Results for 'Euthydemus'

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  1.  9
    Plato's Euthydemus: Analysis of What is and is Not Philosophy.Thomas H. Chance - 1992 - University of California Press.
    With _Plato's Euthydemus_, Thomas Chance solves a longstanding riddle of Platonic studies. Thought to be an early, immature work, the _Euthydemus_ has come across to scholars as lacking Plato's characteristic greatness. This apparent lack, Chance argues, is not a failure of the text but of scholarly perception. He advances a single thesis: that Plato deliberately presents _eristic_—contentious debate—as the antithesis to his own philosophical method. Once this thesis is accepted, the "hidden" purpose of the _Euthydemus_ becomes manifest: Plato has used (...)
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  2. Wisdom and Happiness in Euthydemus 278–282.Russell E. Jones - 2013 - Philosophers' Imprint 13.
    Plato’s Socrates is often thought to hold that wisdom or virtue is sufficient for happiness, and Euthydemus 278-282 is often taken to be the locus classicus for this sufficiency thesis in Plato’s dialogues. But this view is misguided: Not only does Socrates here fail to argue for, assert, or even implicitly assume the sufficiency thesis, but the thesis turns out to be hard to square with the argument he does give. I argue for an interpretation of the passage that (...)
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  3.  2
    The Euthydemus of Plato: With Revised Text, Introduction, Notes and Indices.Edwin Hamilton Gifford (ed.) - 1905 - Cambridge University Press.
    Headmaster of King Edward's School in Birmingham for fourteen years, Edwin Hamilton Gifford also held a number of ecclesiastical posts, including select preacher at both Cambridge and Oxford. Better known for his biblical and patristic scholarship, he also prepared this edition of the Euthydemus, Plato's most comical dialogue. Thought to be an early work, depicting a discussion between Socrates and two sophists trained in eristic, it is among the earliest-known treatises on logic, satirising various fallacies that were subsequently categorised (...)
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  4.  26
    Euthydemus. Plato - 1965 - Kessinger Publishing.
    We contrived at last, somehow or other, to agree in a general conclusion, that he who had wisdom had no need of fortune.
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  5. Euthydemus. Plato - 1965 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 162:39-39.
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  6.  10
    Plato. Euthydemus.E. H. Gifford - 1905 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 25:189.
  7. Plato: Euthydemus, Lysis, Charmides: Proceedings of the V Symposium Platonicum : Selected Papers.T. M. Robinson & Luc Brisson (eds.) - 2000 - Academia Verlag.
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  8.  29
    The Euthydemus as a Locus of the Socratic Elenchus.Gerard Hinrichs - 1951 - New Scholasticism 25 (2):178-183.
  9.  4
    Euthydemus. Plato - 1965 - Bobbs-Merrill.
    "This is the best translation available of a lively and challenging dialogue, which sets before the reader profound questions about the use and misuse of reason." --Myles Burnyeat, University of Cambridge.
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  10.  38
    Commentary on Plato's Euthydemus.R. S. W. Hawtrey - 1935 - American Philosophical Society.
  11.  4
    The Older Sophists: A Complete Translation by Several Hands of the Fragments in Die Fragmente der Vorsokratiker, Edited by Diels-Kranz. With a New Edition of Antiphon and of Euthydemus.Rosamond Kent Sprague (ed.) - 1972 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    This sourcebook, a corrected reprint of the University of South Carolina Press edition of 1972, contains a complete English translation of the sophist material collected in the critical edition of Diels-Krantz, as well as Euthydemus and a completely re-edited Antiphon.
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  12.  43
    Complex Wisdom in the Euthydemus.Joshua I. Fox - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (3):187-211.
    In the Euthydemus, Socrates is presented as an eager student of seemingly trivial arts, earning derision both for desiring to master the peculiar art of Euthydemus and Dionysodorus and for studying the harp in his old age. I explain Socrates’ interest in these apparently trivial arts by way of a novel reading of the first protreptic argument, suggesting that the wisdom Socrates praises is complex in nature, securing the happiness of its possessor only insofar as it is composed (...)
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  13.  33
    Plato: Euthydemus. Trans, with Introd. By Rosamond Kent Sprague.M. Joseph Costelloe - 1969 - Modern Schoolman 46 (2):179-180.
  14.  14
    Euthydemus: Ethics and Language. By Samuel Scolnicov. Pp. 179, Sankt Augustin, Academia Verlag, 2013 , 26 €.Robin Waterfield - 2016 - Heythrop Journal 57 (1):164-165.
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  15.  14
    Euthydemus[REVIEW]J. W. R. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (1):157-157.
    The author of Plato's Use of Fallacy has provided a felicitous new translation of the Euthydemus. Notes are supplied to explain arguments which depend on peculiarities of Greek. The introduction points out, but deliberately avoids settling, questions raised by the dialogue, allowing Plato to speak for himself.—R. J. W.
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  16.  3
    Plato: Euthydemus Translated. [REVIEW]I. M. Crombie - 1968 - The Classical Review 18 (2):236-236.
  17.  26
    The Euthydemus Monique Canto: L' Intrigue Philosophique: Essai Sur l'Euthydème de Platon (Précédé d'Une Traduction Inédite). (Collection de Commentaires d'Auteurs Anciens.) Pp. 327. Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1987. Paper, 320 Frs. [REVIEW]R. S. W. Hawtrey - 1988 - The Classical Review 38 (02):221-222.
  18.  29
    The Euthydemus.R. S. W. Hawtrey - 1988 - The Classical Review 38 (02):221-.
  19. Plato, Euthydemus[REVIEW]G. J. De Vries - 1967 - Mnemosyne 20 (4):466-466.
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  20.  8
    The Euthydemus[REVIEW]R. S. W. Hawtrey - 1988 - The Classical Review 38 (2):221-222.
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  21. The Euthydemus.J. B. Edwards - 1917 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 11:217-221.
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  22. The Euthydemus.J. B. Edwards - 1917 - Classical Weekly 11:217-221.
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  23. Plato, Euthydemus, Lysis, Charmides, Proceedings of the 5th Symposium Platonicum, Toronto, 1998.Thomas M. Robinson, Luc Brisson & Francisco L. Lisi - 2002 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 192 (3):358-359.
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  24.  29
    The Euthydemus of Plato. By E. H. Gifford, D.D. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 1905. Pp. Viii + 184. 3s. 6d. [REVIEW]H. Richards - 1905 - The Classical Review 19 (05):277-.
  25.  10
    The Euthydemus of Plato. By E. H. Gifford, D.D. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 1905. Pp. Viii + 184. 3s. 6d. [REVIEW]H. Richards - 1905 - The Classical Review 19 (5):277-277.
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  26. Happiness in the Euthydemus.Panos Dimas - 2002 - Phronesis 47 (1):1-27.
    Departing on a demonstration which aims to show to young Cleinias how one ought to care about wisdom and virtue, Socrates asks at 278e2 whether people want to do well (εὐ πράττειν). Εὐ πράττειν is ambiguous. It can mean being happy and prospering, or doing what is right and doing it well. Socrates will later exploit this ambiguity, but at this point he uses this expression merely to announce his conviction that every human being (pathological cases aside, perhaps) desires to (...)
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  27.  7
    Eristic Combat at Euthydemus 285e–286b.Ravi Sharma & Russell E. Jones - 2019 - Australasian Philosophical Review 3 (2):167-175.
    ABSTRACT M.M. McCabe argues that in Plato’s Euthydemus, Dionysodorus and Euthydemus hold a view she calls ‘chopped logos’. Chopped logos implies that nothing said is false, or opposed to any other statement, or entailed by any other statement. We focus on a key piece of evidence for chopped logos, the argument concluding that there is no such thing as contradiction, and defend a competing interpretation. The argument in question, and the eristic exchanges as a whole, are simply examples (...)
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  28. On the Euthydemus.Leo Strauss - 1970 - Interpretation 1 (1):1-20.
  29.  18
    Plato's Euthydemus: Analysis of What Is and Is Not Philosophy. [REVIEW]Christopher Kirwan - 1994 - The Classical Review 44 (2):400-400.
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  30. The Daimon in the Euthydemus.Carl Levenson - 2007 - Philosophia: International Journal of Philosophy (Philippine e-journal) 36 (2).
    Socrates’ daimonion, that numinous “presence” restraining him from error, is prominently featured in Plato’s Apology and plays an important role in several other dialogues.Socrates speaks of it often. It was, he reports, a constant feature of his life. It may also have caused his death because, as we read in the Euthyphro, he talked about the daimon so often that he aroused suspicion and resentment—and was finally indicted for impiety . It may seem a bit scandalous that the patron saint (...)
     
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  31.  36
    Socrates' Philosophical Protreptic in Euthydemus 278c–282d.Benjamin A. Rider - 2012 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 94 (2):208-228.
  32. Hippias Major, Hippias Minor, Euthydemus. Translated & Introduced by Robin Waterfield - 1987 - In Plato (ed.), Early Socratic Dialogues. Penguin Books.
     
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  33.  28
    Rosamond Kent Sprague: Plato: Euthydemus Translated. Pp. Xv+70. New York: Bobbs-Merrill Co., 1965. Paper, $1.25.I. M. Crombie - 1968 - The Classical Review 18 (2):236-236.
  34.  2
    ‘Learning’ and Learning at Euthydemus 275d–278d.Christine J. Thomas - 2019 - Australasian Philosophical Review 3 (2):191-197.
    ABSTRACT Early in Plato’s Euthydemus, sophistical arguments threaten the intelligibility of the process of learning. According to M. M. McCabe, Socrates resists the sophists’ arguments by resisting their problematic replacement model of change. The replacement model proposes that one item is simply replaced with a nonidentical item. Socrates is said to endorse a rival metaphysics of temporally extended, teleologically structured activities. The rival model allows an enduring subject to survive ‘aspect changes’ by occupying distinct stages in a continuous, unified (...)
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  35.  31
    Plato’s Euthydemus: Analysis of What Is and Is Not Philosophy. [REVIEW]Robin Waterfield - 1995 - Ancient Philosophy 15 (1):191.
  36. Forms in Plato's 'Euthydemus'.Richard Mohr - 1984 - Hermes 112 (3):296-300.
  37.  24
    Plato’s Euthydemus: Analysis of What Is and Is Not Philosophy.Robin Waterfield - 1995 - Ancient Philosophy 15 (1):191 - 198.
  38.  9
    'An Inconsequent Ado About Matters of No Consequence': Comic Turns in Plato's "Euthydemus".S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2014 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (1):15-32.
    Scholarship on the Euthydemus has largely focused on the protreptic character of the Euthydemus—that is, the manner by which Socrates attempts to turn the young Cleinias toward philosophy. By focusing on the dramatic structure of the text, and above all its comic tenor, this article argues that it is Crito—he to whom Socrates tells his hilarious story of his encounter with the two sophist-brothers—who is the real object of Socrates’s protreptic speech.
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  39.  5
    Teleology and Sophistic Endeavour in the Euthydemus.Daniel Vázquez & Saloni de Souza - 2019 - Australasian Philosophical Review 3 (2):183-190.
    ABSTRACT In this paper, we build upon M.M. McCabe's [2021] characterisation of two accounts of logos and Socratic endeavour in Plato's Euthydemus. We argue that the brothers, Euthydemus and Dionysodorus, are engaged in and committed to an endeavour which has features in common with Socrates’. It has an aim, rules, and is subject to failure. It is also a unified activity in which structure, process and continuity are important. However, the brothers’ only aim is impressing their audience and (...)
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  40.  10
    Plato’s Euthydemus and Crito’s Failure to Hear.Samantha Deane - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (3):373-375.
  41.  53
    Commentary on Plato’s Euthydemus[REVIEW]Richard Mckirahan - 1987 - Ancient Philosophy 7:229.
  42.  7
    Plato's Use of Fallacy : A Study of the Euthydemus and Some Other Dialogues.Rosamond K. Sprague - 1962 - Routledge.
    There are many fallacious arguments in the dialogues of Plato. The author argues that Plato was fully conscious of the fallacious character of at least an important number of these arguments and that he sometimes made deliberate use of fallacy as an indirect means of setting forth certain of his fundamental philosophical views. Plato introduces them, the author maintains, for the purpose of working out their implications. Plato is thus able to expose them for what they are, to clear away (...)
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  43. ""Plato's" Euthydemus" and a Platonist Education Program.H. Tarrant - 2003 - Dionysius 21:7-22.
  44. Plato's Euthydemus and Lysias.L. Arnold Post - 1926 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 20:29-31.
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  45.  34
    Socrates' Iolaos: Myth and Eristic in Plato's Euthydemus.Robin Jackson - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (02):378-.
    The Euthydemus presents a brilliantly comic contrast between Socratic and sophistic argument. Socrates' encounter with the sophistic brothers Euthydemus and Dionysodorus exposes the hollowness of their claim to teach virtue, unmasking it as a predilection for verbal pugilism and the peddling of paradox. The dialogue's humour is pointed, for the brothers' fallacies are often reminiscent of substantial dilemmas explored seriously elsewhere in Plato, and the farce of their manipulation is in sharp contrast to the sobriety with which Socrates (...)
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  46.  6
    Commentary on Plato's Euthydemus[REVIEW]G. J. De Vries - 1985 - Mnemosyne 38 (1-2):197-198.
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  47.  11
    Socrates’ Iolaos: Myth and Eristic in Plato's Euthydemus.Robin Jackson - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (2):378-395.
    The Euthydemus presents a brilliantly comic contrast between Socratic and sophistic argument. Socrates' encounter with the sophistic brothers Euthydemus and Dionysodorus exposes the hollowness of their claim to teach virtue, unmasking it as a predilection for verbal pugilism and the peddling of paradox. The dialogue's humour is pointed, for the brothers' fallacies are often reminiscent of substantial dilemmas explored seriously elsewhere in Plato, and the farce of their manipulation is in sharp contrast to the sobriety with which Socrates (...)
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  48.  2
    Commentary on Plato’s Euthydemus[REVIEW]Richard Mckirahan - 1987 - Ancient Philosophy 7:229-232.
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  49.  4
    Crito in Plato’s Euthydemus: The Lover of Family and of Money.Martin J. Plax - 2000 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 17 (1-2):35-59.
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  50.  1
    The Older Sophists: A Complete Translation by Several Hands of the Fragments in Die Fragmente Der Vorsokratiker, Edited by Diels-Kranz. With a New Edition of Antiphon and of Euthydemus.Hermann Diels & Rosamond Kent Sprague (eds.) - 1972 - Hackett.
    Name and notion -- Protagoras -- Xeniades -- Gorgias -- Lycophron -- Prodicus -- Thrasymachus -- Hippias -- Antiphon -- Critias -- Anonymus Iamblichi -- Dissoi Logoi or Dialexeis -- Appendix: Euthydemus of Chios.
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