):75-79.
    ABSTRACT Avner de Shalit argues that philosophers should listen to what the public thinks. He argues that by engaging with people in the streets, political philosophy will improve. Yet, what makes the public special in this regard? This response will do three things. First, it asks whether discussing with the public differs in any meaningful way from discussing with other people such as colleagues or students. Second, it questions the methodological approach, asking whether de Shalit's approach provides a legitimate answer (...)
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