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  1.  76
    Climato-economic habitats support patterns of human needs, stresses, and freedoms.Evert Van de Vliert - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):465 - 480.
    This paper examines why fundamental freedoms are so unevenly distributed across the earth. Climato-economic theorizing proposes that humans adapt needs, stresses, and choices of goals, means, and outcomes to the livability of their habitat. The evolutionary process at work is one of collectively meeting climatic demands of cold winters or hot summers by using monetary resources. Freedom is expected to be lowest in poor populations threatened by demanding thermal climates, intermediate in populations comforted by undemanding temperate climates irrespective of income (...)
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  2.  48
    White, gray, and black domains of cultural adaptations to climato-economic conditions.Evert Van de Vliert - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):503 - 521.
    Forty-nine commentators have reviewed the theory that needs-based stresses and freedoms are shaped differently in threatening, comforting, and challenging climato-economic habitats. Their commentaries cover the white domain, where the theory does apply (e.g., happiness, collectivism, and democracy), the gray domain, where it may or may not apply (e.g., personality traits and creativity), and the black domain, where it does not apply (e.g., human intelligence and gendered culture). This response article provides clarifications, recommendations, and expectations.
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  3.  27
    Climato-economic livability predicts societal collectivism and political autocracy better than parasitic stress does.Evert Van de Vliert & Tom Postmes - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (2):94-95.
    A 121-nation study of societal collectivism and a 174-nation study of political autocracy show that parasitic stress does not account for any variation in these components of culture once the interactive impacts of climatic demands and income resources have been accounted for. Climato-economic livability is a viable rival explanation for the reported effects of parasitic stress on culture.
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  4.  20
    Hell on earth? Equatorial peaks of heat, poverty, and aggression.Evert Van de Vliert & Serge Daan - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  5.  20
    Perverse Effects of Other-Referenced Performance Goals in an Information Exchange Context.P. Marijn Poortvliet, Frederik Anseel, Onne Janssen, Nico W. Van Yperen & Evert Van de Vliert - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (4):401-414.
    We argue and demonstrate that an emphasis on outperforming others may lead to perverse effects. Four studies show that assigning other-referenced performance goals, relative to self-referenced mastery goals, may lead to more interpersonally harmful behavior in an information exchange context. Results of Study 1 indicate that assigned performance goals lead to stronger thwarting behavior and less accurate information giving to an exchange partner than assigned mastery goals. Similarly, in Study 2 performance goal individuals more subtly deceived highly competent opponents relative (...)
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