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  1. Plato's Theory of Knowledge.F. M. Cornford - 1936 - Philosophy 11 (42):210-211.
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  2.  16
    The Ethics of Aristotle.F. M. Cornford - 1902 - International Journal of Ethics 12 (2):239-247.
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  3. Plato's Cosmology.F. M. Cornford - 1937 - Philosophy 12 (48):482-483.
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  4.  21
    Principium Sapientiae: The Origins of Greek Philosophical Thought.F. E. Sparshott & F. M. Cornford - 1954 - Philosophical Review 63 (4):606.
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  5. Mysticism and Science in the Pythagorean Tradition.F. M. Cornford - 1922 - Classical Quarterly 16 (3-4):137-.
    The object of this paper is to show that, in the sixth and fifth centuries B.C., two different and radically opposed systems of thought were elaborated within the Pythagorean school. They may be called respectively the mystical system and the scientific. All current accounts of Pythagoreanism known to me attempt to combine the traits of both systems in one composite picture, which naturally fails to hold together. The confusion goes back to Aristotle, who usually speaks indiscriminately of ‘the Pythagoreans,’ though (...)
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  6. Plato's Cosmology the Timaeus of Plato Translated with a Running Commentary.F. M. Cornford - 1937 - Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner.
  7. Mathematics and dialectic in the republic VI.-VII. (I.).F. M. Cornford - 1932 - Mind 41 (161):37-52.
  8. Plato's Cosmology: The Timaeus of Plato.F. M. Cornford - 1938 - Mind 47 (185):73-80.
     
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  9.  64
    Innumerable Worlds in Presocratic Philosophy.F. M. Cornford - 1934 - Classical Quarterly 28 (01):1-.
    Zeller argued that the ‘innumerable worlds’ mentioned in accounts of Anaximander's system must be an endless succession of single worlds, not an unlimited number of coexistent worlds scattered through infinite space, some always coming into being while others are passing away. Zeller pointed out that a succession of single worlds is grounded in the principles of the system. ‘Things perish into that from which they had their birth… according to the order of Time,’ a cycle of birth, existence, and destruction. (...)
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  10. The unwritten Philosophy and other Essays.F. M. Cornford & W. K. C. Guthrie - 1951 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 141:580-581.
     
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  11. Mathematics and dialectic in the republic VI.-VII. (II.).F. M. Cornford - 1932 - Mind 41 (162):173-190.
  12.  31
    Mysticism and Science in the Pythagorean Tradition.F. M. Cornford - 1922 - Classical Quarterly 16 (3-4):137-150.
    The object of this paper is to show that, in the sixth and fifth centuries B.C., two different and radically opposed systems of thought were elaborated within the Pythagorean school. They may be called respectively the mystical system and the scientific. All current accounts of Pythagoreanism known to me attempt to combine the traits of both systems in one composite picture, which naturally fails to hold together. The confusion goes back to Aristotle, who usually speaks indiscriminately of ‘the Pythagoreans,’ though (...)
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  13.  18
    Innumerable Worlds in Presocratic Philosophy.F. M. Cornford - 1934 - Classical Quarterly 28 (1):1-16.
    Zeller argued that the ‘innumerable worlds’ mentioned in accounts of Anaximander's system must be an endless succession of single worlds, not an unlimited number of coexistent worlds scattered through infinite space, some always coming into being while others are passing away. Zeller pointed out that a succession of single worlds is grounded in the principles of the system. ‘Things perish into that from which they had their birth… according to the order of Time,’ a cycle of birth, existence, and destruction. (...)
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  14.  17
    Principium Sapientiae. The Origins of Greek Philosophical Thought.J. L. Ackrill, F. M. Cornford & W. K. C. Guthrie - 1954 - Philosophical Quarterly 4 (17):378.
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  15.  23
    Mysticism and Science in the Pythagorean Tradition.F. M. Cornford - 1923 - Classical Quarterly 17 (1):1-12.
    We can now approach the interpretation of the famous symbol called the Tetractys or Tetrad, which is a compendium of Pythagorean mysticism. The tetractys is itself a system of numbers. It symbolizes the ‘elements of number,’ which are the elements of all things. It contains the concordant ratios of the musical harmony. It might well be described in the Pythagorean oath as ‘containing the root and fountain of everflowing Nature.’ In one of the acousmata preserved in Iamblichus it is identified (...)
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  16. Principium Sapientiae: The Origins of Greek Philosophical Thought.F. M. Cornford & W. K. C. Guthrie - 1954 - Philosophy 29 (111):370-372.
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  17.  28
    The Ethics of Aristotle.F. M. Cornford - 1900 - Methuen.
  18.  43
    Anaxagoras' Theory of Matter—I.F. M. Cornford - 1930 - Classical Quarterly 24 (01):14-30.
    Anaxagoras’ theory of matter offers a problem which, in bald outline, may be stated as follows. The theory rests on two propositions which seem flatly to contradict one another. One is the principle of Homoeomereity: A natural substance such as a piece of gold, consists solely of parts which are like the whole and like one another—every one of them gold and nothing else. The other is: ‘There is a portion of everything in everything’, understood to mean that a piece (...)
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  19.  66
    Parmenides' Two Ways.F. M. Cornford - 1933 - Classical Quarterly 27 (02):97-.
    The object of this paper is to determine the relations between the two parts of Parmenides' poem: the Way of Truth, which deduces the necessary properties of a One Being, and the False Way, which contains a cosmogony based on ‘what seems to mortals, in which there is no true belief.’.
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  20.  33
    Anaxagoras' Theory of Matter—II.F. M. Cornford - 1930 - Classical Quarterly 24 (2):83-95.
    The earlier part of this paper yielded the result that the assertion ‘A portion of everything in everything’ has no place or function in the explanation of any sort of apparent ‘becoming’ or change. This conclusion is important because, ever since Aristotle, it has been assumed that the assertion was made in order to explain away becoming and change. But if , according to the best evidence, becoming and such sorts of change as Anaxagoras considered can be explained away without (...)
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  21.  21
    Parmenides' Two Ways.F. M. Cornford - 1933 - Classical Quarterly 27 (2):97-111.
    The object of this paper is to determine the relations between the two parts of Parmenides' poem: the Way of Truth, which deduces the necessary properties of a One Being, and the False Way, which contains a cosmogony based on ‘what seems to mortals, in which there is no true belief.’.
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  22. The Unwritten Philosophy.F. M. Cornford & W. K. C. Guthrie - 1950 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 12 (4):774-775.
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  23.  55
    Plato and Orpheus.F. M. Cornford - 1903 - The Classical Review 17 (09):433-445.
  24.  26
    The Tenth Argument to Aristophanes' Clouds.F. M. Cornford - 1912 - Classical Quarterly 6 (04):265-.
    That three of them were popularly regarded as correlated with the three ages of human life; that the structure of early Greek societies, as of other primitive societies, was based on the distinction of three main age-grades, of which the three virtues are characteristic; that Plato's own Ideal State has the same age basis underlying the other features peculiar to it, and is indeed transparently modelled on the Spartan constitution; that it is therefore probable that Plato started with the three (...)
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  25.  10
    The Tenth Argument to Aristophanes' Clouds.F. M. Cornford - 1912 - Classical Quarterly 6 (4):265-265.
    That three of them were popularly regarded as correlated with the three ages of human life; that the structure of early Greek societies, as of other primitive societies, was based on the distinction of three main age-grades, of which the three virtues are characteristic; that Plato's own Ideal State has the same age basis underlying the other features peculiar to it, and is indeed transparently modelled on the Spartan constitution; that it is therefore probable that Plato started with the three (...)
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  26.  15
    Aristotle De Caelo 288a 2–9.F. M. Cornford - 1939 - Classical Quarterly 33 (1):34-35.
    Aristotle is asking why the heaven revolves in one direction rather than the other. His answer is based on his earlier proof that the Universe has a top and a bottom, a right and a left. The upper region, as the place of divinity, is prior or superior to the lower; so upward motion is prior to downward motion. Right is similarly prior and superior to left. The present problem can be solved by supposing that the world has also a (...)
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  27.  36
    Aeschylus, Eumenides 945.F. M. Cornford - 1924 - The Classical Review 38 (5-6):113-.
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  28.  46
    A New Fragment of Parmenides.F. M. Cornford - 1935 - The Classical Review 49 (04):122-123.
  29.  12
    1. ancient philosophy.F. M. Cornford, C. Levi-Strauss, R. B. Onians & J. Barnes - 1997 - In Anthony Kenny (ed.), The Oxford illustrated history of Western philosophy. New York: Oxford University Press.
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  30.  25
    Aristotle, Physics 250A 9–19 and 266A 12–24.F. M. Cornford - 1932 - Classical Quarterly 26 (01):52-.
    The first of these passages states some simple principles of mechanics. The second uses one of these principles to prove that a finite mover cannot cause a motion that will occupy unlimited time. The argument there has given much trouble to commentators because the principle in question was not understood, owing to the choice of a false reading in the earlier passage.
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  31. Before and after Socrates, 1932.F. M. Cornford - 1950 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 12 (4):775-776.
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  32.  51
    Elpis and Eros.F. M. Cornford - 1907 - The Classical Review 21 (08):228-232.
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  33.  35
    Hermes- Nous_ and Pan- _Logos_ in Pindar, _Ol. II.F. M. Cornford - 1912 - The Classical Review 26 (06):180-181.
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  34.  22
    Hermes, Pan, Logos.F. M. Cornford - 1909 - Classical Quarterly 3 (04):281-.
    The object of this paper is to supplement Dr. Zielinski's admirable articles on Hermes und die Hermetik by calling attention to a passage in Aristotle where the triad–Hermes, Pan, Logos –appears, and by showing that there is some probability that the passage refers to a lost work of the rhetorician Alkidamas, the pupil of Gorgias.
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  35.  15
    Hermes, Pan, Logos.F. M. Cornford - 1909 - Classical Quarterly 3 (4):281-284.
    The object of this paper is to supplement Dr. Zielinski's admirable articles on Hermes und die Hermetik by calling attention to a passage in Aristotle where the triad–Hermes, Pan, Logos –appears, and by showing that there is some probability that the passage refers to a lost work of the rhetorician Alkidamas, the pupil of Gorgias.
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  36.  29
    Liddell and Scott.F. M. Cornford - 1920 - The Classical Review 34 (3-4):79-.
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  37.  29
    Lectures on Classical Subjects. By W. R. Hardie, M.A. Macmillan & Co. 1903. PP. x, 348. 7s. net.F. M. Cornford - 1904 - The Classical Review 18 (05):277-.
  38.  31
    Notes on the Oresteia.F. M. Cornford - 1939 - The Classical Review 53 (5-6):162-165.
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  39.  1
    No Title available.F. M. Cornford - 1936 - Philosophy 11 (42):249-249.
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  40.  23
    [Plato] Eryxias 393B.F. M. Cornford - 1932 - The Classical Review 46 (04):156-.
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  41.  5
    [plato] Eryxias 393b.F. M. Cornford - 1932 - The Classical Review 46 (4):156-156.
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  42.  31
    Plato, Theaetetus 209d.F. M. Cornford - 1930 - The Classical Review 44 (04):114-.
  43.  7
    Plato, Theaetetus 209d.F. M. Cornford - 1930 - The Classical Review 44 (4):114-114.
  44. The Division of the Soul.F. M. Cornford - 1929 - Hibbert Journal 28:206-19.
  45.  6
    The Ethics of Aristotle. John Burnet.F. M. Cornford - 1902 - International Journal of Ethics 12 (2):239-247.
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  46. The influence of forensic oratory on thucydides'principles of method.F. M. Cornford & J. H. Finley - 1999 - Classical Quarterly 49:62-73.
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  47. The "polytheism" of Plato: An apology.F. M. Cornford - 1938 - Mind 47 (187):321-330.
  48.  36
    The So-called Kommos in Greek Tragedy.F. M. Cornford - 1913 - The Classical Review 27 (02):41-45.
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  49.  47
    A History Of Greek Public Finance. [REVIEW]F. M. Cornford - 1924 - The Classical Review 38 (5-6):140-140.
  50.  29
    Butler's Translation of the Odyssey. [REVIEW]F. M. Cornford - 1901 - The Classical Review 15 (4):221-222.
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