Results for 'Evolution (Biology History'

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  1.  12
    Evolution: The History of Life on Earth.Russ Hodge - 2009 - Facts on File.
    Describes evolution, including the history of the theory, biological classification, societal and legal ramifications, and the connection between evolution and ...
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  2.  39
    Evolution: The History of an Idea.Peter J. Bowler - 1985 - Journal of the History of Biology 18 (1):155-157.
  3.  14
    Evolution without History?Vassiliki Betty Smocovitis - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (1):131-134.
    This essay is a response to Denis Noble’s argument that the evolutionary synthesis was based on illusory science and that it itself is a kind of illusion. The response includes an historical examination of the relationship between evolutionary biology and molecular biology, along with the importance of history in evolutionary biology, which is an historical science. It raises concerns about adherence to one standard evolutionary theory, and urges the reader to consider a more contextualist and historicist (...)
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  4.  43
    The Evolution of Darwinism: Selection, Adaptation and Progress in Evolutionary Biology.Timothy Shanahan - 2004 - New York, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    No other scientific theory has had as tremendous an impact on our understanding of the world as Darwin's theory as outlined in his Origin of Species, yet from the very beginning the theory has been subject to controversy. The Evolution of Darwinism focuses on three issues of debate - the nature of selection, the nature and scope of adaptation, and the question of evolutionary progress. It traces the varying interpretations to which these issues were subjected from the beginning and (...)
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  5.  49
    Evolution: The Remarkable History of a Scientific Theory.Edward J. Larson - 2004 - Modern Library.
    “I often said before starting, that I had no doubt I should frequently repent of the whole undertaking.” So wrote Charles Darwin aboard The Beagle , bound for the Galapagos Islands and what would arguably become the greatest and most controversial discovery in scientific history. But the theory of evolution did not spring full-blown from the head of Darwin. Since the dawn of humanity, priests, philosophers, and scientists have debated the origin and development of life on earth, and (...)
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  6.  37
    History and biological evolution.Edgar Zilsel - 1940 - Philosophy of Science 7 (1):121-128.
    What is the relationship of history to the phylogenetic evolution of man? Historians, like all specialists, are wont to restrict themselves to their own problems and, therefore, do not deal with this question. Only some popular books on the history of the world cross the dividing line between social and natural science. They start with the origin of the solar system, describe the development of the crust of the earth and of life, turn to prehistoric civilization and (...)
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  7. The Evolution of Designs: Biological Analogy in Architecture and the Applied Arts.Philip Steadman - 2008 - Routledge.
    This book tells the history of the many analogies that have been made between the evolution of organisms and the human production of artefacts, especially buildings. It examines the effects of these analogies on architectural and design theory and considers how recent biological thinking has relevance for design. Architects and designers have looked to biology for inspiration since the early 19th century. They have sought not just to imitate the forms of plants and animals, but to find (...)
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  8.  15
    Biology Reinvigorated: Life/Society, Nature/Culture, Evolution/History.Georges Guille-Escuret - 1997 - Diogenes 45 (180):1-19.
    In fact, analogy is a legitimate form of comparison, and comparison is the only practical means we have for the understanding of things. The fault of the biological sociologists was not that they used it but that they used it wrongly. Instead of trying to control their studies of society by their knowledge of biol ogy, they tried to infer the laws of the first from the laws of the second.
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  9.  2
    Progress Unchained: Ideas of Evolution, Human History and the Future.Peter J. Bowler - 2021 - Cambridge University Press.
    Progress Unchained reinterprets the history of the idea of progress using parallels between evolutionary biology and changing views of human history. Early concepts of progress in both areas saw it as the ascent of a linear scale of development toward a final goal. The 'chain of being' defined a hierarchy of living things with humans at the head, while social thinkers interpreted history as a development toward a final paradise or utopia. Darwinism reconfigured biological progress as (...)
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  10.  17
    History and biological evolution.Edgar Sheffield Brightman & Edgar Zilsel - 1941 - Philosophy of Science 8 (1):100-101.
    When phenomenology was introduced as a new science by Husserl its methods were applied first to objects of logic. Later phenomenological investigation expanded gradually to the fields of psychology, ethics, esthetics, and sociology. More rarely, objects of the natural sciences have been treated phenomenologically. Scattered indications of this kind are to be found in authors who do not belong to the most intimate circle of Husserl's school. Extensively, however, the phenomenological method has been applied to objects of the natural sciences (...)
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  11.  7
    History of Biological Sciences and Medicine Georges Cuvier, Zoologist: A Study in the History of Evolution Theory. By William Coleman. Pp. 212. Harvard University Press; London: Oxford University Press, 1964. 40s. net. [REVIEW]Wilma George - 1966 - British Journal for the History of Science 3 (1):90-90.
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  12. History, Humanity and Evolution: Essays for John C. Greene.James R. Moore - 1989 - Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of thirteen essays by prominent scholars explores the history of evolutionary thought in all of its cultural richness over the past two hundred years. Evolutionary ideas have undergone fundamental changes and are now found to have diverse sources and universal scope. They are no longer beholden to biologists’ understanding of their own past, and do not focus exclusively on Charles Darwin. This volume aims to address the problem of the human significance of evolution. The contributors draw (...)
     
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  13.  38
    Evolution in Four Dimensions: Genetic, Epigenetic, Behavioral, and Symbolic Variation in the History of Life.Eva Jablonka, Marion J. Lamb & Anna Zeligowski - 2005 - Bradford.
    Ideas about heredity and evolution are undergoing a revolutionary change. New findings in molecular biology challenge the gene-centered version of Darwinian theory according to which adaptation occurs only through natural selection of chance DNA variations. In Evolution in Four Dimensions, Eva Jablonka and Marion Lamb argue that there is more to heredity than genes. They trace four "dimensions" in evolution -- four inheritance systems that play a role in evolution: genetic, epigenetic, behavioral, and symbolic. These (...)
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  14. Biological constraints as norms in evolution.Mathilde Tahar - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (1):1-21.
    Biology seems to present local and transitory regularities rather than immutable laws. To account for these historically constituted regularities and to distinguish them from mathematical invariants, Montévil and Mossio have proposed to speak of constraints. In this article we analyse the causal power of these constraints in the evolution of biodiversity, i.e., their positivity, but also the modality of their action on the directions taken by evolution. We argue that to fully account for the causal power of (...)
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  15.  1
    Life and Evolution: Latin American Essays on the History and Philosophy of Biology.Lorenzo Baravalle & Luciana Zaterka (eds.) - 2020 - Springer.
    This book offers to the international reader a collection of original articles of some of the most skillful historians and philosophers of biology currently working in Latin American universities. During the last decades, increasing attention has been paid in Latin America to the history and philosophy of biology, but since many local authors prefer to write in Spanish or in Portuguese, their ideas have barely crossed the boundaries of the continent. This volume aims to remedy this state (...)
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  16.  4
    Evolution as Natural History: A Philosophical Analysis.Wim J. Van der Steen - 2000 - Praeger.
    Wim van der Steen charts the conceptual foundations of evolutionary theory and evaluates applications of the theory. Conceptual analysis shows that evolutionary theory is a body of interesting natural history at a low level of generality. Asserting that laws of evolution do not exist, he shows that evolutionary approaches do not allow for sweeping claims about man.
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  17. Molecular versus Biological Evolution and Programming in The Kaleidoscope of Science. The Israel Colloquium: Studies in History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science. Volume I. [REVIEW]H. Atlan - 1986 - Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 94:137-145.
  18.  45
    History and Philosophy of Science and the Teaching of Evolution: Students’ Conceptions and Explanations.Kostas Kampourakis & Ross H. Nehm - 2014 - In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. pp. 377-399.
    A large body of work in science education indicates that evolution is one of the least understood and accepted scientific theories. Although scholarship from the history and philosophy of science (HPS) has shed light on many conceptual and pedagogical issues in evolution education, HPS-informed studies of evolution education are also characterized by conceptual weaknesses. In this chapter, we critically review such studies and find that some work lacks historically accurate characterizations of student ideas (preconceptions and misconceptions). (...)
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  19.  12
    Conceptual Change in Biology: Scientific and Philosophical Perspectives on Evolution and Development.Alan C. Love (ed.) - 2015 - Berlin: Springer Verlag, Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science.
    This volume explores questions about conceptual change from both scientific and philosophical viewpoints by analyzing the recent history of evolutionary developmental biology. It features revised papers that originated from the workshop "Conceptual Change in Biological Science: Evolutionary Developmental Biology, 1981-2011" held at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin in July 2010. The Preface has been written by Ron Amundson. In these papers, philosophers and biologists compare and contrast key concepts in evolutionary (...)
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  20.  11
    Trees of Life: A Visual History of Evolution.Theodore W. Pietsch - 2012 - Johns Hopkins University Press.
    Brackets and tables, circles and maps, 1554-1872 -- Early botanical networks and trees, 1766-1815 -- The first evolutionary tree, 1786-1820 -- Diverse and unusual trees of the early nineteenth century, 1817-1834 -- The rule of five, 1819-1854 -- Pre-Darwinian branching diagrams, 1828-1858 -- Evolution and the trees of Charles Darwin, 1837-1868 -- The trees of Ernst Haeckel, 1866-1905 -- Post-Darwinian nonconformists, 1868-1896 -- More late-nineteenth-century trees, 1874-1897 -- Trees of the early twentieth century, 1901-1930 -- The trees of Alfred (...)
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  21.  9
    Darwin's Ghosts: The Secret History of Evolution.Rebecca Stott - 2012 - Spiegel & Grau.
    Citing an 1859 letter that accused Charles Darwin of failing to acknowledge his scientific predecessors, a chronicle of the collective history of evolution dedicates each chapter to an evolutionary thinker, from Aristotle and da Vinci to ...
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  22. Genesis: The Evolution of Biology.Jan Sapp - 2003 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Genesis: The Evolution of Biology presents a history of the past two centuries of biology, suitable for use in courses, but of interest more broadly to evolutionary biologists, geneticists, and biomedical scientists, as well as general readers interested in the history of science. The book covers the early evolutionary biologists-Lamarck, Cuvier, Darwin and Wallace through Mayr and the neodarwinian synthesis, in much the same way as other histories of evolution have done, bringing in also (...)
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  23.  13
    Evolution as Entropy: Toward a Unified Theory of Biology[REVIEW]Joseph E. Earley - 1987 - Review of Metaphysics 40 (4):760-761.
    This book aims to "develop the idea that evolution is an axiomatic consequence of organismic information and cohesion systems obeying the second law of thermodynamics in a manner analogous to, but not identical with, the second law's usual application in physical and chemical systems." The authors "adhere to a particular methodological approach called phylogenetic systematics." They have "devoted most of their primary research efforts to discovering historical effects in developmental patterns." Finding that "such historical effects seem ubiquitous," they "began (...)
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  24.  4
    The Growth of Biological Thought: Diversity, Evolution, and Inheritance. [REVIEW]Ernst Mayr - 1985 - Journal of the History of Biology 18 (1):145-153.
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  25. How development changes evolution: Conceptual and historical issues in evolutionary developmental biology.Stavros Ioannidis - 2008 - Biology and Philosophy 23 (4):567-578.
    Evolutionary developmental biology (Evo-Devo) is a new and rapidly developing field of biology which focuses on questions in the intersection of evolution and development and has been seen by many as a potential synthesis of these two fields. This synthesis is the topic of the books reviewed here. Integrating Evolution and Development (edited by Roger Sansom and Robert Brandon), is a collection of papers on conceptual issues in Evo-Devo, while From Embryology to Evo-Devo (edited by Manfred (...)
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  26.  67
    The Evolution of the Human Self: Tracing the Natural History of Self‐Awareness.Mark R. Leary & Nicole R. Buttermore - 2003 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 33 (4):365-404.
    Previous discussions of the evolution of the self have diverged greatly in their estimates of the date at which the capacity for self-thought emerged, the factors that led self-reflection to evolve, and the nature of the evidence offered to support these disparate conclusions. Beginning with the assumption that human self-awareness involves a set of distinct cognitive abilities that evolved at different times to solve different adaptive problems, we trace the evolution of self-awareness from the common ancestor of humans (...)
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  27.  22
    The Evolution of Cosmic, Biological, and Intellectual Structures.Jürgen H. Hohnholz - 1985 - Philosophy and History 18 (1):35-36.
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  28.  5
    Organic form and evolution: the morphological problem in twentieth-century italian biology.Marco Tamborini - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (4):1-17.
    This paper examines the efforts in evolution research to understand form’s structure that developed in Italy during the first half of the twentieth century. In particular, it analyzes how the organic approach in biology and the study of organic form merged in the morphological research agendas of Giuseppe Colosi and Giuseppe Levi. These biologists sought to understand form’s inner composition and structure. First, I will briefly outline the morphological practices and frameworks used to study form changes and structures (...)
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  29.  13
    The biology/culture link in human evolution, 1750–1950: the problem of integration in science.Richard G. Delisle - 2000 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 31 (4):531-556.
  30.  1
    Biology as a Technology of Social Justice in Interwar Britain: Arguments from Evolutionary History, Heredity, and Human Diversity.Marianne Sommer - 2014 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 39 (4):561-586.
    In this article, I am concerned with the public engagements of Julian Huxley, Lancelot Hogben, and J. B. S. Haldane. I analyze how they used the new insights into the genetics of heredity to argue against any biological foundations for antidemocratic ideologies, be it Nazism, Stalinism, or the British laissez-faire and class system. The most striking fact—considering the abuse of biological knowledge they contested—is that these biologists presented genetics itself as inherently democratic. Arguing from genetics, they developed an understanding of (...)
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  31.  38
    The Evolution Wars: A Guide to the Debates.Michael Ruse - 2000 - Santa Barbara, USA: ABC-CLIO.
    The year 2009 marks the 200-year anniversary of Charles Darwin's birth. This timely update of The Evolution Wars draws on history, science, and philosophy to examine the development of evolutionary thought through the past two and a half centuries.
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  32.  10
    The Evolution of Biology. By M. J. Sirks and Conway Zirkle. Pp. vi + 376. New York: Ronald Press Company, 1964. $6.E. Underwood - 1966 - British Journal for the History of Science 3 (2):197-197.
  33.  39
    Aromorphoses in Biological and Social Evolution: Some General Rules for Biological and Social Forms of Macroevolution.Leonid Grinin, Alexander Markov, Markov & Andrey Korotayev - 2009 - Social Evolution and History 8 (2).
    The comparison between biological and social macroevolution is a very important (though insufficiently studied) subject whose analysis renders new significant possibilities to comprehend the processes, trends, mechanisms, and peculiarities of each of the two types of macroevolution. Of course, there are a few rather important (and very understandable) differences between them; however, it appears possible to identify a number of fundamental similarities. One may single out at least three fundamental sets of factors determining those similarities. First of all, those similarities (...)
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  34.  1
    Defining Darwin: Essays on the History and Philosophy of Evolutionary Biology.Michael Ruse - 2009 - Prometheus Books.
    Discusses the influence of Charles Darwin's theory of evolution on the field of science as well as its cultural influences, and challenges the origins and methods of Darwin's research.
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  35. The biology/culture link in human evolution, 1750-1950: The problem of integration in science.G. R. - 2000 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 31 (4):531-556.
     
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  36.  10
    Between Social and Biological Heredity: Cope and Baldwin on Evolution, Inheritance, and Mind.David Ceccarelli - 2019 - Journal of the History of Biology 52 (1):161-194.
    In the years of the post-Darwinian debate, many American naturalists invoked the name of Lamarck to signal their belief in a purposive and anti-Darwinian view of evolution. Yet Weismann’s theory of germ-plasm continuity undermined the shared tenet of the neo-Lamarckian theories as well as the idea of the interchangeability between biological and social heredity. Edward Drinker Cope, the leader of the so-called “American School,” defended his neo-Lamarckian philosophy against every attempt to redefine the relationship between behavior, development, and heredity (...)
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  37.  22
    The biology/culture link in human evolution, 1750–1950: the problem of integration in science.Richard G. Delisle - 2000 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 31 (4):531-556.
  38. Biology as History Papers From International Conferences Sponsored by the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco and the Museo Civico di Storia Naturale in Milan.Giovanni Pinna, Michael T. Ghiselin, California Academy of Sciences & Museo Civico di Storia Naturale di Milano - 1996 - Società Italiana di Scienze Naturali E Museo Civico di Storia Naturale di Milano.
  39. Okasha’s evolution and the levels of selection: toward a broader conception of theoretical biology: Oxford University Press, Oxford. [REVIEW]Massimo Pigliucci - 2010 - Biology and Philosophy 25 (3):405-415.
    The debate about the levels of selection has been one of the most controversial both in evolutionary biology and in philosophy of science. Okasha’s book makes the sort of contribution that simply will not be able to be ignored by anyone interested in this field for many years to come. However, my interest here is in highlighting some examples of how Okasha goes about discussing his material to suggest that his book is part of an increasingly interesting trend that (...)
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  40.  42
    Evolution: The Triumph of an Idea.Carl Zimmer - 2001 - Harperperennial.
    This remarkable book presents a rich and up-to-date view of evolution that explores the far-reaching implications of Darwin's theory and emphasizes the power, significance, and relevance of evolution to our lives today. After all, we ourselves are the product of evolution, and we can tackle many of our gravest challenges -- from lethal resurgence of antiobiotic-resistant diseases to the wave of extinctions that looms before us -- with a sound understanding of the science.
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  41.  47
    The Early History of Chance in Evolution.Charles H. Pence - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 50:48-58.
    Work throughout the history and philosophy of biology frequently employs ‘chance’, ‘unpredictability’, ‘probability’, and many similar terms. One common way of understanding how these concepts were introduced in evolution focuses on two central issues: the first use of statistical methods in evolution (Galton), and the first use of the concept of “objective chance” in evolution (Wright). I argue that while this approach has merit, it fails to fully capture interesting philosophical reflections on the role of (...)
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  42. Evolution before Darwin: theories of the transmutation of species in Edinburgh, 1804-1834.Bill Jenkins - 2019 - Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
    1. Introduction -- 2. Edinburgh's university and medical schools in the early nineteenth century -- 3. Natural history in Edinburgh, 1779-1832 -- 4. Geology and evolution -- 5. Edinburgh and Paris -- 6. The legacy of the 'Edinburgh Lamarckians' -- 7. Conclusion.
     
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  43.  30
    The Discovery of Evolution.David Young - 2007 - Cambridge University Press, in Association with Natural History Museum, London.
    The Discovery of Evolution explains what the theory of evolution is all about by providing a historical narrative of discovery. Some of the major puzzles that confront anyone studying living things are discussed and it details how these were solved from an evolutionary perspective. Beginning with the emergence of the early naturalists in the seventeenth century, the scientific discoveries that led up to and then flowed from Darwin and Wallace's theory of evolution by natural selection are then (...)
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  44. Development and Evolution: Including Psychophysical Evolution, Evolution by Orthoplasy, and the Theory of Genetic Modes.James Mark Baldwin - 1902 - Blackburn Press.
  45.  4
    Darwin's Century: Evolution and the Men Who Discovered It.Loren C. Eiseley - 1958 - Anchor Books.
    An examination of the development of the theory of evolution from the Renaissance to the twentieth century.
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  46.  91
    Language and life history: A new perspective on the development and evolution of human language.John L. Locke & Barry Bogin - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):259-280.
    It has long been claimed that Homo sapiens is the only species that has language, but only recently has it been recognized that humans also have an unusual pattern of growth and development. Social mammals have two stages of pre-adult development: infancy and juvenility. Humans have two additional prolonged and pronounced life history stages: childhood, an interval of four years extending between infancy and the juvenile period that follows, and adolescence, a stage of about eight years that stretches from (...)
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  47. Human brain evolution, theories of innovation, and lessons from the history of technology.Alfred Gierer - 2004 - J. Biosci 29 (3):235-244.
    Biological evolution and technological innovation, while differing in many respects, also share common features. In particular, implementation of a new technology in the market is analogous to the spreading of a new genetic trait in a population. Technological innovation may occur either through the accumulation of quantitative changes, as in the development of the ocean clipper, or it may be initiated by a new combination of features or subsystems, as in the case of steamships. Other examples of the latter (...)
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  48. The history of Hayek's theory of cultural evolution.E. Angner - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 33 (4):695-718.
    This paper traces the historical origins of Friedrich A. Hayek's theory of cultural evolution, and argues that Hayek's evolutionary thought was significantly inspired by Alexander M. Carr-Saunders and Oxford zoology. While traditional Hayek scholarship emphasizes the influence of Carl Menger and the British eighteenth-century moral philosophers, I claim that these sources underdetermine what was most characteristic of Hayek's theory, viz. the idea that cultural evolution is a matter of group selection, and the idea that natural selection operates on (...)
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  49.  3
    Evolution as Natural History: A Philosophical Analysis. [REVIEW]Richard J. Blackwell - 2001 - Review of Metaphysics 54 (4):950-950.
    This book is focused on the conceptual structure of the theory of evolution, and will be of value primarily for theoretical biologists and philosophers of biology who are interested in the question of the explanatory character of evolutionary theory. The historical development of the notion of evolution is not the author’s concern; he directs his discussion almost completely to the relevant literature of the past twenty years or so. This feature makes the book an excellent resource for (...)
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  50.  27
    The Ancestor's Tale: A Pilgrimage to the Dawn of Evolution.Richard Dawkins - 2004 - Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
    The renowned biologist and thinker Richard Dawkins presents his most expansive work yet: a comprehensive look at evolution, ranging from the latest developments in the field to his own provocative views. Loosely based on the form of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Dawkins's Tale takes us modern humans back through four billion years of life on our planet. As the pilgrimage progresses, we join with other organisms at the forty "rendezvous points" where we find a common ancestor. The band of pilgrims (...)
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